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Apr 20, 2017

Learn to use the search function.

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Apr 20, 2017

I went to a non-target undergrad and had a poor GPA (was facing some significant personal issues and life challenges during undergrad) and was working full time. I ended up laying low for a while at smaller boutiques while slowly climbing up until I landed at Deloitte Consulting (not strategy but technology). Once in Deloitte Consulting, I managed to network onto a strategy project. I graduated back in 2014 so it took about 2.5 years to make this happen. Granted, my first Strategy project kicked my ass, but it was a huge learning experience for me. Now I'm back on a technology consulting project. (I also managed to land an interview w/ McKinsey's technology practice last year before joining Deloitte). In a few weeks, I'm meeting w/ my first PE firm, not for a finance role, but for an Operations role. (So I truly feel like if you have the confidence, you can make anything happen), and then have another meeting during the summer time.

What you need to do is ask yourself if you truly think you're capable enough to compete with the top students from target schools. Make a tracker on Excel and browse Linkedin of the names of all the recruiters for all the strategy practices and start messaging them on Linkedin. Be humble, tell them you're interested in their roles. If you're still in school, start attending career fairs at some of the target schools. If any alumni from your school have gone onto a strategy consulting firm, network and have coffee with them.

Also make sure your skills are on point. If you went to a non-target and majored in Art/History and have no prior internship experience or strategy/finance or technology (analytics/big data) experience, it might be difficult to convince a strategy firm to take a chance on you.

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Apr 20, 2017

I will add though: Its super competitive even once you break in. Most people on my teams went to ivy league schools or top non-ivy league schools ( UVA/Berkeley/Chicago/Northwestern) and usually had top GPAs, are very dedicated Type A personalities who are all significantly smarter than I am. I think I generally have better people skills than they do and have more of a sales type personality. If you have certain qualities that stand out, make sure you communicate and share those with the people you reach out to (or let them see it for themselves). Based on my first scatter plot (ranking against my peers), I'm doing extremely well and slightly better than I expected at the firm, despite the feeling of getting constantly ass kicked around.
So just mentally prepare yourself for the challenges that come with being surrounded by super smart, hard working people. At my state school, no one was really that smart so coming to Deloitte was a huge change for me.

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Apr 20, 2017

Can you elaborate on how you got into your smaller boutique?

With so many areas in management consulting, how did you decide what fit you best? I'm currently debating which area to enter. Can you provide your thought process on how you made your decision?

Apr 20, 2017

My friend is in consulting from a non-target. You have to network, get yourself out there and do not let your grades fall below a 3.8. Also take 1 or 2 stats classes above the requirement for political science

Apr 20, 2017

At my MBB, you will basically have to network - nobody will grab a UCSB Political Science major based on resume alone. In addition to the usual outreach to alumni, I would just find out about MBB recruiting events at LA schools and crash them.

You will have to get a bit lucky, and be very polished for this to work. Some people might react poorly to you saying "I got to UCSB but I'm here at the USC event anyway" but I LOVE it because I think it shows drive.

I can't speak to going after jobs somewhere like Deloitte or Accenture; it might be much easier path.

Apr 20, 2017

I got an introduction to a partner at MBB and currently attend a non-target.

I would recommend checking out Firms Consulting and just listen to their podcasts (you can also find them on the iTunes store and on pocket casts on Android) https://www.firmsconsulting.com/
Those podcasts are a wealth of information, and a couple talk in depth about what a consulting engagement project looks like. Also, they talk a great deal about what it means to be a consultant, the kinds of skills a consultant has, and why individuals from non-targets are able to break into MBB.

Apr 20, 2017

Great

Apr 20, 2017

Just to clarify, is that an answer to my first question?

Apr 20, 2017
shewantsthadit:

I've read on here that breaking into MBB almost requires going to target schools and having a high GPA, but without as many opportunities of breaking in from a non-target as IB for example. Honestly, I'm still unsure the relationship between school "prestige" and chances at an MBB, but I'd assume with a lesser amount of firms/hiring positions semi-target schools for even IB may not even get a second look at McBainston.

How good would my odds be of getting a job at one of the tier-1 firms coming from a Big10 school like Penn State, Wisconsin, or IndianaU-Kelley? Or would it be a better idea to try to save some money and stay in-state at VT and try to transfer to UVA or apply for MFin there?

What is your year/GPA/major?

So you're thinking about transferring from Virginia Tech?

"If you always put limits on everything you do, physical or anything else, it will spread into your work and into your life. There are no limits. There are only plateaus, and you must not stay there, you must go beyond them." - Bruce Lee

Apr 20, 2017

I'm actually not in college yet, but I wanted to make a more informed decision on where to apply/go for college.

Apr 20, 2017

Getting to an MBB is going to be hard no matter where you go to school. Even at a "target," you're going to be interviewing against some really smart people. Getting in from a non-target is even tougher - you need to stand out that much more just to get an interview. Without interviews on campus, it means you need to work harder to get better grades, have betters EC's, network more with people at the firm, etc. But it isn't impossible at all - once you get the interview, you are evaluated at the same level as everyone else.

In your situation, do as @Isaiah_53_5 said. There's not much you can do right now except get into the best school you can and work hard from there. Go on LinkedIn if you want and go to the state schools to see how many alumni from there make it into MBB firms. I go to a non-target and just accepted a full-time MBB offer. It is doable. I have people in my start class that, legitimately, come from schools I have never heard of. But they worked hard and are absolutely exceptional - if you really want it, you can do that too.

What I don't recommend is going into your freshman year with the full intention to transfer. There's a great chance you transfer to a target and don't get the offer a few years down the line. Go to whatever school you choose with the intention to stay. Do well in school, make friends, get involved in extracurriculars. If you absolutely hate it, then think about transferring and apply at that point. I personally don't think it's worth not giving a school/yourself a chance because you think down the road you might want a better chance at interviewing at 2 or 3 firms.

Hope that makes sense, PM me if you have any more questions. Good luck!!!

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Apr 20, 2017

I don't think that having the work experience you have puts you above having to climb the totem pole. Just start building relationships in the industry now. Thats never a bad idea.

"The only thing I know is that I know nothing, and i am no quite sure that i know that." Socrates

Apr 20, 2017

With the focus shifting to Asia, an asian Jamie Dimon (Tuft alumn) would be a smart move. Mandarin will take you far. Do you already speak it by any chance? I took it from 6th-11th grade and now I'm a soph. strongly considering consulting; maybe I should start re-taking Chinese again...

Apr 20, 2017

i've had experience with it at home but never became fluent speaking-wise. mandarin would be useful but in consulting/banking you have to be completely fluent for most positions, which is hard to achieve unless you spend time in a country where you speak the language on a day-to-day basis...that being said mandarin in college takes up a LOT of time. its not hard but a lot of busy work...i find that i spend more time on my chinese class memorizing chinese phrases and such than a lot of my other classes. but tufts is an internationally-focused school...language classes are hard in general here, not too sure about other schools.

Apr 20, 2017

Kill the GMAT, work super hard to get a good job (something either really unique/interesting, or at a blue chip firm), then nail applications to top b-schools for a re-brand. If you can find a job with any smaller consulting boutiques, that might also help. Read and memorize "Case in Point" too.

Apr 20, 2017

sleep with hiring managers

    • 1
Apr 20, 2017
CaliforniaAnalyst:

sleep with hiring managers

haha, If only it was that easy

Apr 20, 2017

Duke, UVA, Wake Forest all have masters in management programs that you should take a look at.

Apr 20, 2017

I'm kind of in the same position, so any help would be appreciated from me as well...

Apr 20, 2017

wtf? why throw monkey shit to my sage advice?

seriously, one of my friends's gf slept with many people she thought who could help. she did that since her 1st internship at ml branch office and all the way to vp at bb. and she ended up at a bb's tmt group despite some major weakness on resume (sub par gpa, 2.9ish)

so it's very doable and the matter is only to find the right people

Apr 20, 2017

Top 10 MBA.

Apr 20, 2017

Nowadays everywhere people look for certified consultants. Hence try to obtain it to continue your career with.

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Apr 20, 2017

What do you mean by certified? Certified by whom?

I'm interested in particularly mangement consulting practices.

Apr 20, 2017

Anyone?

Apr 20, 2017
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