Last Question About Non-Targets For A While (Hopefully)

So after talking to some people, I received some interesting advice. They said that for non-targets, it might be best to major in something quantitative like math or something applicable that isn't "business". They said that majoring in business may seem too common, and you'll look like every other kid who didn't get into Wharton that wants to go in finance (not just banking, but consulting, asset management, etc.). This is contrary to some peoples' opinions I've read on here that say to just major in finance to show that you know business knowledge.

What do you guys think is best?

Comments (8)

Oct 30, 2009

Transferring to a target is best.

Oct 30, 2009

no, good gpa trumps it...do business or some patty cake major and get a 3.8+...it'll help...

doing math runs the risk of you not only having bad school brand, but bad GPA as well...

and get started on acctg as early as possible...financial statement analysis is critical and the earlier the start, the better

Oct 30, 2009

I would recommend against that unless you have a strong interest in the field and can still mix in a healthy amount of finance and accounting courses. Fact is, whether many non-target students major in business or not is irrelevant - fact is, many target students do NOT major in business and personally, if I'm coming from a non-target, I'd rather compete against other non-targets, rather than students of target schools. Separate yourself from target school students, then work on stepping up in clubs, picking up internship experience through your acct/fin knowledge (many boutiques and other shops will want students that have a fin/acct background so that they know they can hit the ground running a bit easier and without training - I'm speaking in terms of small semester internships that could offer some sound experience) and separate yourself from both target and non-target students - also, of course, keep your GPA up as high as possible.

For a bit more on the subject, you can check this out: http://www.bankonbanking.com/2009/09/27/picking-yo...
Good luck.

IBanker
www.BankonBanking.com
[email protected]
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Oct 31, 2009
BankonBanking:

I would recommend against that unless you have a strong interest in the field and can still mix in a healthy amount of finance and accounting courses. Fact is, whether many non-target students major in business or not is irrelevant - fact is, many target students do NOT major in business and personally, if I'm coming from a non-target, I'd rather compete against other non-targets, rather than students of target schools. Separate yourself from target school students, then work on stepping up in clubs, picking up internship experience through your acct/fin knowledge (many boutiques and other shops will want students that have a fin/acct background so that they know they can hit the ground running a bit easier and without training - I'm speaking in terms of small semester internships that could offer some sound experience) and separate yourself from both target and non-target students - also, of course, keep your GPA up as high as possible.

For a bit more on the subject, you can check this out: http://www.bankonbanking.com/2009/09/27/picking-yo...
Good luck.

IBanker
www.BankonBanking.com
[email protected]
Interview Prep, Resume Revisions, and the New Survival Guide - The most common interview questions and answers revealed!
News, Articles, Products, Services and More - Stop by Now!

In your link it says that non-targets could major in math, but it seems like everyone here says stick to business, so I guess I'll have to go with that.

Btw, I'm not doing that well in my accounting class. I'm by no means failing, but the nature of accounting (it seems to be focused on memorizing a lot of information and regulations) is not at all where my strengths lie. I have never been able to do well in classes that require memorization, so that's why I have a B in accounting right now. If I do well in my other upper-level courses (I'm still a sophomore so I have time to get my GPA up), will a couple of Bs in accounting destroy me? I understand accounting is important in terms of understanding where certain things on the balance sheets come from, but will not doing well in a couple of accounting classes hurt that badly?

Oct 31, 2009
BankonBanking:

I would recommend against that unless you have a strong interest in the field and can still mix in a healthy amount of finance and accounting courses. Fact is, whether many non-target students major in business or not is irrelevant - fact is, many target students do NOT major in business and personally, if I'm coming from a non-target, I'd rather compete against other non-targets, rather than students of target schools. Separate yourself from target school students, then work on stepping up in clubs, picking up internship experience through your acct/fin knowledge (many boutiques and other shops will want students that have a fin/acct background so that they know they can hit the ground running a bit easier and without training - I'm speaking in terms of small semester internships that could offer some sound experience) and separate yourself from both target and non-target students - also, of course, keep your GPA up as high as possible.

For a bit more on the subject, you can check this out: http://www.bankonbanking.com/2009/09/27/picking-yo...
Good luck.

IBanker
www.BankonBanking.com
[email protected]
Interview Prep, Resume Revisions, and the New Survival Guide - The most common interview questions and answers revealed!
News, Articles, Products, Services and More - Stop by Now!

In your link it says that non-targets could major in math, but it seems like everyone here says stick to business, so I guess I'll have to go with that.

Btw, I'm not doing that well in my accounting class. I'm by no means failing, but the nature of accounting (it seems to be focused on memorizing a lot of information and regulations) is not at all where my strengths lie. I have never been able to do well in classes that require memorization, so that's why I have a B in accounting right now. If I do well in my other upper-level courses (I'm still a sophomore so I have time to get my GPA up), will a couple of Bs in accounting destroy me? I understand accounting is important in terms of understanding where certain things on the balance sheets come from, but will not doing well in a couple of accounting classes hurt that badly?

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Oct 31, 2009

Double major. The fact is that at a lot of non-targets the business students are the dumbest, and people know it. Double major in something difficult to prove how smart you are.

Oct 31, 2009

Shoot for a business major if that's what you are interested in, but take Honor's or MBA level classes if possible to show your GPA isn't inflated and that you are truly interested in this.

Nov 1, 2009
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