McKinsey Office Locations

Sam1327's picture
Rank: Chimp | 2

Differences between McKinsey US Offices

Industries and cultures vary from region to region. Regional offices will usually have consulting clients in industries that are closest in proximity.

That is, the tech, energy, financial hubs of the country will each have a regional office in their proximity. Cultures will vary from region to region, city to city. There is, of course, the overarching company culture.

  • McKinsey office NYC
    • Financial services focused
  • McKinsey office Houston
    • Energy focused
  • McKinsey office Chicago
    • Supply chain, operational, industrials

from certified user @modelcitizen1

I think you should first decide whether you want to work in the Northeast, Midwest, or South. Then you can start picking specific cities within those regions.

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Comments (25)

Jul 28, 2013

BUMP

You crave what you are not.
Dude, your perspective on life sucks.

Jul 28, 2013

Also interested.

Jul 30, 2013

Just to set expectations, having an internship at Bain does not guarantee a full time offer at McKinsey or BCG. Bain hires a lot more undergrads for it's size compared to McK/BCG (pyramid structure v. diamond structure) so it's less selective, and both BCG and McK try to hire relatively large summer classes and don't leave a lot of slots open for full time hires.

Moreover, Bain gives pretty much every summer an offer regardless of performance (I know Bain summers who were given full time offers before the internship even started so they would choose Bain over McK/BCG) so having the offer isn't worth as much if you're trying to present yourself as qualified for the jump.

That said, of the offices you listed, Atlanta is probably the least competitive to break into.

    • 2
Jul 30, 2013

Every consulting firm gives their summers a FT offer unless they show psychopathic tendencies or screw up majorly--mainly because whoever gets through the internship is usually very good. HOWEVER you shouldn't say they give out offers regardless of their performance. Because that's simply not true. There are interns at all MBB who were not asked back because of their poor performance.

Also, having an internship at any of the MBB does not guarantee a FT offer at any of the other three. MBB Cross offer at the undergrad level is a lot less common than people think.

Finally, while Bain does have a pyramid structure, it is also significantly smaller than the other two with fewer offices--even in the US. So the number if spots end up being similar to the other two, at least based on what I've heard from MBB friends who graduated this year.

P.S., if location really is the only reason the OP wants to jump ship, I'm guessing it's BCG (in addition to the fact that he calls himself an SA) because Bain doesn't have offices yet in the less popular / populous cities (such as Detroit or Minneapolis). Or, I suppose, the OP could be on the west coast and doesn't like it there.

Jul 30, 2013

I think you should first decide whether you want to work in the Northeast, Midwest, or South. Then you can start picking specific cities within those regions.

Would be happy to talk in more detail - shoot me a PM

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Jul 28, 2013

Does your exit opps/networks/type of work vary for each region?

You crave what you are not.
Dude, your perspective on life sucks.

Jul 30, 2013

Your exit opps are dependent on your studies which are dependent on your office.

For instance, you will probably have the opportunity to do more financial services studies in the NYC office. Similarly you will likely have the opportunity to do more energy studies in the Houston office. Technically your office doesn't matter, but there is always an informal aspect to the staffing model and firm leadership that know you (your network) are more likely to want to put you on their studies.

So yes this things vary from region to region and office to office, but you can create your own experience depending on how proactive you are about reaching out and getting to know people.

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Jul 30, 2013

I've heard conflicting views on how much office preference matters with respect to gaining an offer. On one end is the view that the firm has one standard: SF=CHI=DET=Timbuktu. I've heard others say that the difference between, say, SF and Cleveland is night and day. I'm guessing that the truth is somewhere in between.

Does anyone have first-hand knowledge on this? Also, if there is an easier path to Cleveland than San Francisco, where is it manifested? At the resume screen, a lower bar to advance to final rounds, or at the offer decision level? Any specific information on the McK and BCG Minneapolis offices would be helpful!

Jul 30, 2013

.

Jul 31, 2013

All these places are good, but McKinsey NY is notorious very MUCH MORE work-intensive than other cities; also, you have a harder chance to climb up the ladder in NY. I think Chicago and DC are good offices to go for shot.

Jul 30, 2013

Depends on the firm.

Nov 7, 2013

Mck Chicago = supply chain and ops.
MBB is suffering right now across the board..friends at BCG SF are running at 70% utilization on the top end...nevertheless banking ain't much better

Nov 7, 2013

I'm speaking to Bain specifically--I know there LA office is smaller...

Jul 30, 2013

.

Nov 7, 2013

^^^
Redninja is dead on.

BCG Chicago is doing and has done extremely well whereas its West Coast presence isn't that great. Bain SF and LA are both strong offices.

I don't know much about McK LA, but their Chicago office is known for a relatively tough lifestyle throughout the firm (I have heard this from BAs from nearly every McK office in the U.S.).

In the broadest generalizations, I believe Chicago is a significantly larger consulting market than LA (the aggregate size of MBB offices is much larger in Chicago, I believe). This might also translate to more local work in Chicago than LA (definitely true at BCG while McK has a lot of travel in general).

Nov 7, 2013

At least at my firm if you're in NY you'll be doing almost exclusively local financial services projects.

Nov 7, 2013

Chicago has a great mix of industries for strategy work, so you aren't pigeonholed into just one industry (although this obviously depends on how senior/junior you are in your firm, whether or not your firm specializes in a specific industry, etc.).

I'm biased because I grew up in the area, but I love Chicago. It is an amazing city especially for young professionals. There are plenty of great restaurants for foodies, lots of bars/clubs for nightlife, etc. With tons of museums, fun beaches (at least for ~3 months out of the year) and parks, awesome sports teams and more, I think there is really something for everyone. I've lived in New York as well, and I would describe Chicago as a smaller NYC without the omnipresent smell and trash. Also in my opinion, people are noticably a lot nicer.

Considering your wife's situation, it depends on what kind of school she wants to work in. Chicago Public Schools are notoriously bad, but there are similar problems in NYC and LA. If she wanted to go private or higher ed, there are certainly more attractive opportunities. Obviously, she should do some major research on these locations too to make sure she could find work suitable for her.

Good luck with the move!

TCB... you know taking care of business

    • 1
Nov 7, 2013
Enjayes:

Chicago has a great mix of industries for strategy work, so you aren't pigeonholed into just one industry (although this obviously depends on how senior/junior you are in your firm, whether or not your firm specializes in a specific industry, etc.).

I'm biased because I grew up in the area, but I love Chicago. It is an amazing city especially for young professionals. There are plenty of great restaurants for foodies, lots of bars/clubs for nightlife, etc. With tons of museums, fun beaches (at least for ~3 months out of the year) and parks, awesome sports teams and more, I think there is really something for everyone. I've lived in New York as well, and I would describe Chicago as a smaller NYC without the omnipresent smell and trash. Also in my opinion, people are noticably a lot nicer.

Considering your wife's situation, it depends on what kind of school she wants to work in. Chicago Public Schools are notoriously bad, but there are similar problems in NYC and LA. If she wanted to go private or higher ed, there are certainly more attractive opportunities. Obviously, she should do some major research on these locations too to make sure she could find work suitable for her.

Good luck with the move!

Thanks for the reply! You have one shiny banana deposited into your account.

Chicago on paper looks pretty good but I wanted an opinion from a resident like you. I'm in my mid 20's so I'd like to live around a similar demographic, mid 20's early 30's. It seems like I-90 is "the" highway, but I know nothing about the CTA. Could you give me some placement tips on train lines, widely perceived "sketchy" locations I don't want to live in, condo/duplex, vs. townhouse and so on? Any flagship neighborhoods or high-rises?

No pain, no pain.

Nov 7, 2013

I'm a bit concerned that you don't know whether your significant other is a man or a woman

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Nov 7, 2013
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