Not sure what I want out of life... Current Junior Analyst

Recently I read a lot of Mark Manson and spoke with a lot of entrepreneurs who seemed really passionate about their callings. A VP actually left the firm to start his own company. Everyone says find your calling and pursue vigorously. But what if I am not sure what the hell I am passionate about? I think I like investing, or at least that's what I told myself throughout college and what I told my interviewers.

Any other juniors feel the same way? Money is supposedly great at the shop ( $15 bil+ megafund) but I'll always be someone else's bitch. I also feel like a large part of the reason I went into this industry and picked this firm was the reputation and because I cared about what other people thought of me.

How and typically when do people find their passions?

Comments (16)

 
Feb 17, 2015 - 11:52am

Even the people who start down an entrepreneurial path end up being someone's bitch one way or another, so if you do decide to start your own company, make sure that you're doing it because of 1.) an unexploited niche in the market, 2.) a passion, or 3.) a possibility to create a better product/service and undercut the market. I feel like a lot of kids tell themselves they like finance, or investing, perhaps enamored by the supposed glamour of Wall Street or the fortunes that 99.9% of those in the industry don't end up making, and then they insert themselves in a career that isn't really for them. As far as finding your passion - the world is your oyster; go out and try new things, go outside of what normally defines your life, and I'm sure you'll find things you're passionate about. Not all passions can be monetized though, so be realistic.. Some passions are best pursued only as hobbies.

 
Feb 17, 2015 - 7:01pm

NickW1:

As far as finding your passion - the world is your oyster; go out and try new things, go outside of what normally defines your life, and I'm sure you'll find things you're passionate about. Not all passions can be monetized though, so be realistic.. Some passions are best pursued only as hobbies.

Great tip.

Winners bring a bigger bag than you do. I have a degree in meritocracy.
 
Feb 17, 2015 - 2:12pm

Dude you're in your early twenties of course you dont know your "life calling" or "passion". Neither do I and its okay. Have fun and literally try hundreds of things. Something will stick. If you're too lazy to think of anything, learn to surf, play an instrument, get good at chess. Just do something instead of moaning about how you don't have a passion.

[quote=mbavsmfin]

I don't wear watches bro. Because it's always MBA BALLER time!

[/quote]
 
Feb 17, 2015 - 5:44pm

Better to not know your passion than know your passion and be trapped in a cube 80 hours a week and never able to pursue it. Once you figure it out. Quit and chase your dream.

Follow the shit your fellow monkeys say @shitWSOsays Life is hard, it's even harder when you're stupid - John Wayne
 
Feb 19, 2015 - 12:56am

To elaborate, you may not know for sure what you are going to do later but you need to lay a good foundation for that future success now....and you do that by learning as much as you can, being a high performer, and not neglecting your personal development and interests.

If you decide to do something else later you will be swimming upstream. That means that you will probably need every advantage you can get. the knowledge, network, and experience you gain now will be invaluable. If you blow your current situation off then you won't have the benefit of things like a strong enough network to find expertise you need without paying out the ass for it, strong recommendations to get into a good MS/MBA/PHD program or another industry, or the assets on hand to finance your ambitions.

 
Feb 19, 2015 - 1:04pm

by all means if you hate finance, definitely stay on to move to buyside and b-school - you'll feel better after your two-year stint even if you hate all aspects of the job because, who are we kidding, the buyside is completely different from sell-side

speed boost blaze
 
Feb 19, 2015 - 9:49pm

I'm on the buyside at a large fund.

Pennies from JcPenny
 
Feb 19, 2015 - 1:56pm

Which gets into what I was saying: to get into a good B-school and enable a strong career switch, he's going to need strong recommendations and a track record of career advancement.

Plus that may come in handy when he needs to find investors for starting a business, or people in other industries that he wants to move to.

 
Feb 19, 2015 - 11:46pm

Be open minded would be a good start, I think.

When you see new things you deem attractive, find some time to explore it.

Fortes fortuna adiuvat.
 
Feb 21, 2015 - 12:33pm

I'm not sure my services in that industry could fetch a living wage.

Pennies from JcPenny
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