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Hey guys,

I discovered this forum a few days ago and have been browsing it since. It appears that most users are from a purely finance/economics background, but I hope I can still get valuable opinions on this.

I am a junior Computer Science major & business minor, but would really love to work on Wall Street eventually. Things like building trading systems and financial modeling sound really interesting. Full time positions related to these things - like quantitative development - require years of experience and a phd, though.

I currently have an internship for this summer with a large mutual fund as a developer for mobile applications. After I graduate, though, I would like to pursue a position that will lead me more on the path of wall street. An internship in a financial institution is a start, but will not really help much in my opinion since I will still be blind of the business half of the company. It seems like there is nothing that I can pursue that will help me! Bloomberg seems to be the only company hiring entry-level positions for what I want, but most of these employees come straight from Bloomberg's equivalent internship program which I just discovered.

How can I gain relevant experience? Is there anything I can do on my own to gain experience that will help me get into Wall Street as a CS major? Should I just continue doing purely technical work in financial institutions until I can get a Masters/PHD

Comments (6)

  • canyonman's picture

    Your on the right track. but a more relevant forum for you would be quantnet. try to get into an MFE program, banks/funds recruit from there. Make sure you brush up on calc also. i think your in good shape!

  • socola2003's picture

    careful with the MFE you get pigeon holed very quickly. With a comp sci degree financial modeling is really easy, trust me I'm a comp sci major and my models blow away any of my other associates'. Take finance/econ classes and learn the basics of finance and accounting so u can get through that technical part of the interview. Brush up on some modeling skills through training courses here or TTS so you can talk somehwat intelligently about them. Your best bet to get into wall st inv banking/inv mgmt is through MBA not MFE.

  • In reply to socola2003
    wadtk's picture

    socola2003 wrote:
    careful with the MFE you get pigeon holed very quickly. With a comp sci degree financial modeling is really easy, trust me I'm a comp sci major and my models blow away any of my other associates'. Take finance/econ classes and learn the basics of finance and accounting so u can get through that technical part of the interview. Brush up on some modeling skills through training courses here or TTS so you can talk somehwat intelligently about them. Your best bet to get into wall st inv banking/inv mgmt is through MBA not MFE.

    I disagree. With the right MFE you'll be able to perform well in a wide variety of roles. People from my MFE now work in IBD, quant developmet, trading, quant analytics, quant modeling, PM etc etc. With a top MFE you have real skills with real value.

  • In reply to wadtk
    canyonman's picture

    wadtk wrote:
    socola2003 wrote:
    careful with the MFE you get pigeon holed very quickly. With a comp sci degree financial modeling is really easy, trust me I'm a comp sci major and my models blow away any of my other associates'. Take finance/econ classes and learn the basics of finance and accounting so u can get through that technical part of the interview. Brush up on some modeling skills through training courses here or TTS so you can talk somehwat intelligently about them. Your best bet to get into wall st inv banking/inv mgmt is through MBA not MFE.

    I disagree. With the right MFE you'll be able to perform well in a wide variety of roles. People from my MFE now work in IBD, quant developmet, trading, quant analytics, quant modeling, PM etc etc. With a top MFE you have real skills with real value.

    This.

    Socola i have no idea what you are talking about. Comp sci, is so far ahead of the curve, and you want him putting excel spreadsheets together. That makes no sense, MFE is the obvious solution here.

  • socola2003's picture

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