Job prospects out of UCLA?

Hey guys, I'm heading to UCLA in the fall as a transfer in the Math/Econ major, and am aiming to work on wall street as an analyst after graduation. I'm planning on taking an extra year there (they gave me a substantial amount of money to enroll there) in order to have one summer to study abroad (hopefully LSE) and one summer to intern.

But for now I'm just learning everything I can about finance through reading a bunch of books and WSJ/FT. I'm going to network hard once I get there and attend recruiting events and do everything I can to keep the GPA up.

How is UCLA in terms of getting a job in finance (Ibanking mostly)?

Thanks a lot

Comments (43)

Jul 6, 2011

Which banks recruit at UCLA? There's your answer.

Jul 6, 2011

There are some good alumni. Might want to start from there.

Jul 6, 2011

For ibanking I know Citi LA and RBC SF recruit at UCLA

Jul 6, 2011

Why not reach out to Larry Fink? I see BlackRock in your future

Jul 6, 2011

I knew several analysts who went to UCLA at BBs a couple of years ago. Not sure if anything's changed since then (in terms of recruiting).

Jul 6, 2011

you will be fine for LA banks, although there are limited spots so you need to start early by doing internships and networking your way into interviews. SF or NYC will be pretty tough unless you have some strong ties to tech (in SF's case) by have an EE/CS degree.

Jul 6, 2011

All the BB banks recruit at UCLA, but there's also tons of people who want to go into banking from there. About 10-15 people each year go to BBs. Read into that how you want to.

Jul 6, 2011

Moelis, DB and BlackRock recruit at UCLA too, for some reason, they don't go to USC. All the other BBs should recruit there too...

Jul 6, 2011

Okay thanks a lot guys, really appreciate the help. I would love to work for a big bank, or even BlackRock would be awesome

Other than just trying to dominate my course work, what other advice would you give to me in order to position myself to get the best positions?

Career events, reaching out to alums, etc? Any advice will be def appreciated.

Jul 8, 2011

When I interviewed with WF in SF, 3 guys were there from UCLA

Jul 8, 2011

You definitely have the option to ask for only a single office preference when applying (at least this was true when I went through 2 years ago). This will not hurt your candidacy as far as I know.

BCG's West Coast offices (LA/SF) are staffed together, so there is a good amount of variety in project work (tech, industrial goods, financial services, etc.)

Jul 8, 2011

Check linkedin looks like lots of Anderson grads in MBB LA offices. I'm pretty sure if you are in LA they are recruiting for LA and if anything it would be more difficult to get jobs outside of LA.

Jul 8, 2011

I interviewed for an MBB's LA office (internship) and yes, I can confirm that there are a good amount of Anderson grads there.

"Rage, rage against the dying of the light." - DT

Jul 8, 2011

Awesome, thanks for the confirmation folks.

Jul 8, 2011

Bump. Is it safe to say this is still the case? And would it basically be HSW and then Anderson MBAs in the LA offices?

Jul 8, 2011

Oh definitely. UCLA and USC all place people into MBB.

Jul 8, 2011
GreenAttack:

Oh definitely. UCLA and USC all place people into MBB.

At McK, I met several UCLA MBA grads. I would estimate 3 hires per year for full time. Did not ever meet a USC MBA though.

As long as you crushed the interviews, it didn't matter where you came from.

Jul 8, 2011

Great, thanks for the insight.

Jul 8, 2011

Anderson does better with LA than with NYC, as most banks send their LA ppl to recruit there.

That being said, that does not mean every newly minted MBA places into CS LA and UBS LA.

NYC would involve a lot more networking.

Go back East for MBA if you want to settle back East. It's just easier.

Jul 8, 2011

What you say definitely makes sense. I'm thinking I want to settle in Southern California, but might like spend a couple years in NY for the experience.

I'm deciding between a few MBA programs ranked 5-10 (i.e. not HBS, Stanford, Wharton, MIT) and UCLA Anderson, which has offered money.

I regretfully have zero i-banking experience, but am determined to get my foot in the door. Assuming I want to stay in So Cal, I'm wondering if it's ridiculous to turn down higher-ranked programs for UCLA.

Thanks again for your thoughts.

Jul 8, 2011

Anderson just placed 3 summer associates at UBS LA and 2 at CS LA.

Jul 8, 2011

UCLA is very close to many of the regional offices of LA banks. With that level of proximity you should be able to easily network your way into a Summer Associate position.

Again, if you want a NYC position, banks still come out here so you won't be locked into any one market.

Jul 8, 2011

For an LA office yes. NYC not so much

I didn't say it was your fault, I said I was blaming you.

Jul 8, 2011

for California.

But USC tends to be more of a target than UCLA for some reason. I think it has to do with having an undergraduate business school and the demographic of the student body. UCLA students tends to be more "academic" and more likely to go on to grad school for a PhD or whatever while USC students are more "professional" and want to get into finance or whatever and start making money.

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Jul 8, 2011

Semi

Jul 8, 2011

The most accurate term is probably "Regional Target." All the top shops have at least a resume-drop there, but (almost) all the spots are for LA or SF.

"Millionaires don't use astrology, billionaires do"

Jul 8, 2011

Dude, you go to UCLA and you only have a 3.97? You're fucked.

"If you can count your money, you don't have a billion dollars." - J. Paul Getty

Jul 8, 2011

A decent amount of West Coast groups recruit out of UCLA. It's much harder to get to NY.

1) Get out of SAS. They convince themselves that Big4 accounting is the Holy Grail.
2) Get involved with the Undergrad Business Society and get in touch with the i-banking mentors/officers.
3) Get into the i-banking workshop.

4) don't listen to your professors, friends, or other bus/econ kids that are pushing you to do big4 accounting. give them the finger and pursue banking.

Jul 8, 2011

I am a UCLA grad so shoot me a PM if you want.

Generally speaking get involved with the UBS as stated above. Keep you grades up and try to get a internship this summer or during the school year. Get that accounting minor too. Being as though its your freshman summer and will be sophomore school year shoot for anything finance related internship. Even something that's unpaid and 10-20 hours a week will be good. It displays youre interested and gives you opportunities to build upon before recruiting for the real summer analyst positions that open up during your junior summer. Use the career center website to look for jobs and when late fall/early winter jr year roll around be on the look out for those summer analyst gigs. Plenty of kids get banking jobs out of UCLA, its really not that hard if you set yourself up properly.

Jul 8, 2011

oh yeah, just as ke18sb stated, get an internship ASAP during the school year or over the summer related to finance. Even if it's just wealth management, that'll do. Most people from UCLA i know did WM internship during the year, then banking internship, --> banking FT.

Jul 8, 2011

this is not meant to be snobby however the fact that you are from a cc is a huge disadvantage. i wouldn't disclose that on your resume if i were you. as far as the classes maybe you can take some of the management classes this summer or econ 106f or 160 those might help you brush up.

Jul 8, 2011

I don't necessarily agree with that comment. He/She is going to be at UCLA now - in my opinion, in the eyes of a recruiter, this could be seen as someone who is driven and motivated to move up. I'd think it would be hard to go from a community college to UCLA with a 3.0. It's not about where you start, but where you finish. He's getting a degree from UCLA, which is all that really matters.

Regarding the weak background in accounting, I wouldn't necessarily consider that a be all, end all to a career in ibd. I came from a Top 10 liberal arts college, from a non-econ/math/finance/any other related degree background and it worked out fine for me.

Any bright kid could do this stuff - what's just as important is to show that you have solid quant skills, you're driven, passionate, a hard worker, and are sociable and not a douche.

Don't pretend to know everything about DCF's, comps etc. Know the basics, but more importantly speak to your strengths and be able to tell a compelling story about why you want to get into this business.

This is probably a bit of a cliche, but I hope this helps.

Jul 8, 2011

cubemonkey you clearly don't know about the california college education system. one doesn't stand a chance if recruiters know you are from a cc especially for a summer analyst position. maybe after you do a year at ucla and kill it grade wise then one can overcome the cc. however who is going to give a kid a summer position that has taken no classes at the school. not to mention tranfering into ucla and getting in out of high school is night and day. everyone knows this including recruiters. i'm trying to help the kid out here by letting him know to avoid the cc issue as much as possible.

Jul 8, 2011

Thanks for the input thus far. I understand its an industry about what you know or how you can figure something out. But I just want to be prepared for interviews this coming fall. I'm sure being a UCLA student has its advantages such as the presence of on-campus interviews. Moreso, than I can get from my community college. I just need the direction to really make myself stand out in the crowd. Which is why i'm trying to get an early start.

It is not about the title that you have, it is about how much money that you have.

Jul 8, 2011

i'd check out the ucla career center website and try to get a gig this summer at a small regional botique, the ucla website has it fair share of jobs like that

Jul 8, 2011
Comment

It is not about the title that you have, it is about how much money that you have.

Jul 8, 2011
Comment

It is not about the title that you have, it is about how much money that you have.