Comments (76)

Nov 24, 2011

Probably the works of Plato and Aristotle. Maybe throw in some Netwon. Honestly, just look for any "great books" list and you'll be set.

Nov 24, 2011

The giving tree.

Seriously.

Follow the shit your fellow monkeys say @shitWSOsays

Life is hard, it's even harder when you're stupid - John Wayne

Nov 24, 2011

The Great Gatsby.

My all time favorite book.

"Have you ever tried to use a chain with 3 weak links? I have, and now I no longer own an arctic wolf."
-Dwight Schrute

Nov 25, 2011
Hamilton:

The Great Gatsby.

My all time favorite book.

Great book hopefully Leo does justice to him.

Nov 24, 2011

Jack Kerouac - on The Road

Nov 24, 2011

The Catcher in the Rye. Best book ever.

Nov 24, 2011

http://amzn.to/jZ62Vx
In all seriousness:
Think and grow rich by Napoleon Hill
Capitalism and Freedom by Milton Friedman
Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand
Trader Vic by Victor Sperandeo (last half of the book is nothing short of stellar)
Against the Gods by Peter Bernstein
Outliers by Malcolm Gladwell

Nov 24, 2011

All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque
If This is a Man by Primo Levi
Swann's Way by Proust
The Bible

Nov 24, 2011

Martin Eden by Jack London

Nov 24, 2011

Goodnight Moon

I eat success for breakfast...with skim milk

Nov 24, 2011

Autumn of the Patriarch
Lucky Bastard
God Is Not Great
Patriot Acts
The Road to Serfdom

I am not cocky, I am confident, and when you tell me I am the best it is a compliment.
-Styles P

Nov 24, 2011

Guns, Germs, and Steel

Nov 24, 2011

100 years of solitude

Nov 24, 2011

I had to include several finance related titles... psychology, philosophy, classics:

The Black Swan
Extreme Money
The Numerati
Why People Believe Weird Things
How We Know What Isn't So
Predictably Irrational
Money Game
The Education of a Speculator
A Demon of Our Own Design
A People's History of the United States
The Misbehavior of Markets
The Crowd
Thus Spoke Zarathustra
The Clash of Civilizations and the Remaking of World Order

*Guns, Germs, and Steel (as posted earlier... amazing book)

Nov 24, 2011

Overall Books
+1 for The Alchemist
A Clockwork Orange
The Catcher in the Rye

Business Books
Boomerang
Hot, Flat and Crowded
Liar's Poker

Nov 24, 2011

The Five People You Meet in Heaven - Mitch Albom
Reminisces of a Stock Operator- Edwin Lefevre
The Razor's Edge - Somerset Maugham

Nov 24, 2011

Anything by Christopher Hitchens or Niall Ferguson.
Yeah. I have a thing for British non-fiction writers.

Nov 24, 2011

Bonfire of the vanities
Crime and Punishment
Catch 22

Nov 24, 2011

2001: A Space Odyssey

/nerdass... sorry, I loved that book. It was assigned for a class and I blew through it.

I also liked City of Glass but I can see why some people wouldn't want to read it.

Freakanomics was good too

If your dreams don't scare you, then they are not big enough.

"There are two types of people in this world: People who say they pee in the shower, and dirty fucking liars."-Louis C.K.

Nov 24, 2011

Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse - my all time favorite, i read it about once a year
+1 for All Quiet on the Western Front
Tortilla Flat - Steinbeck
Into Thin Air - Krakauer

I'll throw Dune and Dune Messiah in there too, bc it changed the way I think about religion. But obviously wouldn't hold up to much literary criticism.

Nov 24, 2011

The ones I have read that you should:

Catcher in the Rye
Great Gatsby
1984
A Brave New World
Fahrenheit 451
Atlas Shrugged
The Sun Also Rises
The Old Man and the Sea
From Beirut to Jerusalem
Liar's Poker
Outliers
Animal Farm
All The King's Men
To Kill a Mockingbird
Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy
Ender's Game
Lord of the Rings

Books I haven't read that I've been told I have to:

As I Lay Dying
Point Counter Point
For Whom the Bell Tolls
Catch-22
Slaughterhouse Five
The Sound and the Fury
The French Lieutenant's Woman
On the Road
A Clockwork Orange
Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance
A Farewell to Arms

Nov 24, 2011

Also have to give an honorable mention to the 4 Hour Body and the 4 Hour Work Week, they aren't great literature, but they show you different ways to think about how you live life (which is really what literature is in the most basic sense).

Nov 25, 2011
D M:

Also have to give an honorable mention to the 4 Hour Body and the 4 Hour Work Week, they aren't great literature, but they show you different ways to think about how you live life (which is really what literature is in the most basic sense).

+1

Nov 24, 2011

The Count of Monte Cristo is by far the best book I've ever read. I read it at least once a year. Get the full version, why our society creates abridged versions of books is beyond me.

Nov 24, 2011
farmerbob:

The Count of Monte Cristo is by far the best book I've ever read. I read it at least once a year. Get the full version, why our society creates abridged versions of books is beyond me.

Shit, don't know how I missed this one. I absolutely agree with CMC being the best book I've ever read. Well, it's a close tie between that and The Catcher in the Rye.

Nov 29, 2011
D M:
farmerbob:

The Count of Monte Cristo is by far the best book I've ever read. I read it at least once a year. Get the full version, why our society creates abridged versions of books is beyond me.

Shit, don't know how I missed this one. I absolutely agree with CMC being the best book I've ever read. Well, it's a close tie between that and The Catcher in the Rye.

I heard its great too.. but having already seen the movie do u think its still worth reading since I know how it ends?

Nov 24, 2011

On the Road.

Nov 24, 2011

Hunger Games

Learn Programming, Lectures by Professor Mehran Sahami for the Stanford Computer Science Department

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KkMDCCdjyW8

Nov 24, 2011

For anybody who even remotely likes watching sports - Those Guys Have All the Fun: Inside the World of ESPN

In the war against you and the other qualified candidates out there, the best arsenal is to prove that you have outdone yourself.

  • rhetoric
  •  Nov 24, 2011

The Prince - Niccolo Machiavelli

Nov 25, 2011
rhetoric:

The Prince - Niccolo Machiavelli

The Prince is the best and philosophically deep... I was able to read it from a friend, but I never own one.

Nov 24, 2011

King of Capital: The Remarkable Rise, Fall, and Rise Again of Steve Schwarzman and Blackstone - David Carey

Post American World - Fareed Zakaria

Private Capital Markets - Robert Slee

Steve Jobs - Walter Isaacson

Nov 25, 2011

The prince of tides - pat conroy

really anything by conroy is fantastic

"Life all comes down to a few moments. This is one of them." - Bud Fox

Nov 25, 2011

Wow, this thread has my name written all over it.

Anything by Leo Tolstoy or Fyodr Dostoyevsky must be read by default. Anna Karenina is truly beastly. Also rounding out the top 10 would be All Quiet On the Western Front, Brave New World, Complete Works of Shakespeare, 1984, Brothers Karamazov, anything by H.P. Lovecraft, complete works of Edgar Allen Poe (especially Arthur Pym of Nantucket), For Whom the Bell Tolls, and The Trial by Franz Kafka. Honorable mention to "Count of Monte Crisco by Alexandree Dumbass." :)

The Alchemist, I'm sorry to say, is a terrible book. This girl I liked begged me to read it, and by the time I was done with it, I didn't like her anymore. No development, no conflict, and the main character just has all these random flashes of inspiration that aren't brought on my anything. "And then he realized X, Y, and Z. And he was happy." But I am thankful for all of the above.

Metal. Music. Life. www.headofmetal.com

Nov 25, 2011
In The Flesh:

Wow, this thread has my name written all over it.

Anything by Leo Tolstoy or Fyodr Dostoyevsky must be read by default. Anna Karenina is truly beastly. Also rounding out the top 10 would be All Quiet On the Western Front, Brave New World, Complete Works of Shakespeare, 1984, Brothers Karamazov, anything by H.P. Lovecraft, complete works of Edgar Allen Poe (especially Arthur Pym of Nantucket), For Whom the Bell Tolls, and The Trial by Franz Kafka. Honorable mention to "Count of Monte Crisco by Alexandree Dumbass." :)

The Alchemist, I'm sorry to say, is a terrible book. This girl I liked begged me to read it, and by the time I was done with it, I didn't like her anymore. No development, no conflict, and the main character just has all these random flashes of inspiration that aren't brought on my anything. "And then he realized X, Y, and Z. And he was happy." But I am thankful for all of the above.

Since you like Dostoyevsky, quick question, did you enjoy Notes From UNderground? I am reading it right now but it just seems like he is rambling on, gets to a point then does a 180 and goes off on a different direction? What are your thoughts on Gogol, Pushkin, Turgenevov (Sketches from a Hunter albums?)

My List:
The Selfish Gene
48 Laws of Power
The Game
My Journal

Nov 25, 2011
TheOneandOnlyRD:
In The Flesh:

Wow, this thread has my name written all over it.

Anything by Leo Tolstoy or Fyodr Dostoyevsky must be read by default. Anna Karenina is truly beastly. Also rounding out the top 10 would be All Quiet On the Western Front, Brave New World, Complete Works of Shakespeare, 1984, Brothers Karamazov, anything by H.P. Lovecraft, complete works of Edgar Allen Poe (especially Arthur Pym of Nantucket), For Whom the Bell Tolls, and The Trial by Franz Kafka. Honorable mention to "Count of Monte Crisco by Alexandree Dumbass." :)

The Alchemist, I'm sorry to say, is a terrible book. This girl I liked begged me to read it, and by the time I was done with it, I didn't like her anymore. No development, no conflict, and the main character just has all these random flashes of inspiration that aren't brought on my anything. "And then he realized X, Y, and Z. And he was happy." But I am thankful for all of the above.

Since you like Dostoyevsky, quick question, did you enjoy Notes From UNderground? I am reading it right now but it just seems like he is rambling on, gets to a point then does a 180 and goes off on a different direction? What are your thoughts on Gogol, Pushkin, Turgenevov (Sketches from a Hunter albums?)

My List:
The Selfish Gene
48 Laws of Power
The Game
My Journal

I read Notes From Underground a couple of years ago. It's a good primer for Fyodr's broader style, and his stories in general are very character/conversation-oriented. It's kind of open-ended and chaotic that way. There isn't a clear 180-degree turn, but treat it as a journey rather than as a destination.

Metal. Music. Life. www.headofmetal.com

Nov 25, 2011

For those of you out of school, where do you find the time for pleasure reading? Right before bed for 30min a night or something?

Nov 25, 2011
Blake Donaghy:

For those of you out of school, where do you find the time for pleasure reading? Right before bed for 30min a night or something?

I used to have a ~45 minute commute on the way to work and back, got a lot of reading done that way.

Best Response
Nov 25, 2011
Blake Donaghy:

For those of you out of school, where do you find the time for pleasure reading? Right before bed for 30min a night or something?

You'd be surprised at how many hours there are in a day once you cut out distractions such as TV or surfing WSO (I'm still working on that one obviously). I usually read in bed before falling asleep or I block off a few hours on Saturday and Sunday. I also bring a personal book with me when traveling for work so I can get some time in on the plane or at my hotel if I'm not busy. I try to read for at least 30 minutes a "session" cause that's otherwise it is just too short. Once you start dedicating time to it you'd be surprised at how fast you can get through books. I just bought a Kindle DX for Black Friday and I'm hoping it will make it easier to read on the road.

    • 2
Nov 25, 2011

A Clockwork Orange
The Fountainhead
Oil by Upton Sinclair (There will be blood is based on this)
Reminiscence of a Stock Operator
Requiem for a Dream
This Side of Paradise
The Partnership (book about GS)

Nov 25, 2011

atlas shrugged is the best book i ever read. Its long but if u can get through it it is well worth it. regardless of if you agree with the political/philosophical message, the book is a great story as well.

Nov 25, 2011

i know ill catch shit for this but the girl with the dragon tattoo series is pretty gripping. The mark of a good book to me is the inability to stop reading even when your dead fucking tired and want to go to bed.

Here's the thing. If you can't spot the sucker in the first half hour at the table, you are the sucker.

Nov 25, 2011

I think we need to separate these books into general literary classics and books related to finance/economics. No good when you mix up these 2 categories.

Nov 26, 2011

Wind up bird chronicle by Murakami

+1 for On The Road

Nov 27, 2011

Autobiography of Malcolm X
Catcher in The Rye
The 48 Laws of Power
Great Expectations
Short Stories of Hemingway

Nov 27, 2011

A Moveable Feast - Hemingway

Nov 27, 2011
sloppyj:

A Moveable Feast - Hemingway

Just finished that recently. Wonderful stuff!

Metal. Music. Life. www.headofmetal.com

Nov 27, 2011

Franz Kafka - The Trial
Adam Smith - The Wealth of Nations
Dostoyevsky - Brothers Karamazov
John Updike - Terrorist
Coetzee - Disgrace
Kant - Critique of Judgement
Hamid - Reluctant Fundamentalist
James Joyce - Ulysses
Hemingway - Men without Women

This is a great thread. Got so much to still catch up on.

Nov 27, 2011

Ayn Rand- The Fountainhead
Erich Maria Remarque- All Quiet on the Western Front
Herman Wouk- The Winds of War and War and Remembrance
John Steinbeck- The Grapes of Wrath
James Michner- Poland
Leon Uris- QB VII, Exodus, Mila 18
Cormac McCarthy- Blood Meridian
Larry McMurtry- Lonesome Dove
Jack London- The Call of the Wild
Frank McCourt- Angela's Ashes
Anne Frank- The Diary of Anne Frank
Richard Adams- Watership Down
Ernest Hemingway- For Whom the Bell Tolls
William Faulkner- As I Lay Dying, The Sound and the Fury
Kurt Vonnegut- Slaughterhouse Five
Upton Sinclair- The Jungle
George Orwell- 1984 and Animal Farm
Ken Kesey- One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest
Harper Lee- To Kil a Mockingbird
Joseph Conrad- Heart of Darkness
Leo Tolstoy- War and Peace
Salman Rushdie- The Satanic Verses
Miguel de Cervantes- Don Quixote
Gabriel Garcia Marquez- One Hundred Years of Solitude
Alex haley- The Autobiography of Malcolm X
Vladimir Nabokov- Lolita
Jules Verne- Journey to the Center of the Earth / 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea
Henry David Thoreau- Walden
Voltaire- Candide
Stephen Crane- The Red badge of Courage
Rudyard Kipling- The Jungle Books, Kim, The White Man's Burden
Homer- The Odyssey, The Illiyad
John Milton- Paradise Lost
Charles Dickens- A Tale of Two Cities
Sophocles- Oedipus Rex
Victor Hugo- The Hunchback of Notre dame, Les Miserables
James Cooper- The Last of the Mohicans
Harriet Beecher Stowe- Uncle Tom's Cabin
Robert Louis Stevenson- Treasure Island
Alexandre Dumas- The Count of Monte Cristo, The Vicomte of Bragelonne
Aldous Huxley- Brave New World
Virgil- The Aeneid
Machiavelli- The Prince
Daniel Defoe- Robinson Crusoe
Dante- The Divine Comedy
H.G. Wells- The Time Machine
Bram Stoker- Dracula
William Golding- Lord of the Flies
George Eliot- Silas Marner
Mary Shelley- Frankenstein
F Scott Fitzgerald- The Great Gatsby
Ralph Ellison- The Invisible Man
J.D. Salinger- The Catcher in the Rye
Richard Wright- Native Son
Joseph Heller- Catch-22
Franz Kafka- the Trial, The Metamorphosis
Joseph Conrad- Nostromo
Nathaniel Hawthorne- The Scarlett Letter
W. Somerset Maugham- Of Human Bondage

I can probably think of more

Reality hits you hard, bro...

Nov 27, 2011

Benito Cereno, Moby Dick, Bartelby the Scrivener Herman Melville
Capitalism the Unknown Ideal Ayn Rand (A great defense of capitalism)

Nov 27, 2011

Not a book, but an essay:
George Orwell - A Hanging; You're lurking this forum, you have spare time. Read it now!

Aldous Huxley - Island
Herman Melville - Moby Dick

I have "Too Big to Fail" but am waiting til I finish some others til I read it.

Nov 28, 2011

Count of Monte Cristo unabridged is probably one of the best novels Ive ever read.

Nov 28, 2011

Road to Serfdom
Free to Choose
Capitalism and Freedom

Nov 28, 2011

Books all cultured people should have read:
Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad and the things inspired by it e.g. Achebe's Things Fall Apart
Gabriel Garcia Marquez: 100 Years of Solitude, Chronicle of a death foretold
TS Eliot's the Wasteland (not really a book, but the most amazing piece of modern literature, save perhaps Ulysses) His four quartets are also amazing. Even if you don't understand him, you can read eliot purely belletristically
Catcher in the Rye
Gulliver's Travels
Ezra Pound's the Cantos
Philip K Dick: Man in the HIgh Castle, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep
James Baldwin's Go Tell it on the MOuntain and Invisible Man
Wuthering Heights (yeah, laugh if you want. Great novel)
Tolstoy's War and Peace, Anna Karenina (better than War and Peace imo)
Sophocles' Oedipus cycle
Goethe's Faust -- a fundamentally modern novel written hundreds of years ago.
Flaubert's letters to Madame Bovary
Charles Baudelaire's poems.
Huck finn, tom sawyer (huck finn's better imo)
Rimbaud's poetry.
Virgil's Aeneid
Emily Dickinson, Walt Whitman, Robert Frost, WCW, Yeats, Keats poetry
Ovid's Metamorphoses
George Orwell's 1984, Animal Farm
Cervantes' Don Quixote
Melville's Bartleby the scrivner (whatever, moby dick)
Homer's Illiad and Odyssey
Virginia woolf (imo the greatest female writer who's ever lived): Mrs. Dalloway, To the Lighthouse, The Waves, Jacob's Room
Chaucer's canterbury tales
Dante's divine comedy
As much dostoevsky as you can
Nabokov- Ada or Ardor, Lolita, Pale Fire (1st or 2nd best writer in past 100+ years imo, rivaled possibly by Joyce)
Proust's remembrance
Becketttt - Endgame,Waiting for Godot
Milton's Paradise Lost
Joyce's Dubliners, Portrait of the artist, ulysses
All Shakespeare, including sonnets
Kafka's Penal colony, metamorphosis, and the trial
Faulker's sound and the fury, as i lay dying
Great Gatsby
All Quiet on the Western Front
The THings They carried
I, Claudius
Em Forster's Howard's end

Can't really say anything about other famous novels as I haven't read a lot of them. Read dickins and hawthorne but im omitting them as I don't really like them much as writers.

More modern/lighter/for fun stuff after you've got a good grounding in the western canon:

Catch-22
Slaughterhouse Five
Thomas Pynchon's Gravity's Rainbow, Mason & Dixon
(The philip k dick stuff I listed above belongs in this fun section)

Really modern stuff:
David Foster Wallace: A supposedly fun thing I'll never do again, Consider the Lobster, Infinite Jest (would not recommend to those who aren't "readers," it's quite heavy).
Has anyone read the Pale King? Been meaning to look into it, as i love DFW

Murakami: Kafka on the shore, A Wild Sheep Chase. Wouldn't recommend 1q84 so far, im the middle of it right now.

Other fun reading:
Godel, Escher, Bach
Elegant Universe,
Fabric of the Cosmos,
Liar's Poker
Moneyball
Barbarians at the gate
random walk down wall street
Ascent of money
Road to Serfdom by FA Hayek

Writers to avoid because I hate them:
Dave Eggers (though McSweeney's is marvelous)
Dan Brown (can't write for shit, he gets enough hate though. At least he knows how to attract a large audience.)

Writers I don't want to but feel like I have to comment on because im on WSO:
Ayn Rand:- I've come around a bit with my utter hate for Ayn Rand. One of the things I hated about her was how smug she was about how logically and intelligently she thought she had the answer to philosophical and political problems, when she didn't introduce a single novel idea to either philosophy or political philosophy. I must admit, though, that for someone with political views as strong as hers, few have written a novel that as many people find entertaining. As someone who's well versed in philosophy and political philosphy as well as literature, however, her terrible style of writing (objectively speaking, it is pretty bad), along with old points and ideas makes Atlas Shrugged painful for me to read thorugh. For those who don't want to go through the nerdiness and time of reading through libertarian arguments, various ethical philosphies, etc, I guess Atlas shrugged may be an important book for the budding libertarian mind.

Nov 28, 2011

Which reminds me, Philosphers everyone should be familiar with (top 10 greatest philosophers imo). I only deal with modern philosophers, as most of what Plato/ARistotle talked about is really taken for granted as philosophical ideas by us nowadays. If you've gone through modern LIFE, you won't feel that much satisfaction becoming rigorously familiar with Plato/Aristotle/pre Socratic philosphers. Those are really only useful for helping you understand later philosophers who responded to them. But you can just read summaries.

  1. Immanuel Kant (Can't really argue this...)
  2. Friedrich Nietzsche (Some would probably place him below 3 and 4 but I think he's way cooler. Beautiful writing style, too, unlike fucking Kant.)
  3. Rene Descartes ("father of modern philosophy..." so yeah. Wrong about mad stuff though, but raising the questions was important)
  4. David Hume (Best Empiricist thinker. Better than Locke, imo. Heavily influenced Kant's ethics, in the sense that Kant reacted against him)
  5. Martin Heidegger (I have a huge boner for Heidegger [im not a nazi] but didn't have the balls to put him above Descartes and Hume. Might go up in the future. Best formulation of existentialism, though he didn't call it that)
  6. Edmund Husserl (No Husserl, No Heidegger. So yeah.)
  7. Karl Marx (Had to include political/social philosophers. Also a great economist. Crushes Rousseau, Hobbes, Rawls, Mill IMO)
  8. John Locke (First real empiricist. Also nice political shit. I really don't care about political stuff but w/e.)
  9. Ludwig von Wittgenstein (Analytic philosophy's best dude. Probably close to top 5 if you ask anyone who's crazy about analytic philosophy, so nuff said. Some of his stuff's too cryptic for me but his influence is undeniable. Though his influence on the logical positivists of the Vienna circle are largely due to misreadings of his Tractatus)
  10. G.W.F.Hegel (Idealism, yeah w/e. I don't like him much but he's hella important. I like him more for the people who disagree with him)
  11. Gottlob Frege (No Frege, no Russel/Wittgenstein, probably).
  12. Bertrand Russell (a G logician not as G as Frege though. Also no Russel, no Wittgenstein)
  13. Arthur Schopenhauer (Cool guy. Heavily influenced Nietzsche and most other German philosophers. Good writer to boot. His stuff on will is the shit)
  14. Baruch de Spinoza (His theories of the mind crushed Descartes)
  15. Soren Kierkegaard (existentialism's pretty cool, man. No Merleau-Ponty on this list though. Didn't want to seem too biased. Also JPS is a cock. so there)
  16. Thomas Hobbes and Jean-Jacques Rousseau (more political guys. Don't care for them. Threw them in a random place because whatever, people say they're important. The Leviathan is a fun read ^^)
  17. John Stuart Mill (W/e utilitaranism. I guess it was inevitable)
    Jeremy Bentham (Though I've never really cared for utilitarianism, it's influence on the way we think is inevitable. When people have to reason out moral choices, a lot instinctively go towards utilitarian explanations, even if logically flawed.
Nov 28, 2011

Ender's game is a great read.

Nov 28, 2011
mk0000:

Ender's game is a great read.

indeed sir

Nov 28, 2011

The Great Gatsby- F. Scott Fitzgerald
The Virgin Suicides- Jeffrey Eugenides (prob my favorite book on par with gatsby)
The Illustrated Man- Ray Bradbury
The Martian Chronicles- Ray Bradbury

Nov 29, 2011

Funny no one has spoken about a Confederacy of dunces, by John Kennedy Toole. It is really one of my favourites.

Nov 29, 2011

The american CMC movie is a joke.

Nov 29, 2011

+1 to Enders Game
Watchmen
Dune series
Foundation series
The Cosmos

"...all truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident."

  • Schopenhauer
Nov 29, 2011

Animal Farm (Orwell), 1984 (Orwell), Brave New World (Huxley) and The Europeans (James)

Nov 29, 2011

The Brothers Karamazov
Crime and Punishment
To Kill A Mockingbird
Black Swan
Atlas Shrugged
The Catcher in the Rye
Invisible Man
Beloved
Tropic of Cancer
Don Quixote

-O.K.

Nov 29, 2011

I'll have to agree to classics like The Great Gatsby and The Count of Monte Cristo- they are both excellent reads.

I would also strongly recommend Eric Larson's Devil in the White City and In the Garden of Beasts. Malcom Gladwell is also great.

Additionally a truly amazing read that is without a doubt the most humorous novel ever written: John Kennedy Toole's A Confederacy of Dunces. You will laugh out loud while reading this book. Also most people have never heard of J.K. Toole because the book was published posthumously after his suicide. You will develop serious street cred among avid readers and literary critics after reading this cult classic.

Nov 30, 2011

Things Fall Apart
No Longer at Ease
Lord of the Flies
Seize the Day
Of Mice of Men
The Prince
The 48 Laws of Power
The Autobiography of Malcolm X
The Bible

Nov 30, 2011

To whoever mentioned All Quiet on the Western Front +1!

I'm a history/World War I/II junkie...

Dec 19, 2011

The Seawolf by Jack London - short 200 page story and one of my favs, seldom peeps read it.
The Art of Seduction by Robert Greene - will prolly get you laid.
The 3 Musketeers by Dumas - a classic, great if you like Count of Monte Cristo.

Dec 19, 2011

THE ARISTOS by John Fowles

Dec 27, 2011

Decided I wanted to read a book after at least a couple years of dormancy, saw the title "Ender's Game" suggested multiple times, burned through it, and finding myself wishing that I could read it for the first time again despite finishing it not even a half hour ago. Incredible book.

Jun 9, 2013

What a great thread. Thanks to everyone who contributed. From my own experience I would add A Brief History of Time by Stephen Hawking. The Selfish Gene (already mentioned) is another book which changed my thinking.
On fiction side, I recommend Musashi by Eiji Yoshikawa.

Jun 16, 2013

Excellent books which I highly recommend to read:

- Boomerang (Michael Lewis)
- The Big Short (Michael Lewis)
- Black Swan (Taleb)
- More Money Than God (Sebastian Malleby)

Books that I haven't read yet but saw good reviews:

- Why Nations fail
- The price of inequality
- anything by Niall Ferguson

Jun 17, 2013

There are far too many to name here, but a few that might be of interest to WSO users are:
1. Anything by Jim Collins
2. Titan: The Life of John D. Rockefeller, Sr. by Ron Chernow
3. Anything about Warren Buffett

"It's very easy to have too many goals and be overwhelmed by them... The trick is to find the one thing you can focus on that represents every other single thing you want in life." -- @"Edmundo Braverman"

Jun 17, 2013
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Jun 18, 2014