Comments (24)

Jan 13, 2012

Texas may be bottom tier when it comes to national education statistics but these candidates nailed it on the head.

Funny how central banking has existed for ~ a century in this country and people think its a norm... to be against it is so radical huh? What about a couple thousand years of history and real money actually backed by something?

"Those who cannot remember the past, are condemned to repeat it"

Jan 14, 2012

It's too bad he gets decimated in the 50+ voting block (aka the welfare recipients and those on state funding). He would destroy every other candidate if the people who "matter" to this country (the young, productive workers) had their fair say. Such is politics....

Jan 14, 2012
blackrainn:

It's too bad he gets decimated in the 50+ voting block (aka the welfare recipients and those on state funding). He would destroy every other candidate if the people who "matter" to this country (the young, productive workers) had their fair say. Such is politics....

Ironically, Paul is the only one that would even preserve the welfare system in this country. Paul has repeatedly said that he wouldn't cut these programs immediately since so many people have become dependent on them, but he would cut waste elsewhere (Overseas militarism, pointless agencies, Obamacare, etc.) to better fund these programs. Obama and Romney are fine with lying to people saying everything is going to be fine and because neither are going to cut spending, interest rates will stay around 0% for the foreseeable future and when the dollar collapses no one will get anything. Sadly, people are fucking idiots, and the fact that the 65+ demo gets their news exclusively the MSM means they are very misinformed.

Jan 14, 2012

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Jan 14, 2012

The central bank isn't the problem. Whatever mistakes the Fed made a decade ago had almost nothing to do with the housing bubble. This is the industry I work in--subprime lending, Congressional housing policy, fraud, poor appraisal practices, and individual greed created this housing bubble. Low interest rates had only a nominal effect on housing prices. By today's standards interest rates were downright high in 2005. Loose credit created the housing bubble, and loose credit was not particularly associated with interest rates.

The Fed isn't to blame for Congress spending money like it's going out of style. I keep hearing that fiat currency is an enabler of Congressional carelessness and that the clear fix is to end the Fed and get on gold. Think about how crazy that is! You're telling me the American people have the political will to transform the entire monetary system of the civilized world but not the political will to demand that Congress balance the budget? You're telling me the American people are willing to sacrifice immense economic pain in the first decade of a monetary policy revolution but don't have the political will to demand simple reforms to the entitlement system? If that's what you're telling me then I've got oceanfront property in Arizona to sell you.

I'm just curious as to what a Fed audit is even meant to accomplish. Fed employees are not elected. Most are bureaucrats and only a handful are even appointed officials. The Fed releases all or most of its private information on a 5-year rolling basis. This audit the Fed and end the Fed movement has begun to become more fad than fact, more fantasy than finite. Even if we uncover the most nefarious items associated with the Fed, what exactly would we do about it? Give greater power to Congress over monetary policy? If you think we have a clusterf*ck of a system now just wait until the Speaker of the House or the Chairman of the House financial services committee is pulling monetary policy strings.

Sure, the Fed could use greater oversight and could stand to operate under the Japenese principle of kaizen--constant improvement--but let's leave the End the Fed movement to 1st year economic majors at our local community colleges.

Jan 14, 2012
Virginia Tech 4ever:

If you think we have a clusterf*ck of a system now just wait until the Speaker of the House or the Chairman of the House financial services committee is pulling monetary policy strings.

First of all, I hope your trolling.

Second of all, you have an issue with an elected official being in charge of the money supply (Which is not what Paul's Fed Bill would do - you should stop listening to Fox News), but not with a secretive independent agency that is accountable to no one, and has a clear cut track record, of helping no one except the banking institutions that own it. Elected official = Bad, Private unaccountable chairman loyal to banks with a history of not having a godamn clue about what is going on = Good. Did you see the minutes they just released, Bernanke and Geithner had absolutely no idea that a crisis was even possible in 2006. They are a joke.

Why we replaced the gold standard with a PHD standard I'll never understand. And to say the Fed had absolutely no role in the housing bubble is laughable at best. In my mind you have no credibility left.

Jan 14, 2012

I'd rather have an unaccountable bureaucrat running monetary policy than an interested (elected) party whose electoral fortunes could be won or lost based on the monetary policy he/she implements. That's the reason we have an independent central bank, so that people like John Boehner and Nancy Pelosi cannot manipulate monetary policy for short-term political gain.

I'd bet you $1 million I have a far better understanding of the housing bubble than you do given that I, umm, am a partner in a lending institution and that I pay rent and buy groceries with my knowledge of the industry. You don't have the slightest clue what happened or how it happend other than some generic academic knowledge of the housing bubble. You have no clue how this industry even works or even the difference between government and GSE loans.

Edit: I didn't say the Fed had "absolutely no role". It played a small role with a dozen other things.

Jan 14, 2012
Virginia Tech 4ever:

I'd rather have an unaccountable bureaucrat running monetary policy than an interested (elected) party whose electoral fortunes could be won or lost based on the monetary policy he/she implements. That's the reason we have an independent central bank, so that people like John Boehner and Nancy Pelosi cannot manipulate monetary policy for short-term political gain.

Solution: Gold standard. No special interests involved.

Jan 14, 2012
JeffSkilling][quote=Virginia Tech 4ever:

Solution: Gold standard. No special interests involved.

Jan 14, 2012

Although I vehemently disagree with the gold standard, even if it were the right course there's < 0% chance there would ever be the political will for it. You first show me the political will for cutting spending by more than $100 billion over 10 years and for raising the retirement age of SS or for making some other basic reforms I'd then I'd raise the odds from -5 to 1 in a million that the American people would have the will for such a move.

Jan 14, 2012
Virginia Tech 4ever:

Although I vehemently disagree with the gold standard, even if it were the right course there's < 0% chance there would ever be the political will for it. You first show me the political will for cutting spending by more than $100 billion over 10 years and for raising the retirement age of SS or for making some other basic reforms I'd then I'd raise the odds from -5 to 1 in a million that the American people would have the will for such a move.

The American public doesn't give a shit about monetary policy, of course there is no will. They don't care what it's backed by, but we have 2 options. Transition back to a sort of Bretton Woods system sooner rather than later, or be forced to after the dollar collapses.

Jan 14, 2012

The dollar will only collapse if Congress doesn't get its spending under control. The collapse of the dollar is not an inevitability. The salvation of the dollar begins this November with the GOP expanding its majority in the House, the GOP taking over the Senate and Romney becoming president. If these 3 things occur and we see no progress on getting our fiscal house in order then I will be with you that the collapse of the dollar is inevitable. That's why it's so important to remove Obama and Reid from positions of power in November. Romney is a moderate, but he's spineless enough to go with the mood of the country and the Tea Party takeover of Congress I'm praying will be the spark that ignites at least the temporary salvation of this nation.

Jan 14, 2012
Virginia Tech 4ever:

The dollar will only collapse if Congress doesn't get its spending under control. The collapse of the dollar is not an inevitability. The salvation of the dollar begins this November with the GOP expanding its majority in the House, the GOP taking over the Senate and Romney becoming president. If these 3 things occur and we see no progress on getting our fiscal house in order then I will be with you that the collapse of the dollar is inevitable. That's why it's so important to remove Obama and Reid from positions of power in November. Romney is a moderate, but he's spineless enough to go with the mood of the country and the Tea Party takeover of Congress I'm praying will be the spark that ignites at least the temporary salvation of this nation.

I wish I could share your optimism about Romney/GOP cutting spending in any material way, but I don't see it. Romney has only talked about cutting proposed increases like that means anything and his spending plan is not impressive. Hopefully the GOP will move back towards their small government roots but I have seen nothing in congress to suggest this is likely.

Jan 14, 2012

Well, I'm expressing greater optimism than I feel. In my mind I'm willing to give it one last go with a GOP Congress and center-right executive. If there is little progress made then I will start moving to the libertarian camp come 2014 and 2016. I do appreciate how the Ron Paul movement has put a spotlight on the horrific spending habits of Congress. It's too bad for the movement that he's not a little younger.

Jan 14, 2012

what exactly is the benefit of the gold standard?
they're just going to re-peg it when the political pressure to do so becomes too strong

Jan 14, 2012
junior2012:

what exactly is the benefit of the gold standard?
they're just going to re-peg it when the political pressure to do so becomes too strong

What's the benefit of a constitution? They're just going to interpret it however they want when the political pressure becomes too strong.

We gotta start somewhere...hard-asset backed paper currency is better because it provides all the benefit of medium of exchange but true storage of wealth (ie look up the function of money).

At least when a hard-asset backed currency is re-pegged, it's obvious to the people that the government is devaluing their savings...

Jan 14, 2012

There are nuances VA Tech is missing. The Fed needs real money, otherwise it can just print and blow-up later when bond vigilantes do here what they've done in Europe. While the gold standard is unpopular (mostly due to propaganda from liberal or ignorant economists), the ideal is a structure of a multi-commodity backed currency, or a system of competing currencies backed by different hard assets. Right now, this system sort of exists, but is left to the domain of the elite, who can buy and store hard assets, or buy futures, to preserve their wealth.

Jan 14, 2012

Btw, people who say deflation is "evil" are the intellectual midgets of the economic profession. These people would have you believe that increased productivity in real terms is a bad thing...

Jan 14, 2012

Again, alex, there is no political will for anything of the sort. The United States is still relatively wealthy and well off---relatively good economy, good universities, good quality of life, relatively inexpensive fuel. Why in the world would the American public subject itself to years of unnecessary pain because a handful of movement people believe there is a "better" form of monetary system? All the ills of our nation can be corrected externally from our monetary system. Outsized budgets, collapsing entitlement systems, cyclical housing bubbles, burgeoning municipal debt, etc. They can all be fixed without radical monetary revolution. Why have a movement aimed at radical and unrealistic reforms when the movement can most realistically accomplish its goals through incremental reforms in the tax code, in spending, in housing policies and in better Fed and government sponsored enterprise oversight?

Jan 14, 2012

I always got the impression that auditing the Fed was meant to reveal something shocking (fairly likely); shocking enough to get the public (if only temporarily) behind massive monetary policy reform.

Jan 14, 2012

Just to clarify something guys: Ron Paul realizes he won't be able to End the Fed, despite his desire to do so. What he intends to do if elected is to create a competing sound-money currency and let the people choose which one they prefer.

You don't need to end the Fed if it eventually just fades away.

Jan 14, 2012

Bottom line is we are never going to pay the debt back (especially if Romney / Obama get elected) and therefore there will either be A) A default (not going to happen) B) inflate away the debt (might happen) or C) A structured resettling (again not going to happen)...... The way I see it we either walk away in 3-4 years or we see some huge inflation numbers. Debt / GDP has already crossed the "critical" 100% zone, and I really don't see any hope for the future. The bond market can be tricky (just look at Italian spreads over the past year, it really doesn't look bad until its bad.) We are in for a very, very rude awakening in the near future.

The problem is the issue that the "national debt" means virtually nothing to almost all Americans. I know it's not particularly salient to me (what does $15,000,000,000,000 vs $13,000,000,000,000 matter to me?). Unless you are in the CBO, you just aren't exposed to the numbers often enough to get worried, and the benefits (buying useless crap now) far outweigh in our minds the much more negative future consequences (increased inflation, etc.) Our minds just aren't built to deal with complex political issues unfortunately (some do get it,but I don't believe the average American is truly able to understand).

The good news though is that we have a bunch of Chinese goods, they have a bunch of dollars in the bank, and we have nearly half a trillion dollars in total gold reserves. Still, we aren't in a good position.

Jan 14, 2012
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Jan 14, 2012