MBA - Kellogg vs Yale vs Cornell Go!

DietCoke's picture
Rank: Monkey | 36

Hey guys, I have the fortune to be accepted to these programs and would appreciate some honest feedback on which school to spend my next two years

Background:
late 20s upon matriculation, 4 years in 2nd/3rd tier consulting (big 4), public university engineering undergrad

Plans:
Short term: To either move into IB or into strat. consulting
Long term: entrepreneurship in China (am chinese american)

Basically I would like to know the recruitment of IB and consulting here and am looking for devil's advocate on why I should choose Cornell or Yale over Kellogg.

I know Kellogg might be the obvious choice for it's "m7" status, but I personally feel my chances at IB would be stronger at Yale, and I think either Yale or Cornell can get me to my goals of MBB or BB. The reason I don't choose Kellogg in a heartbeat is because Yale and Cornell (for better or worse) are perceived higher in East Asia for the general mass. I know you guys might be saying "yes but that's only to people who don't matter, i.e. people who aren't in the business community". But the thing is I want to start or partner for entrepreneurship eventually in China and most people (engineers, politicians, even business people) don't know the higher prestige of Kellogg as a business school. I also feel like Yale and Cornell are on the rise and in 10ish years will both be top 10 schools - Cornell because of it's new campus, and Yale because.. well Yale :)

So my question to you guys is, for those who attend or have attended or know people who attended Yale or Cornell - do you feel like your recruitment at BB/MBB was handicapped because you weren't at an m7 school? If so, why? i.e. was it because there was more competition for less spots? Because the quality of education was worse? Because the commute sucked more? Or were there simply less people gunning for those firms so it seemed like recruitment is less and basically if you are socially competent and put in the effort you will get it. Any input would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you!

Comments (53)

Feb 5, 2014

Just a tid bit of information to include in your decision. Yale has non-grade disclosure so you can focus more of your efforts on recruiting. Mind sharing your GPA/GMAT?

Feb 5, 2014

With Cornell, from what I've heard, sometimes you'll have to travel out to meet with recruiters - so this can be cumbersome. So this would really be between Kellogg and Yale.

I think with Kellogg, you may have fewer peers (relatively) gunning for finance vs. Yale where there's probably a lot of internal competition. Should you head back to China after some time, I think your reputation would be based more on the brand name of your firms.

Best Response
Feb 5, 2014

First of all, and I'm not trying to be an asshole, but figure out your goals. This decision is very different depending on IB vs. MBB. Once you get to school, you're not going to have enough time to go full out for both consulting and banking, so you have to figure it out sooner rather than later.

Ignoring that (hard to do), this decision is much more than the prestige of the lesser schools in China. Basically, if you want to start a business in China ~5 years after you finish your MBA, no one is going to give a shit wheter you went to SOM or Kellogg. They will care if you worked at MBB/BB versus Tier 2/Tier 2. Therefore, this should be about how you can maximize your post-MBA career to put you in the best position to do what you want to do.

On that note, Kellogg is the clear, runaway winner if your choice is consulting. They simply blow the other two schools out of the water. SOM places poorly, to be honest, at MBB, and Cornell is definitely a major step down from Kellogg or any of the other top 10 schools. Banking may be a bit more even, and my knowlege of banking recruiting isn't great, but from what I know, Yale may have a slight lead. From a quick look at the numbers, Kellogg sends 8% to IB, while SOM sends 11%. There may, however, be less students interested at Kellogg, so who knows. Cornell looks like it sends 9% to banking, although I can't find anything more specific than that.

To reiterate what I was saying before, this decision comes down to you deciding what you want to do, and figuring out the best school to get you there. Sure, the school's reputation overseas could be important if you plan to go over there, but at the same time, I think your job is far more important. Go to the best place to get the best first job, and let the next goal take care of itself.

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Feb 5, 2014

I will never understand people who ask a question when they already have made up their mind.

Feb 5, 2014

hey guys thanks for the comments.

yeahright: my gpa/GMAT is 3.6/740

Kanon: I've also heard the competition for finance is minimal at Yale which makes them a great feeder school for anyone interested. From a source who went to yale som, basically anyone who wanted a BB internship got it. But what you said I will definitely keep in mind.

BGP: na i don't think you're being an asshole as I completely agree with your mentality and that they are very different paths. Since I have around 8 months to decide, I will have decided by the time I start whether to pursue banking or consulting and I just wanted some unbiased input on school selection as I need to decide this around march/april before I decide on a career path. For anyone reading, if banking recruiting is pretty even at these schools I may just go with Yale.

TNA: I'm actually asking this precisely because I genuinely have not made up my mind at all. I'm sure you'll probably reply with something unrelated to my question again as it seems like there is always someone like that here.

Thanks for your input so far everyone. I sincerely appreciate it :)

Feb 5, 2014
DietCoke:

hey guys thanks for the comments.

yeahright: my gpa/GMAT is 3.6/740

Kanon: I've also heard the competition for finance is minimal at Yale which makes them a great feeder school for anyone interested. From a source who went to yale som, basically anyone who wanted a BB internship got it. But what you said I will definitely keep in mind.

BGP: na i don't think you're being an asshole as I completely agree with your mentality and that they are very different paths. Since I have around 8 months to decide, I will have decided by the time I start whether to pursue banking or consulting and I just wanted some unbiased input on school selection as I need to decide this around march/april before I decide on a career path. For anyone reading, if banking recruiting is pretty even at these schools I may just go with Yale.

TNA: I'm actually asking this precisely because I genuinely have not made up my mind at all. I'm sure you'll probably reply with something unrelated to my question again as it seems like there is always someone like that here.

Thanks for your input so far everyone. I sincerely appreciate it :)

Reply with something unrelated? You ask which program you should choose and then in the same breath you lay out a case for Cornell - Yale > Northwestern.

Feb 5, 2014

Would you mind sharing which other schools that you applied to and which round did you applied?

How strong was your undergrad, if you don't mind me asking?

Feb 5, 2014

Kellogg, hands down, is the safe/smart choice.

Look, you've already made up your mind. You'd prefer a decent career and an Ivy League education over a great career and a Big Ten school that happens to have a top 5 MBA program.

Also, if your goal is entrepreneurship in China, you don't need any sort of credentials. You just need money and a good idea. Maybe an MBA isn't what you need.

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Feb 5, 2014

For consulting, Kellogg places the best of the list. But you can still make it to MBB with any of the three schools.
I do think Cornell is picking up momentum with the $100m + numerous other donations (one was $300m donation from a Cornell alumnus) for winning the NYC bid and I could see it break into top 10 in the future

In general though, I see it as Kellogg>Cornell>Yale

Feb 5, 2014

I would also take Kellogg, between the three. I don't think you're at all disadvantaged at Kellogg for IB (I've seen them at BBs and top boutiques/independent banks) and of the three, it's got the higher ranking and more flexibility/visibility on the variety of recruiters. Should you go in for your MBA, your priorities may change - you may decide after a summer banking isn't for you and you want to go back to consulting or something else. I think in that regard, Kellogg would provide more options.

Of the three it is definitely the highest ranked in US. And again, for Asia (unless it's like the big three HSW), I think your credibility comes a lot more from the reputation of your work experience.

Feb 5, 2014

thetwohacker: also applied to chicago (dinged), michigan (accepted), and carnegie (accepted). undergrad is from a non northwestern big 10 school

illiniprogrammer: thanks for the feedback bro. you're right I think I'm placing too much emphasis on what the "typical" person thinks of my degree, when in reality it doesn't really matter. Leaning towards Kellogg based on your guys' overall feedback. also I did fail at something entrepreneurial in the past and hope to have the opportunity to fail again in the future. You're right I don't need a MBA, but I'm a semi-coward and feel like going the more conservative route.

Brian011: I agree with you, and do think both cornell and yale are both on the rise. Interested to see how the nyc tech campus will go as I would've applied to that if I had another year. However for my next two years this probably won't be in affect. Another point for Kellogg.

Kanon: really good point, if I were to do a career switch my second year Kellogg would be the more versatile/stronger choice. Being in a 2nd/3rd tier consulting firm right now I do feel like I would enjoy strat consulting, but cannot say for sure that I would enjoy finance. I would like to do an internship in IB or IM though to really see.

Thanks for the feedback guys, this actually truly helps my decision as most of my friends don't really know about business schools (and I'd like to keep my friends that way..) and would probably just say go yale/cornell/NW based on their own alma mater or favorite city. Love the objective comments.

Feb 5, 2014

If MBB is your goal, you should definitely go to Kellogg. I had a friend who attended Yale SOM recently who said MBB outcomes are not great. On the other hand, Kellogg is one of the strongest schools in terms of placement to MBB.

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Feb 5, 2014

Ok. So you are looking for something outside of the Big Ten and the Midwest for grad school. I get it. I disagree, but I get it.

I say wait a year, develop some new fun hobbies, and reapply to the M7 if it's important enough to you. Make sure you put in apps at Columbia and MIT. I think you might be competitive there if you're competitive at Kellogg. Wharton may also be possible too.

Otherwise, I think Kellogg is a great choice.

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Feb 5, 2014

Kellogg far and away if your goal is MBB- outside of HBS and Stanford, it's probably the best school for strategy consulting there is from a recruiting standpoint.

If you want to do investment banking, the three schools are a lot more even. You have to look at which banks recruit there or a LinkedIn Execu|Search to see if recent alums work at the banks you're interested in. I would think Cornell has the best alumni network in finance in NYC (not sure how close the interaction is between Yale SOM and Yale College alums). That said, Yale has an incredible new campus, its name is known throughout the world and Yale places very well size-adjusted in IB and university endowments/institutional investing. If you are looking to do your own business down the road, not sure if any of this will matter (a good idea and good co-founders are a lot more important),

Feb 9, 2014

I spoke with someone during the IB recruiting process who is a Johnson alum. She stated that class of 2013 was "very successful" because they had 22 students land banking jobs. That's really fantastic, but doesn't compare to how strong Yale is (over 30-40 land banking internships year over year). I'm sure the Johnson network is super strong, but... meh. Don't know many choosing Cornell > Yale for banking these days.

Mar 24, 2014
GMEN00:

I spoke with someone during the IB recruiting process who is a Johnson alum. She stated that class of 2013 was "very successful" because they had 22 students land banking jobs. That's really fantastic, but doesn't compare to how strong Yale is (over 30-40 land banking internships year over year). I'm sure the Johnson network is super strong, but... meh. Don't know many choosing Cornell > Yale for banking these days.

google "investment banking". see what business school pops up on the list first.

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Feb 6, 2014

I think the biggest question here (and sorry if you stated this already and I missed this detail) is how sure you think you are about returning to China to start a business.

The reason I'm saying that is, I totally understand where you are coming from when you say that the names of Yale / Cornell are widely recognized in China, whereas Northwestern isn't. If your primary goal was to get a good BB/MBB job in the U.S. or even in China, I would agree with everyone here that Kellogg should be your choice. However, I am somewhat familiar with the Chinese environment, and I don't underestimate the power of the simple name of the school you went to in the U.S. in the business setting in China, unless it's the business environment filled with ex-pats / people who went to school or worked in the U.S. For most business people, you will be just seen as a Yale/Cornell/Northwestern graduate, not an MBA graduate from SOM/Johnson/Kellogg.

If you are not so certain about returning to China in a relatively short term window for your own business, I'd say Kellogg should be your choice. But if you are very certain that you will be returning within a few years, then I would say reach out to professionals who have been in your shoes. (those who grew up / studied in America, got similar degrees, and eventually returned to China for business) They will have much better insights

Feb 6, 2014

illiniprogrammer: yes one of my reasons is to do school outside the midwest :) Judging by your name I see that you went to uofi for compsci/engineering - great department and very underrated to the general mass. Thanks for your comments and I think I'll accept one of the offers this year. (one of the reasons I didn't gun for Columbia/Sloan/Wharton is that I heard they don't really go for big 4 types and unfortunately i'm not an underrepresented minority)

Louis: Yeah the general sense I get is consulting -> Kellogg. Banking -> more even footing. I've already made my deposit at cornell but I still have some time to decide. I think the first thing is for me to decide if I should pursue consulting or banking soon. If anyone knows of people who thinks that going for both is doable the first year let us know. Otherwise I will prob just choose one path to focus on.

another_consultant: agree with you, as a chinese american I know the parent institution carries far more weight than the business school even among business communities which is why i have this dilemma. Although I am pretty americanized, I am certain I will go eventually. Although in the next 2 years or 5 years I am not sure. I will definitely heed your advice and reach out to veterans who have been in my situation.

Thanks for the comments guys. I think in the end my decision path is: first decide if I want to pursue consulting or banking. If consulting -> go kellogg. If banking -> reach out to more alums who work in china to see their perspective on "brand". If kellogg carries equal weight in most business circles then -> go kellogg. If not then -> go cornell/yale. Overall looks like I'm most likely to choose kellogg but we will see.... Thanks again yall.

Feb 6, 2014

Also just to add for context, the "business community" in china is much different than in the states. whereas the business community here is mostly composed of highly educated in top school who went to top jobs, the business community in china might be composed of former countryside/farmers/labor workers who went entrepreneurial/into politics along with the typical elite school/job crowd because of the recent economic development of china. If I were to partner with these types further down the road (and there are a lot of these newly rich types...), the parent institutions of ivy leagues are much more well known and give me a much larger perceived cock. So for me this is a true dilemma and I'm not just trolling threads to confirm what I already have chosen. So far the general consensus is to go Kellogg and I think that's where I lean now too.

Feb 6, 2014

@DietCoke, stop and think about this:

Your thesis is that by attending Cornell over Kellogg, you will be best positioned to be a successful entrepreneur in China in the long-term.

I have done limited business in China, but you're saying that the incremental prestige associated with Cornell vs. Kellogg in China will be the differentiator that enables you to secure a partner or win business 10+ years after school. Above personal connections, quality of your content, past business experience, and knowledge... that having Cornell on your resume (rather than Kellogg) will be the factor that enables you to succeed. So much so that you're willing to risk substantially worse near-term job prospects, perceived prestige in the U.S., quality of alumni, etc.?

Do you realize how insane that sounds? If you have personal reasons for not wanting to go to Kellogg, by all means attend Cornell. But from a career perspective, you're setting yourself up for failure.

Not to distract from the main question, but, to address your second point, getting a job at MBB is hardly a walk in the park. It is far from being "competent" and going through the motions. A BB job is significantly easier to obtain. If you're at an M7, it IS a matter of being competent and going through the motions. Can't speak to how it is at Cornell.

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Feb 6, 2014

What @CompBanker said.

I really think you need to take a large step backwards and think about what you want to do, both short and long term. Then actually talk to people that do those things and have taken that path, and determine what you need to do. I feel like you're probably a smart guy that really hasn't thought through much of anything. You applied to seemingly random schools, most of which are concentrated in the midwest, despite a desire to get out of the midewst. You want IB or Consulting, two very different paths. And you already put down a deposit at Cornell, even though you evidently haven't fully thought through the decision and figured out what is actually best for you.

Seriously dude, it's time for a major reassessment. I'm thoroughly impressed that you managed to get into three great schools without much direction, but I would also decide if you want what these schools offer. To me, the choice is obvious, but I'm not you. Go to Kellogg and you'll have a great shot at MBB and BB, plus the best name brand in the US. As I stated and others have echoed, the years between your MBA and going to China will be far more important than your school's name. Maximize that first.

Feb 6, 2014

Yes you guys are right I haven't thought things through enough in terms of what I want to do for sure as consulting and banking are very different careers. (of course I did not state this in my app essays) Although I believe many people pre-mba don't really know either from my discussions, unless they are sponsored.

I would be happy gunning for consulting at MBBB or boutique - I more want to do an internship in IB just to really know, and I believe that's the value of a 2 year MBA is that you have that internship option.

Regardless I think my decision will be to attend kellogg. Thanks everyone for the feedback!

Feb 6, 2014

Two summers ago, I was at a joint birthday party for two roommates who happened to have it on the same week. One was my friend (at a marketing firm), the other was a Wharton MBA who was interning in banking. She invited all of her Wharton friends to the party, and, as it turns out, like five of them were consultants at Deloitte before that.

I don't think Wharton would be all that much of a longshot for a Big Four consultant with strong recs.

But what's done is done, and you don't want to wait another year for school. So my vote is for Kellogg, and, like everyone else here, I am not going to affirm a decision for #10-20 YSOM or Cornell over #5 Kellogg.

I'd take Kellogg. I know it's a Big Ten school, but MBA programs tend to have a lot more national and even international diversity than undergrad does. Especially at Northwestern. Your network at Kellogg will be an effective superset of what your network would be at YSOM or Cornell.

Feb 6, 2014

@IlliniProgrammer I can echo exactly what you said. I know a TON of ex-Deloitte people at Wharton. Columbia has no issue with Big 4, and is honestly an easier school to get into (IMO) than Kellogg. As you said, however, I don't think you want to wait and apply another year when you're already in to some good schools.

@DietCoke I agree with what you're saying that a lot of people don't know really what they want to do. I tend to expect people to know exactly what their path will be, but that's probably a bit unrealistic. However, since you really don't know what you want to do, that is all the more reason to go to the highest ranked school (which it sounds like you're now leaning towards). To be honest, these schools are not really in the same tier. It's not like your choosing Kellogg vs. CBS, where it's general opinion as to which is better (and certainly a debate for another place and time). I also don't believe that SOM and Cornell are "on the rise". People have been saying that about Yale for years, but I just don't see it.

I think you'll be in good shape at Kellogg, and have a huge amount of options available to you. Plus, you'll easily be able to get out of Chicago post-MBA, so that should meet that need as well.

Feb 6, 2014

We're like 20 posts deep with resounding Northwestern support and he is still arguing against Northwestern.

Just go to Yale or Cornell. Both good schools. I just don't understand the logic. You are currently at a lower tier consulting firm. Your goal should be to go to whatever school is the best at setting your up for MBB consulting or top tier banking.

Cornell is in the middle of nowhere. Check that off your list.

Yale is Yale, but the business school is new and just starting to build out. You are close enough to NYC so at least you have some location benefit.

Northwestern is the better school all around. Better when it comes to consulting by a lot and the lower banking placements are most likely a function of the fact that students choose NW because it crushes it with consulting.

Focus on the brand name job and what school will set you up the best, not what some provincial Chinese guy will think.

Feb 6, 2014

Go to Kellogg and don't look back. I'd go with Cornell as 2nd choice.

"I also feel like Yale and Cornell are on the rise and in 10ish years will both be top 10 schools"

funny because people have been saying this for the last ten years.

In all my recruiting with top banks and consulting firms I don't think I've ever run into anyone with a Yale MBA. I'm sure they are out there somewhere but not the people I met. Kellogg students are more accomplished in my opinion. Also, Kellogg has a better alumni network. Unfortunately, you probably won't be able to use the Yale College network because, well, how do I put this lightly, many college alums still laugh at the MBA program and are more dedicated to their own MBA program or to undergrads.

Feb 6, 2014

@finance_king Totally agreed. I think what people tend to forget when proclaiming one school is on the rise and will be in the top 10 is that some school has to fall out, and decline. For Yale and Cornell to both make it, two schools have to drop down. It just isn't happening, at least not any time soon (and a consensus, not just in one dumbass random newspaper ranking). Doesn't mean that they aren't good schools, it's just an argument that annoys me.

Feb 6, 2014

i say go to Kellogg so there's an extra spot for a waitlister like me :)

Feb 6, 2014

Just curious, why did you apply to Kellogg?

Feb 6, 2014

Interesting discussion here..

@ Compbanker:

You mention MBB is harder to get out of MBA than BB banking. Is that due to the rigorous case interviews that an applicant needs to pass to get one of these offers? Or is it because MBB consulting hires fewer people compared to BB banking?

Btw, I do think that the case interviews at top consulting firms are tougher to nail compared to most banking interviews. But, I was under the impression that getting an interview at a BB was tougher than getting an interview at MBB to begin with, so I was thinking the level of difficulty in getting an offer from either would 'equal' out.

Feb 6, 2014

I don't know what @CompBanker is seeing at Booth, but here at Sloan MBB consulting is FAR more sought after than BB IBD. As a result, tons of folks apply to MBB whereas few apply to BBs, sending the supply and demand out of whack.

Feb 7, 2014
kingfalcon:

I don't know what @CompBanker is seeing at Booth, but here at Sloan MBB consulting is FAR more sought after than BB IBD. As a result, tons of folks apply to MBB whereas few apply to BBs, sending the supply and demand out of whack.

interesting... Is that real? Do you happened to know why MBB is a more desired career path compared to banking at MBA programs?

Is that because of the perceived notion that MBB consulting has better exit options compared to BB banking at associate level?

Feb 7, 2014

thanks for the feedback guys. as I exactly mentioned many posts ago I have decided to go Kellogg. hamm0 and anyone else's comments that still believe i'm really opposed to going to kellogg, i think i've already addressed this.

Although I would love further discussion about the different bschool regardless. West Coast Analyst - hope you are able to take my spot and good luck!

I also believe, similar to Sloan, that BB interest is small at Kellogg so the competition would be a lot less. I'm sure recruiters also factor this in, but I'd imagine BB would also love to have kellogg alums join their firms.

Feb 7, 2014
DietCoke:

thanks for the feedback guys. as I exactly mentioned many posts ago I have decided to go Kellogg. hamm0 and anyone else's comments that still believe i'm really opposed to going to kellogg, i think i've already addressed this.

Yes, but we still need to have WSO's Tuck acolytes show up and claim their school is ten times better than HBS and that you should forget about Kellogg and apply there next year. This hasn't happened yet, so the MBA thread is not finished. I have gotten my plug in for midwestern/Big Ten schools so we can check that box off, but the Tuck folks haven't harassed you yet.

Feb 7, 2014

@IlliniProgrammer I clearly failed to do my job. Give me time and I'll come up with a five-point plan for why OP should scrap all of this and apply to Tuck and only Tuck. It's the only answer to his problems.

Feb 7, 2014

Am I the only one that thinks this entire thread is nonsense? How people make it to adulthood and still rely on the opinions of strangers to make decisions is startling.

Feb 7, 2014

Some people are uninformed. I am often less informed about decisions that I need to make than other people are. OP is getting advice, not letting other people make decisions for him.

If adults had all the answers, they wouldn't ask questions.

Feb 7, 2014

Informing someone is providing facts and anecdotes, not telling them what decision to make. Maybe my previous comment was too extreme but the thread as a whole certainly has that feel.

Feb 7, 2014

going concern - I rely on the opinion of unbiased strangers precisely because they can give an unbiased stranger perspective. If I asked my family they would say go Ivy league because they don't understand the situation. My friends would say whatever fitted their own alma mater desires. I don't think this is dissimilar to a corporate team at a company hiring an unbiased "stranger" consulting firm even though they might have no internal workings of the company.

a lot of ppl on this site are douchebags or undergrads who watched too many wall street movies, but a lot are also established professionals who have been there done that and are willing to give great informed opinions - this is the value I hope for and I believe I have received it. Also, what defines "adulthood", I believe even when we're middle aged we will still need objective opinions from many times strangers to keep us on track and off any high horse.

also, what's tuck?

Feb 7, 2014

I don't want to keep arguing here but I think you're grossly mistaken if you think anyone's opinion on here is unbiased, not to even touch on the uncertain reliability of one person's opinion vs another. You have no idea what is going on inside anyone else's head but yours.

Feb 7, 2014
DietCoke:

also, what's tuck?

Other than to say it's a great MBA program, especially for consulting, I will let BGP answer that one; I have already stepped on enough toes in this thread.

I do stand by my claim that the Tuck boosters on WSO are as passionate and as vocal as I am when it comes to discussions about schools.

Feb 7, 2014

going concern - obviously people have biases here, but doesn't mean the data points aren't valuable. yes it's dumb to follow just data points on this thread, which is why i also have opinions from a wide variety of sources outside of here. if many biased data points are summed i believe the result is a rather unbiased direction. and again, like illini was saying it's the opinions here i'm considering and valuating - not looking for others to make my decision.

anyways thanks everyone for your opinions, i'm going to move on now.

Feb 7, 2014

@GoingConcern I think you're a bit overzealous on this one. There are a lot of people on here that don't know anything (maybe I'm one of them sometimes) and still try to give advice. At the same time, there are a lot of people that do have decent knowledge of the topic at hand. In this case, they have applied, gotten in, gone, or are going to peer institutions to those that OP asked about, and further, work at some of the organizations that he referred to.

Are people biased? Of course, but if they provide factual justification for their perspective, then it's still valuable for the OP. Pointing to actual recruiting numbers from each of the school, as well as consensus rankings (which really aren't opinion when aggregated together through sites like P&Q), is simply calling out facts. While referring to general experience either at school or in industry is not necessarily factual, it is very valuable for people on here that have limited experience with or networks in the topic at hand.

I totally see where you're coming from. This thread has had a bit of an absurd feel the entire time. However, as someone who recently (for the first time) sought the advice of this board, and got some incredibly valuable feedback from public posts and private messages, entirely knocking the value of advice from this site is just flat wrong. A lot of people have given and received a lot of value here, even admist all the shit that fills up a large portion of the posts/content.

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Feb 7, 2014
BGP2587:

entirely knocking the value of advice from this site is just flat wrong.

That depends on what you mean by advice...what I was saying is that someone saying 'go here', 'do this', 'do that', etc should have absolutely no value to anyone. What can have value is if someone provides some data for you to use...like "I was in this situation, this was my experience, take from it what you will"...and then you use that data point (assuming you think it wasn't fabricated or embellished) along with every other data point you gather when trying to make a decision.

It's the same thing as when buyside guys read equity research reports...none of them care what the ER views are (buy, sell, hold..its all nonsense), but they do use the data and commentary within the reports to feed into a big mosaic of data from various sources when evaluating potential investment decisions.

Feb 7, 2014

i'm totally playing, i do know what Tuck is :)

Feb 7, 2014

@IlliniProgrammer I managed to resist the bait. And to your point about Tuck boosters, I don't think they're just on WSO... While probably annoying for outsiders (and at times insiders), it's definitely what leads to the loyal alumni base.

Feb 7, 2014
BGP2587:

@IlliniProgrammer I managed to resist the bait. And to your point about Tuck boosters, I don't think they're just on WSO... While probably annoying for outsiders (and at times insiders), it's definitely what leads to the loyal alumni base.

The Booth and Duke boosters on P&Q are by far the worst.

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Feb 7, 2014
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Feb 10, 2014