MBA/JD Dual Degree

Hello everyone -

I will be finishing up my degree online (COVID, and convenience).  It is from a non-target institution, so there are some drawbacks to this.  However, I have background experience that allows some exploration and added qualifications to apply into an MBA/JD program at a local institution. 

Is this worth exploring?  I want to learn about both the business understanding and understand about contracts.  I would also want to get licensed to work to give back to the community as well.  I donate and starting to participate volunteer hours for nonprofits I am passionate about.  

Is anyone here have both qualifications?  How did it work out?

Thank you.

Comments (7)

  • Associate 1 in PE - Growth
Jan 9, 2022 - 1:56am

It's a hard sell for two reasons:

1) there are no careers that explicitly use it.

2) The forgone income and experience by adding extra years of schooling given no careers use it.

I think the only situation it makes sense is you are wealthy, interested in the law, and care less about career progression. I would view it closer to a philosophy degree than something you are going to concretely use.

Jan 9, 2022 - 2:27am

Law probably has more specializations than any industry. A business contract for example in the consumer space will require professional review from a lawyer that has worked in that industry and jurisdiction. You'll learn something from getting a JD but those will just be basic skills, enough to get you a job at a big law firm. JD itself is not enough to be 100% sure you understand all of the nuances of the contract you're reading. 

If you do MBA/JD, you won't get any benefits of the MBA and instead spend hours studying on a JD instead of networking. IF you want to do a JD, get a law degree. Maybe if this is at Columbia University, I would recommend it. But my first point still stands.

Array
  • 1
Jan 11, 2022 - 7:57pm

Incoming cfa level 1 charterholder

Law probably has more specializations than any industry. A business contract for example in the consumer space will require professional review from a lawyer that has worked in that industry and jurisdiction. You'll learn something from getting a JD but those will just be basic skills, enough to get you a job at a big law firm. JD itself is not enough to be 100% sure you understand all of the nuances of the contract you're reading. 

If you do MBA/JD, you won't get any benefits of the MBA and instead spend hours studying on a JD instead of networking. IF you want to do a JD, get a law degree. Maybe if this is at Columbia University, I would recommend it. But my first point still stands.

A lot of falsehoods here.  Let's take it from the top:

1. Law has three main specializations: litigation, transactional, and regulatory (which some consider transactional).  Although the sophistication and proportion of responsibilities may vary a lot within each category (e.g. ambulance chasers are in court many times more than a commercial litigator associate who has never entered a courtroom after eight years), the skills and tasks tend to blend together.  An entertainment lawyer does not have much that is truly entertainment specific on his plate, his day-to-day is a lot like an M&A attorney.

2. Hiring an attorney for most contracts is stupid.  Most industries have standard practices and forms.  Most people will graduate law school without having read a single business contract or employment.  At most, the median exposure to a contract is reading a paragraph of one that is at issue in a mid-20th century case.  Businesses also hate attorneys in most instances unless they want to act rich like a Pimp and have an attorney on hand all the time, which is a needless cost.

3. You will learn little from a JD aside from thousands of pages of appellate law (trial is what makes up the vast majority of our legal system).  Less than 10% of new JD holders will enter big law.  Going to law school, even the lower T13, is far from sufficient to enter big law.

4. Columbia is known to be a very expensive law school.  It lacks the prestige of HYS and still costs an arm and a leg.  Columbia at sticker over Duke/UVA/Cornell at half tuition makes no sense.

Most Helpful
Jan 9, 2022 - 9:56pm

Get an MBA from the M7. Work a few years beforehand. I'm a former corporate lawyer. The profession sucks in so many ways and no one without aspergers or who has a family enjoys it. Law school is a scam, they don't teach you anything except thousands of pages of appellate cases where children drunk drive then blow up fireworks. They say they "teach you to think" to hide the lack of any substantive material. I took a number of business courses, they were way easier except the material was practical and worth studying. 

Jan 9, 2022 - 10:04pm

I'm in my mid 30s. Would doing an M7 MBA make sense given my age?

For context, I would like to start a fund or wealth firm/entrepreneurship of my own (if it's even possible, I know a few advisors who left shop to start their own firms).

Jan 11, 2022 - 7:51pm

IcedxTaro

I'm in my mid 30s. Would doing an M7 MBA make sense given my age?

For context, I would like to start a fund or wealth firm/entrepreneurship of my own (if it's even possible, I know a few advisors who left shop to start their own firms).

Starting an MBA in mid 30s?  That probably does not make sense.  There are probably a few scenarios it could be okay.

If you want to start a fund or other company, start now or work somewhere you will acquire the skills to do so.  Get going now.  Ignore the degrees.

  • VP in PE - LBOs
Jan 11, 2022 - 8:02pm

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