Long notice period makes me unattractive to recruiters

hi all, I was pretty desperate for a job so landed up in my current role where my notice period is 3 months. It's so long that many recruiters are turned off by it and tell me that no one would wait for me for that long.

Any strategies to help me out? I considered negotiating with my boss, but wouldn't that just let him know that I have the intention to leave?

Thanks.

Comments (27)

Feb 13, 2019

3 months is ridiculous notice. Even executives are usually 1 month with another month or two of soft transition/wrap up. There's no way they expect anyone to hold to that?!

Feb 14, 2019
m_1:

3 months is ridiculous notice. Even executives are usually 1 month with another month or two of soft transition/wrap up. There's no way they expect anyone to hold to that?!

Thanks, but it is in my contract? How can I get around it.

Feb 13, 2019

See a lawyer.

Feb 13, 2019

Give your notice now, then youll have 3 months to find a job lol

Feb 14, 2019
SSJ_Trunks:

Give your notice now, then youll have 3 months to find a job lol

And if I end up without a job?

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Feb 13, 2019

You take a planned vacation and continue searching.

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Feb 13, 2019

i would suggest saying that "you think your notice is just 2 weeks" (and then after you get the offer, tell your new employer "oops, it turns out i have a 3-month notice period...i hope that's not a problem")

Or, just ignore the notice period completely...and quit after you get a new job. If you are not a senior level person, i doubt they will care anyway. The longer lockup period is important for some senior level positions...but for most juniors (aka....you), its irrelevant and they just didn't bother changing the contract language out of laziness. They will not care. You are not required to tell your former employer why you are quitting, where you are going, or anything else. you can just walk in one day and say to your boss "i am resigning today...thanks for the opportunity....take care..good bye"

If they were firing you, believe you me...that's all they would say to you
"you are fired, please exit the building immediately"

There is zero reason to give a company more that they would give to you.

The situation is different if you are relatively senior, and if you have significant compensation that can be clawed back if you break the terms of your contract. However, for junior people, i doubt this is an issue. I've seen portfolio managers at hedge funds with millions of comp at risk...so they will sit on a beach for a year before taking a role at a new firm. If that is your situation, then respect your contract.

just google it...you're welcome

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Feb 13, 2019

In a similar boat with a 2 month notice period on my end and interviewing right now. Not sure how it is at your firm, but where I work currently once you hand in your resignation letter, you basically cut all ties with the firm in regards to showing up or working on any and all projects (you pretty much get paid to sit at home). Personally, I might sit around at home for 2 weeks and then ignore the remaining 6 weeks and start at wherever I end up. It's a risk but I don't think anyone is really going to go crazy about enforcing a notice period for an analyst

Feb 13, 2019

especially if you don't update your linkedin...and if you don't have to register for series 7, 63, 65 with the new firm, etc...then how would they even find out? and, more importantly...do you think they will be looking? Hell no....5 minutes after you walk out the door, they will forget your name.

just google it...you're welcome

Most Helpful
Feb 14, 2019
faceslappingcompilation:

i would suggest saying that "you think your notice is just 2 weeks" (and then after you get the offer, tell your new employer "oops, it turns out i have a 3-month notice period...i hope that's not a problem")

Or, just ignore the notice period completely...and quit after you get a new job. If you are not a senior level person, i doubt they will care anyway. The longer lockup period is important for some senior level positions...but for most juniors (aka....you), its irrelevant and they just didn't bother changing the contract language out of laziness. They will not care. You are not required to tell your former employer why you are quitting, where you are going, or anything else. you can just walk in one day and say to your boss "i am resigning today...thanks for the opportunity....take care..good bye"

If they were firing you, believe you me...that's all they would say to you
"you are fired, please exit the building immediately"

There is zero reason to give a company more that they would give to you.

The situation is different if you are relatively senior, and if you have significant compensation that can be clawed back if you break the terms of your contract. However, for junior people, i doubt this is an issue. I've seen portfolio managers at hedge funds with millions of comp at risk...so they will sit on a beach for a year before taking a role at a new firm. If that is your situation, then respect your contract.

dude, that would just piss them off and make them rescind the offer....

Also, I have stock options in my present firm so don't wish to breach the contract.

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Feb 13, 2019

you should check the language on those stock options...usually they vanish if you leave the firm before they vest.

just google it...you're welcome

Feb 15, 2019

Agree with this. I had a one year notice and if you're willing to pay me not to work for a year you can find me on a beach somewhere in Southeast Asia.

Typically relates to more senior positions, I'd say get the job first (perhaps it's not in the same industry/function). Never at a competitor, always as looking to build your career, to do something different.

If you're senior, you'll go to court in which they'll run you dry or you have to be prepared for them to cut you loose at any point. Ie have a good attorney, have some $ saved up, & make sure your next gig is solid.

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Feb 17, 2019
kimbo:

Never at a competitor, always as looking to build your career, to do something different.

Can you explain this part? Why not a competitor?

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Feb 15, 2019

My basic scenario is 3 month garden leave, plus 12 month non-solicit, of both clients and employees. Crippling me, for all intents and purposes. Except for inbound calls, which I would get all day long, if I quit.

If I need to leave, I'm moving to CA immediately, where they will invalidate all of this bullshit. That's the only state I'm aware of that basically ignores employer protections relating to non-solicit and similar. Sucks donkey balls for me to be there now, but I will take advantage of that if I need to.

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Feb 17, 2019

Forgive my ignorance on the issue, but what is wrong with just taking a 'year-long vacation' with the family (assuming you have funds to do so)? Would everyone just assume that you got canned anyways?

Could you instead just do some non-profit/entrepreneurial/consulting gigs for a year, and then just claim that you really miss the thrill of the job and are looking to get back into it?

Feb 15, 2019
Unreturned Videotapes:

Forgive my ignorance on the issue, but what is wrong with just taking a 'year-long vacation' with the family (assuming you have funds to do so)?

You only earn your salary while on garden leave, which is a small portion of total comp. A year long vacation sounds like hell to me.

Unreturned Videotapes:

Would everyone just assume that you got canned anyways?

No. I would only be leaving for another job, so the trigger would be my quitting. Also, the garden leave is only a few months and you are technically still an employee of the firm you quit, even though you don't come into the office.

Unreturned Videotapes:

Could you instead just do some non-profit/entrepreneurial/consulting gigs for a year, and then just claim that you really miss the thrill of the job and are looking to get back into it?

Once again, the garden leave gets triggered when I quit. The non-solicit provisions just makes it less appealing for another firm to hire me. Obviously, people leave firms, so it's not impossible.

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Feb 18, 2019

I would look into the non compete clause --- a lot of those don't actually hold up in court.

Talk to a non-compete lawyer

Feb 15, 2019
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