Selfstudy resources

I'm looking for some decent online resources I can use to get a head start on finance coursework. I'm a recent high school grad taking a year off to volunteer in LatAm before attending a target next year, and will have a fair bit of downtime during this. While I of course will take advantage of being an adult in such a free part of the world, I don't want my study habits to fall behind, especially in math. So far I've bookmarked Khan Academy (again) and MIT OCW to run through, and was wondering if anyone else had ideas for online substance or books to read.

Region: 
Mexico + Central America
United States - Northeast

Comments (22)

Jul 29, 2018

Investment Banking Valuation by Rosenbaum and Pearl is a must for understanding Investment Banking. Read Marketwatch, WSJ, and Investopedia every day (just what interests you not everything) and take an Investopedia course. They are free and set up like textbooks. Go to investopedia and look up University or Courses and they are free and cover every topic you can imagine. I bought some used and old CFA Level 1 and 2 prep books and read them. I do not try to study them but just basic understanding

My Brother. My Captain. My King.

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Jul 29, 2018

Awesome, thank you, I had forgotten about Investopedia Academy, I'll definitely use that. The IB Valuation kindle book is only 47.50 so that's great as well. Thanks for your input.

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Jul 29, 2018

Yeah no problem I am non target and a tryhard so I self study a lot. Investopedia academy is really good however I would reccomend getting the hardcover to make notes in it and write in it. Also if you read the reviews for the Kindle version the graphics suck/are not included.

My Brother. My Captain. My King.

Jul 29, 2018

pm me ur email i can send you the IB book for free

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Jul 29, 2018

Hopefully this helps. I do a lot of self study also. I recommend setting up a practice trading account so you can not only practice but look at the market and apply what you read/learn to what you see.

My Brother. My Captain. My King.

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Most Helpful
Jul 29, 2018

If you get in contact with kids that are in the finance clubs at your school, especially a target, they'll probably be able to hook you up with a 'treasure box' type zip folder with more shit than you know what to do with.

I started with the accounting/corporate finance stuff when I first got into this. Forms the foundation for everything else. If you can really understand how the 3 statements work together and use assumptions to make projections, everything else comes easy

Second the Investment Banking book by the joshua's, has been solid to help conceptualize key modeling concepts. Not plugging anything but I've been using the Wall Street Prep financial modeling self-paced online videos and walking through them step-by-step with a different company than the one you use. They use apple who has the best put together financial statements ever...if you start doing it on mid-cap companies you'll see that's not always the case and you'll be able to work out some of the practical aspects that need to be taken into consideration when modeling. I came up with a 3-statement model and DCF for a stock I thought had a good position strategically (The Intelligent Investor criteria), and ended up finding a undervalued equity, bought it, and it's up like 30% now.

Didn't slave over this or anything, just set aside a few hours here and there every week to keep me sharp before school starting back up again.

just a monkey trying to find his way in the finance jungle

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Jul 30, 2018

Network lad, 10x better.

Absolute truths don't exist... celebrated opinions do.

Jul 30, 2018

Have you done Damodaran's?

Jul 30, 2018

The one on Itunes U?

Jul 30, 2018

Of course you should. Not only will it help you do better in your classes during your junior/senior year, it will give you an edge over your peers. You're not naive enough to think a 200k education would teach you anything are you? It's all free here on the internet. You just need the self discipline to sit down and grind through every resource available to you. The sky is the limit as to what you can learn out there (ie: WSO, youtube, wsj, M&I, etc.)

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Jul 30, 2018

how do you think most non-finance/business majors get offers? "self-study" certainly won't make you stand out - it is a requisite if you want to break in to this industry. and if you are a finance major, you better know your stuff - really well - otherwise your gonna get dinged, quickly.

even as a sophomore, i'd start opening those textbooks this year. competition is pretty stiff, and your better off starting now than later on.

good luck.

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Jul 30, 2018

Go to investopedia and read very single tutorial. They are quite helpful and I did it when I was still a frosh.

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Jul 30, 2018

Thanks for the responses guys! I agree that competition is pretty stiff and that it's better to have an edge over everyone else. But hopefully I'll still be able to get that internship. Wish me luck on the self study! haha.

Jul 30, 2018

I'm in your exact same shoes (majors, year etc.) and have not learned any finance in school. The studying that I have done on my own has made me completely stand out from my peers. Many firms aren't expecting you to know anything as a sophomore, but if you know enough to out-perform juniors in interviews then so be it.

Besides what are you going to do instead, sleep?

Jul 30, 2018

^Thanks for telling me that! It's hard to find someone in my year who has self studied and shared successful stories. And by successful I mean being able to differentiate oneself. So thanks! Looks like I'll be studying for an extra subject starting this semester haha.

Jul 30, 2018

I picked this up Investment Banking: Valuation, Leveraged Buyouts, and Mergers & Acquisitions by Josh Rosenbaum the other day and has been great thus far.

Jul 30, 2018

Thanks!

Jul 30, 2018
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