Financial & Valuation Modeling Boot-Camp

Financial modeling is a skill that any investment banking analyst will have to master. Although the majority of investment banks and other financial firms now have formal training programs, many students and prospective finance professionals are choosing enroll in self-study financial modeling training programs to look more competitive to potential employers and position themselves as a valuable asset to the firm from Day 1.

Wall Street Oasis presents 35% off Wall Street Prep's popular 3-day Investment Banking Boot Camps. ***NOTE: When you register with a .edu address the discount will be applied upon checkout ...if you are a student without a .edu address please contact Wall Street Prep directly. Discounts do not apply to seminars run by CFA Societies.***

If you can't attend a boot camp, train yourself with Wall Street Prep's popular Self-Study programs and get 15% off as a visitor from WSO! You won't find that deal anywhere else. If you are not a student, you can still get 15% off the live IB Bootcamps by clicking below.

Sign Up Here - 15% Off Special


2016 Summer Analyst IB Recruiting Timeline Megathread

Mod Note (Andy): Make sure to bookmark this page as this will be the cumulative thread for 2016 SA IBD info and added to the frontpage each week to help collect more info

As banks recruit earlier and earlier, I thought it would be good to have a dedicated thread for recruiting this fall. I know from first hand that some accelerated processes are kicking off so it might be beneficial to start aggregating data. This will help keep track of what's going on and the individual deadlines for online applications.

APPLICATIONS / INTERVIEWS / SUPERDAYS

Goldman Sachs

Morgan Stanley

J.P. Morgan


The WSO Advantage

Every step of your career we have you covered. Our products & services are listed below:

Financial Modeling Training

Templates, M&A, LBO, Valuation, + more. Learn More.

Interview Prep Guides

50,000+ copies sold...for good reason. Learn More.

Resume Help from Actual Professionals

Polish Your CV to Land More Interviews. Learn More.

Find Your Perfect Mentor

Realistic Mock Interviews. Learn More.

Video Library: 100+ Hours

Industry Insight & Specific Guidance. Learn More.

Research 1,000s of Firms Free

Interviews, Compensation + more. Learn More.

WSO Job Board

Exclusive $100k+ Positions. Learn More.

Happy Hours & Free Webinars

Don't Miss Out! WSO in Your City. Learn More.


What would you do if you weren't in finance?

I think we all have those days where we want to pull a Chris McCandless and go be a mountain man. If you weren't in finance, what would you do?

I have a knack for extreme stuff. I think I'd get my free-fall skydiving certification and PADI certification and maybe do that stuff. I went skydiving for the first time this summer and it was a fucking thrill - definitely something I want to do again. Another crazy item on the bucket list is to shark dive without a cage. With that said, I think I'd maybe instruct courses in those areas if I wasn't in finance. Or do some personal training, but I think that'd be a tough living financially.


The Diary of a broken man

'Nah chief, I'm not really feeling it tonight, I'll have a beer but will probably leave early..'

We've all uttered a variation of those doomed words. Fast forward 10 hours and it's 6:00 AM on a Friday morning and I am swaying slightly, cursing my reflection in the bathroom mirror.

Idiot.

Maybe it was your boss that dragged you out for 'one beer' after work, maybe it was a leaving drinks, or perhaps, as I often find in my case, you are just a f***** moron. Either way, you now face the ironically sobering prospect of x number of hours in a well-lit office, staring numbly ahead as the time on your taskbar remains stubbornly still, mocking you for your naivety.

Christ I feel awful.

Stumbling from the shower, I desperately try to find a shirt that bears some semblance of being ironed, whilst keeping up a monotone of encouraging comments inside my head.


WSO Weekly Wrap-Up (8/29-9/4)

In case you missed them, here's some of last week's most popular topics:

Be wary of greener grass; there are always tradeoffs...
Post By @moneymogul

As someone who did two summers in investment banking at the same top bulge bracket and subsequently turned down a full time offer, I want to echo what another poster wrote about being wary of greener grass. It never is. There are always trade-offs. The truth is that few jobs are intellectually stimulating.

My Valuation Class: The Fall 2015 Model Preview

It is almost September and as the academic clock resets for a new year, I get ready to teach a new valuation class. With three hundred registered students, it is about as diverse a class as any I have every taught, with a mix of full-time and part-time MBA students, law and engineering graduate students and a few dozen undergraduates. And with a market meltdown framing discussions, it will be interesting to see how the class plays out. As always, I cannot wait for the class to start and as I have, each semester, for the last few years, I invite you to follow the class, if you are so inclined.

Setting the table

Valuation is an intimidating title for a class, stirring up visions (and nightmares) about spreadsheets, accounting statements and financial theory. This may be the default version of the class and it serves experts in the topic well to preserve this air of mystery and intimidation. I have neither the expertise nor the desire to teach such a class, and I hope that you will not only take my class, no matter what your background and experience, but that you will also learn to enjoy valuation as much as I do. The best way for me to start describing my class is to tell you what it is not about, rather than what it covers. So, here we go:


2015 MBA Application Thread

Alright,

So who's struggling through R1 apps like I am? Trying to find the time between my 70 HR week, my needy GF, and life's general bullshit has been tough but I'm through a few first drafts of essays and have my R1 school schools down to Harvard, Wharton, Columbia, Booth, and Sloan.

Who else is going through the process? Where you at? How's it going? How much do you hate bullshit essay questions like "introduce yourself"? Let's all commiserate here.


What Google's new logo means for the rest of us

With the introduction of Google's new logo, a modern age of design and business synergy has finally ushered its way onto center stage. Since 1999, the tech giant hasn't done much to change its unmistakable four colored serif font; only making trivial changes as recent as last year. In fact, the most recent change they implemented was almost indistinguishable, suggesting that Google designers had finally hit a dead end.


Be wary of greener grass; there are always tradeoffs...

Mod Note (Andy): This comment is from the post Career decisions: walking away from FT M&A and is so good (26 silver bananas and counting) that I had to put it as a standalone post on the frontpage. Enjoy.

As someone who did two summers in investment banking at the same top bulge bracket and subsequently turned down a full time offer, I want to echo what another poster wrote about being wary of greener grass. It never is. There are always tradeoffs.

The truth is that few jobs are intellectually stimulating. Most work is process oriented and will be until sentient AIs come to relieve us of our duties. There are a small number of critical creative jobs at any given moment. There is some truly revolutionary stuff going on at tech companies like Google in the fields of machine learning and life extension, but the vast majority of Google engineers are just bodies being thrown at more trivial matters like search and maintaining legacy code. On the non-critical but intellectually stimulating side, the pay is dog shit. Think PhD postgrads, lab technicians, journalists, writers, artists, etc.

Something you'll learn in due course is that it's very uncommon to make this kind of money anywhere outside of high finance without being an entrepreneur or principal. This is about as sure fire a path as one can find to a wealthy existence in the long run without any actual talent and large doses of good fortune.


Energy After Meals

Anyone have any good tips for maintaining a high energy level when returning to the desk right after lunch or dinner?

It seems that unless I eat a salad it takes me c. 1 hour to get my energy back. I usually have a coffee right after lunch too and that doesn't do the trick. Generally not eating unhealthy either - think chop't wrap, roast kitchen, fresh & co, etc


How do you allocate your bonus?

I'll be receiving my first bonus at the end of the year. Just wondering how people who have been receiving massive bonuses for years allocate theirs?

I figured I would put about 50% into IRA/401k accounts, 25% in my personal portfolio, 15% on a big gift (maybe), and the remaining 10% just in my checking account. Certainly open to better ideas from more experienced people.


Advice From a Seasoned Equity Analyst

Mod Note (Andy): #TBT Throwback Thursday - this was originally posted on 8/9/13.

So, I used this website years ago when I was getting into equity research. 7 years on and now considering the buyside, I thought it would helpful to share my experience and advice as this website at the time was very useful in the early years of my career. Please don't ask me for a job as I am not hiring at the moment but if you want advice I am happy to give it to you.

First, a little about me. I have spent 8 years working as an equity analyst in London, NYC and Paris. I have worked at large bulge bracket banks and boutiques. Currently I am one of the top ranked analysts in my sector at a very reputable house in London. You can believe me or not but I can assure you my advice and background is legitimate.

Anyway, let's begin.

1. Skill set

To be a good analyst you need the following skills