Math major/ applied math major?

IntoFinance's picture
Rank: Monkey | banana points 41

Hi,

I am currently a junior at a semi-target. For the last three years, I've been a pure math major, but am considering switching to applied math as it has become more in line with my interests. However, when I apply for quant/ quantitative trading positions next year, will my new major (should I decide to change) hurt me as it is less "prestigious" and abstract than the pure math major? I'm worried that companies will just think I am one of the many applied math majors interested in finance, as opposed to a smart math major they'd love to have.

Thanks!

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Comments (5)

Feb 4, 2010

I think companies don't usually see the difference unless you've got your PhD in some upper level math/applied math, when there is a real disinction between the two subject matters. I know what you're saying because there are some topics in pure math that have more credentials in academics (real analysis, topology, abstract geomtry, etc) but as an undergraduate degree-holder you will probably not use any of those knowledge at your workplace. And regardless of the major you have, if you cannot answer a simple question in probabilities or statistics you'll get immediately dinged because math(applied or not) majors are usually expected to be quick in arithmetics, probabilities.

Feb 4, 2010

Okay, thanks for the advice.....

If I change from Math to Applied Math, I'll pretty much the same, except I'll be taking Numerical Methods instead of Topology (which isn't very exciting for me) in my senior year. So it's pretty similar.

Feb 4, 2010

haha yeah. the same reason I chose applied math over pure math. I'll be taking computational finance instead of real analysis. While people say analysis can be fun, I'd be more willing to do data analysis or something related to time series.

Feb 4, 2010

Major in stats and learn some stochastic calculus and differential equations. Much more useful.

Feb 4, 2010