LSE MSc Finance or LBS MFA

Hi all,

Background:
- UG in Management from semi-target in UK (High 2:1)
- Experience at BB in investment management
- Secured SA offer at a BB for summer 2019
- GMAT: 700

Which programme would you say is better from an academic point of view?

Having been lucky enough to get a summer internship out of undergrad I am not looking to do a master's to get my foot into the industry, i.e. the careers services offered are not important to me. I am really just looking for an intellectual challenge.

Thanks in advance!

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Comments (22)

Nov 12, 2018

Since you're looking for an academic challenge, I would highly recommend going for the LSE programme. Depending on how serious you really are about going into depth, you might want to take a closer look at the LSE MSc Finance and Economics.

LBS programmes can generally more be seen as very applied and less theoretic whereas LSE always aims to have a focus on the theoretical foundations (although the LSE MSc Finance also has a significant portion of more applied content)

    • 1
Nov 12, 2018

Many thanks for your reply!

I guess what I was trying to say is that I am primarily looking to learn vs get a job.

The F&E programme looks really interesting. Unfortunately, it is unlikely I will be considered by the admissions committee as I didn't study a quantitative subject in my UG.

Nov 12, 2018

Also last time I checked you needed a first to be eligible for the Finance and eco programme, correct if my wrong though

In your case, I would suggest you to go to LSE, much more 'intellectual' and academic oriented than LBS. LBS is a great school that opens many doors and give you access to top tier 1 companies and jobs. LSE also gives you this but it is more aimed at developing PhD candidates than LBS if you want to pursue that path it's easier at LSE. This is my opinion, and it's based on what you say you want to do, if I had 2 offers from those programmes I would go to LBS because of the exit opps in IB

    • 1
Nov 12, 2018

Any further insights?

Nov 12, 2018

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Nov 12, 2018

B u m p

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Jan 1, 2019

LSE from an academic point of view as others have said

    • 1
Nov 12, 2018

What about prestige? Which one would you pick if you had to choose? Thanks

Most Helpful
Jan 1, 2019

I think the two institutions, LSE and LBS, are somewhat similar in terms of prestige (for a career in finance, in academia LSE wins no doubt). For the two programmes, I'd lean towards LSE MSc Finance though, because it's LSE's flagship programme (for finance) and it has been around for a long time, whereas LBS' flagship programme is the MBA.

    • 2
Feb 25, 2019

I'd say that LBS, under the academic/PhD/faculty point of view for the MFA is the best choice.

But mate, if you want better exposure to global markets, though I would advice you to take a look at LSE's MSc Risk and Finance (former Risk and Stochastic), Oxford's Financial Math, Imperial's Financial Engineering and RM, UCL's MSc in Computational Finance or Cass's Math Trading and Finance... Definitely better academic experience than the plain vanilla finance courses!

Ngl, I met a few ppl at AC coming from plain vanilla finance courses and they didn't even know how to program (and I'm not talking about Matlab, but classic VBA) or how to compute basic log norm return, to say few

Nov 12, 2018

Thanks a lot for your comment.

While I would be attracted by the challenge those courses would pose, I am afraid my background in business administration would prevent me from being accepted, and more importantly thriving in those courses.

I also considered the MSc Finance and Economics at LSE and have it as my second choice course in my application. However, I doubt I would even be considered due to my non-quantitative undergrad.

I guess I would have liked a course with a broader scope than just finance, to learn more about policy, the political economy etc. Or maybe I am just not attracted by the prospect of doing a MSc just for a job...