Knowing what you know now, would you have pursued medical/dental school?

Rank: Baboon | 174

I wanted to get your opinions so let's start the discussion. I wouldn't go the dental school route because of what you'll be dealing on a daily basis (mouth). I do think about medical school occasionally. You'll never be out of a job. Good pay. Apart from residency, you'll be working 40-60 hrs a week. Though the ceiling is higher in finance.

Comments (16)

 
Aug 31,2017

No im someone that actually enjoys IB. Hate med so....law seems ehhh....

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Aug 31,2017

If you become a dentist, you can easily work only Monday through Thursday, and be home by 4 or 5 PM. The hours are ridiculously few, if you want them to be, and if you set up your own private practice. I also thought that it'd be nice to be a pharmacist, since 40 hour work weeks are the norm, and it's pretty easy work.

With that said, I don't think I would be able to make it through dental school. I'm pretty bad at science, especially chemistry.

 
Aug 31,2017

The distribution of MD incomes is actually huge, and a doctor's purchasing power, like anyone else's, depends on where he/she lives and works. Think about what kind of doc you want to be, and where.

 
Aug 31,2017

I've heard of a lot of mid-level lawyers/finance people sometimes wish they went to med school, especially when not in a bull market

 
Aug 31,2017

Medical school is probably the hardest professional route to take. This post doesn't take into account how impossibly difficult it is getting into a medical school to become a doctor. Maybe the route to becoming a dentist is slightly easier but becoming a doctor is hell.

The hours while in school/residency are terrible and there really aren't many people who choose the medical route simply for the salary.

No, I'm very glad I didn't choose medical school and I still feel bad for my brother who went through it.

 
Aug 31,2017

I think you're missing the part about putting in work early in life and enjoying it later. Doctors have a high salary with unmatched job security.

 
Aug 31,2017

The word "early" is tricky to gauge. The path to becoming a doctor is probably the longest and most time consuming. For bankers, in most cases, you work like a dog for a few years and then transition your role into something with a better "work-life balance". For doctors that time is tripled and you really don't feel the "enjoying life" part until you really get into your career (~40).

The job security and high pay are only there if you actually make through the process and the process is the hardest part.

 
Aug 31,2017

I agree, but if you do make it through, it is not just job security like a banker, but job security MUCH higher than a banker. So it evens out

 
Aug 31,2017

So it evens out? I guess it just depends on how important job security is to you. To me, debt from medical school and not making any money for a decade are huge cons, and I'd much rather sacrifice some job security to be able to make money during that time, instead of lose it.

 
Aug 31,2017

It is simply a risk-reward decision. Ultimately, most people would have been better off going into medicine who selected finance and all of their excuses for not wanting to put in the work are the risks they chose to take.

 
Aug 31,2017

I don't understand why you think that's true. Why isn't it the case that most people who went into medicine would have been better off going into finance? I feel like that's a far likelier scenario, where someone can't handle either the academic or financial burdens of medical school.

 
Aug 31,2017

Most of success in medicine is simply hard work and above-average intelligence. If someone was willing to put in the work and had the drive, there is no reason they couldn't make it in medicine. The fact that they are tempted by earlier money and a bit easier of a life early on with huge upside is why they often make a poor life decision for the long-term

 
Sep 30,2017

Why do you think most people would be better off?

 
Aug 31,2017

I'm repeating myself, but WHERE you end up practicing medicine - and your control over this is limited - makes a huge difference. Making $400k / year as a radiologist in Columbus Ohio is way, way different from making that in Manhattan. If you want a 7 figure income as a physician, you have to get into the absolute most competitive specialties, and that's for the privilege of being in training / doing fellowships / taking on debt well into your thirties.
Quality of life, job satisfaction, and job security are also important, and all three are probably better for physicians.

 
Best Response
Aug 31,2017

26 Broadway
where's your sense of humor?