What are you guys passionate about?

I am asking because I don't really know what I am passionate about. I was set to go work at an IB this summer but got canceled. When I got on a call with one of my mentors, he told me one of the best options for me was to work on something I'm passionate about this summer. I've been thinking about what he has said for quite some time and haven't really found anything that I'm passionate about.

I am just curious to hear from others what are you guys passionate about? I know I'm not the only one in this boat, so any advice would be appreciated as well.

Comments (40)

May 23, 2020

Cars
Trucks
Motorcycles
DIY/tools
Girls (preferably with freckles)
I also like to travel and learn new skills

Most Helpful
  • Analyst 2 in IB - Ind
May 23, 2020

I'm honestly going through that quarter-life crisis in life where I don't know what to do because I feel I am not passionate about anything. At the same time, I am fascinated by a lot of things whether it is finance, history, politics, science, etc. I was always the kid in school who did well and was interested in every subject but never really had a true passion for any of them.

I went into IB thinking I would find my way and that I would enjoy finance and the complexities of impacting industries through major transactions; however, I ultimately realized that this is just a sales job and that transactions are just happening so bankers can make lots of money (of course, there's more nuance to this but still). I also quickly realized that money is not everything and I don't care to be doing something like PE or HF if there is no value or impact I am making through what I am doing except to make money for myself.

I know there are others like me out there who have pretty much lived their life with this feeling and continued doing something like IB or PE where they get good money and financial stability (assuming they are good enough). I'm not too sure if I want to live my life like that though and am really in a rut about what I should be doing with my life as someone who has completed two years of IB at a BB.

    • 16
May 23, 2020

Prefacing this with the fact that I'm super unqualified to respond to this - but assuming you have savings/financial support, I think exploring/tasting other industries and life experiences in your 20's is something to strongly consider (akin to Gary Vee's mentality). If you are convinced that IB/PE isn't how you want to spend your life and if you have the financial freedom to deviate from "the path," I think that life is too short to reason your way into sticking with something that you know isn't for you.

That being said, understand that leaving this path comes with decently high opportunity cost, which is the relatively rapid career/compensation acceleration that this path lends to. When thinking this through, balance this opportunity cost without attributing a "Sunk-cost" mentality, we are only human and discovering our life's mission isn't necessarily a linear path (although once you get there I'm sure you will see how this part of your life fits in the holistic puzzle of what's to come). Additionally, consider that down the line you may develop a strong proficiency in this industry that could spark your "passion" for this field beyond your current sentiment towards it. Something I think this platform fails to acknowledge is that as humans our interests constantly evolve/change, and it takes time to really discover something that we can surely distinguish as our passion (which is an overused buzzword as is). This is especially true if you are an over-thinker, which I'm sure holds true for many of the intelligent and over-ambitious people that use WSO.

Ultimately, think about this choice as if you were on your death bed. If you stay in this industry to chase a mere paycheck, I agree that is a silly rationale and will lead to regret (Contingent on your current financial security). That being said, be conscious of what you would be giving up if you were to taste other industries/opportunities. In other words, be sure of your decision. Make the choice that would fulfill you and your life's mission rather than the thickness of your wallet.

    • 2
  • Analyst 2 in IB - Ind
May 23, 2020

Well said, but like you said, it's definitely hard to take that risk and explore new things for a while without it affecting how employers perceive me in the future.

May 23, 2020
tightcleric51:

Prefacing this with the fact that I'm super unqualified to respond to this - but assuming you have savings/financial support, I think exploring/tasting other industries and life experiences in your 20's is something to strongly consider (akin to Gary Vee's mentality). If you are convinced that IB/PE isn't how you want to spend your life and if you have the financial freedom to deviate from "the path," I think that life is too short to reason your way into sticking with something that you know isn't for you.

That being said, understand that leaving this path comes with decently high opportunity cost, which is the relatively rapid career/compensation acceleration that this path lends to. When thinking this through, balance this opportunity cost without attributing a "Sunk-cost" mentality, we are only human and discovering our life's mission isn't necessarily a linear path (although once you get there I'm sure you will see how this part of your life fits in the holistic puzzle of what's to come). Additionally, consider that down the line you may develop a strong proficiency in this industry that could spark your "passion" for this field beyond your current sentiment towards it. Something I think this platform fails to acknowledge is that as humans our interests constantly evolve/change, and it takes time to really discover something that we can surely distinguish as our passion (which is an overused buzzword as is). This is especially true if you are an over-thinker, which I'm sure holds true for many of the intelligent and over-ambitious people that use WSO.

Ultimately, think about this choice as if you were on your death bed. If you stay in this industry to chase a mere paycheck, I agree that is a silly rationale and will lead to regret (Contingent on your current financial security). That being said, be conscious of what you would be giving up if you were to taste other industries/opportunities. In other words, be sure of your decision. Make the choice that would fulfill you and your life's mission rather than the thickness of your wallet.

Love this

May 23, 2020

Please do not take life advice from Gary fucking Vee

Array

    • 5
May 23, 2020

H U S T L E

Array

    • 2
May 23, 2020

Why? What's wrong with him?

Funniest
May 23, 2020

iF you're NoT GOInG TO YaRd SaLES anD rIppiNG OfF LITtLe Kids aNd OlD PEOPle You're NOT a ReAl HusTleR

    • 6
May 23, 2020

Education. Not the kind where all kids have to get perfect SAT scores and go to H/Y/P, but the type where kids have access to an education platform that teaches them life skills (hard work, analytical thinking, common sense etc.) and prepares them for the real world. Unfortunately, I think there is a disconnect between what is taught at school/college and what the real world/employers want.

On the topic of education, financial education is big to me. The number of teenagers, and the number of adults that know close to nothing about managing their personal finances is honestly worrying. Schools definitely need to take on the responsibility of educating its pupils on such life skills (see above point).

    • 2
May 23, 2020

What do you do in your spare time? Do you have any hobbies?

May 23, 2020

Spreading comps.
I dreamed about it as a kid, during school classes and while I was spreading something else with OPs progenitress. And soon, my dream will become true - I am truly euphoric :)

Vincet Voluntas - Will shall win

  • Intern in IB-M&A
May 23, 2020

This topic hits home. I'm thinking of doing 2 years of IB and then going to med school. I love helping people and value being able to make a difference in life whether that is teaching someone about the basics of value investing or volunteering at a shelter, so naturally I feel as though being a family doctor would be a perfect fit. I still have to write the MCAT next summer but being a MD is the only career I can see myself doing without worrying about my salary or the prestige of where I work.

    • 1
  • Analyst 2 in IB - Ind
May 23, 2020

Why did you decide to do two years of IB and then go to med school? Have you taken all of the pre-reqs yet?

  • Intern in IB-M&A
May 23, 2020

Yeah I did all of the required courses but I figure that doing IB for 2 years will allow me to save and reduce med school debt. However If I enjoy IB and feel as though I fit in then I'll stay and climb the ladder or try to to switch to PE to follow the path.

May 23, 2020

Going "full circle" in my life and career is a passion of mine and is something you can think about as its uniquely you.

Since moving away from my home state (Hawaii) to work in a bigger city, I always wanted to work on a deal in Hawaii and had a few of those opportunities, including early in my career. I always strive to somehow get back, and give back.

From the IB/PE angle, say you grew up in a coal mining town with a declining industry and population. You see an opportunity to take advantages of regulatory changes, subsidies, new technologies and a strategic acquisition that could change the fortunes of your hometown. Or in a real estate angle, leading a consortium of employers to develop a business park to diversify the economy.

Maybe it's giving back to your undergrad because it led to a transformational growth in you personally.

Anyways, it might not be tied directly to your current job/career but it could one day be, because Money Touches Everything.

Ok, I'll reference Steve Jobs, how he talked about the dots of his past seemed to connect and influence what he was building (ie learning fonts in college and then creating fonts for word processing).

This is for those who don't really have a passion for saving the world or know what that is; you can save a bit of your past and make it better. It turns out, you might be one of the few who see this, and that means a less crowded path to your goals.

Of course wealth gives you the opportunity to enjoy some cool toys and experiences and find new passions (like philanthropy; or something crazy like researching UFOs or finding sunken ships). So be good at what you do and hopefully you have some full circle experiences mixed in with new passions.

For you younger people, I would say find out what you want to do to go full circle earlier. After 10+ years of being that activist you'll earn a lot of credibility (you can attend those Conferences as a newbie; learn; over time, you'll be an expert), so start to get focused early on. You also have to tell yourself you are going to do it. There is a lot of power to the self fulfilling prophecy. Get your mind thinking like this. Money Touches Everything, so finance is a great industry for the optionality.

    • 3
May 23, 2020

making money

May 23, 2020

If you don't know where to start, you could learn basic cooking, coffee-making, and/or cocktail making. These are things that will probably be useful at some point in life

  • Analyst 1 in IB - Ind
May 23, 2020

Making posts on WSO about whether RBC is a BB now

    • 2
May 23, 2020
  • Reaching for Yield
  • Deep Value

"In order to be a really good investor, you need to be a little bit of a philosopher as well."
-Dan Loeb

May 23, 2020

Golf. Very easy to develop a passion for the grind of competing against yourself and having an objective way to track progress. Hustling in school/your career to achieve success is definitley in the same vein as chasing scratch considering you are the only factor at play.

    • 1
May 24, 2020

You beat me to it!

By far one of the best outlets to be constantly challenging yourself. It drives me insane!

Array

  • Prospect in Other
May 24, 2020

women

  • Prospect in Other
May 24, 2020

sorority women*

May 24, 2020

I love lifting weights, a lot. So that leads to me reading papers on training techniques and nutrition excessively.

This quarantine I also kinda sorta picked up gradening, at least on a very small scale. Could probably get into owning a small hobby farm some day. Its very rewarding I have heard. Also gives you a good tan, which ultimately makes my muscles looking more defined, win win I guess.

May 24, 2020

What's your recommendation for a quick guide on physiology and training? We had pretty good one in school of roughly 100 pages. But I can't find it anymore.

Array

May 24, 2020

spending time with friends
video games
finance
flirting
paying my bills on time

May 24, 2020
Comment
  • Analyst 1 in IB-M&A
May 24, 2020