No-name university final year undergrad student, no internship experience, MSc Economic History offer from LSE - Worth it?

MonkeyMoo5's picture
Rank: Baboon | banana points 105

I am currently a final year undergrad from a Dutch University (thus not bad however also not a target by any means), got excellent study results and consequently an offer from LSE in their Economic History Msc programme. I wasn't able to do internships so far (I did volunteer in Africa in a summer however) and thus lack this probably key aspect.

Would accepting the Economic History master @ LSE be worth it if I want to break into London/Dutch/Asian banking? My undergrad study is in business with a major in finance and additional 5-month finance education through my semester abroad at HKUST, a target uni in Asia but likely unknown elsewhere.

Alternatively, I can pursue a Master in Finance & Investments at RSM in Rotterdam. This would cost me 2k and I have already been 'selected' for this.

I heartily thank anybody for their opinions. I feel honoured by LSE'soffer but very unsure if I should take it - I'd have to go into debt (although cheap debt through British and Dutch government loans) but if it does help me out I will have no problem doing so.

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Comments (5)

Dec 16, 2017

Bump

Dec 20, 2017

I would say find an internship or take a gap year finding and taking one, after that LSE EH all days. I mean, internship + semi target in UK = Job
no internship + lse = hard to find a job

Generally speaking uni means up to 30% of your CV

The name of the game, moving the money from the client's pocket to your pocket

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Dec 20, 2017

Agreed. Try and get work experience.

If you wanted Dutch banking, I'm sure RSM would suffice but for anything else, LSE has a clear edge and being one of LSE's cheaper MSc programmes (whilst still much costlier than RSM), the value for money with that makes for a good option. Additionally, one of the key strengths of doing a MSc is having the brand on your CV for life. So, if you can financially afford it, I'd go for it (this is assuming you have some interest in economic history as a subject).

Dec 16, 2017

Thanks for the answer mate! Would you say a summer internship at a finance institution doing relevant work in e.g. M&A's or analytical activities would make LSE EH worthwhile?

Furthermore, is it likely that if I defer my offer to next year it'll be accepted? Not familiar with the deferral system.

Also, should I not find an internship in The Netherlands yet still accept LSE's EH - Would this guarantee me an internship in the city after graduating? I'll be more then happy to spend 6 months in the city for valuable experience post-graduation.

Dec 23, 2017

What concert costs 45 cents? 50 Cent feat. Nickelback.

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