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I am a 2nd year MBA student and was dinged in recruiting at final rounds for a full-time position at my top choice firm, but believe I left good impressions over all (interviewers responded to my thank you emails, connected with a few on Linked in after, etc.). Now the recruiting cycle for interns for summer 2013 is starting up, I was wondering if anyone had any feedback on whether seeing if they would take me as a summer intern would make sense. I was thinking:

1) I have shown I can do the job by getting that far, so I have already been screened
2) I showed I was a cultural fit
3) Taking on an intern is low/no risk compared to FT hiring

On the down side:

1) Would sending interviewers/recruiters a letter with the proposal come off as bold or desperate?
2) I know I left things on a good note, would doing this now sour things (and even if it does does that even matter?)

Feedback from you guys would be really helpful!

Comments (9)

  • VoidTrading's picture

    Here is the only issue with being an intern:

    1) Why you over a 1st year MBA with essentially the same skillset and a possible transition into a FT offer post internship.

    I mean, don't get me wrong, but even if it is your top choice firm you can not get hung up on it. Finishing your second year up you should be looking to line up a FT position not looking to intern. FT experience > intern experience.

    If you have good connections and feel it is a fit then keep in touch and try again once you have some FT experience.

    TL;DR: Get a FT and network way back in.

    Just my 2 cents though..

  • In reply to VoidTrading
    BikerGuy's picture

    VoidTrading wrote:
    Here is the only issue with being an intern:

    1) Why you over a 1st year MBA with essentially the same skillset and a possible transition into a FT offer post internship.

    I mean, don't get me wrong, but even if it is your top choice firm you can not get hung up on it. Finishing your second year up you should be looking to line up a FT position not looking to intern. FT experience > intern experience.

    If you have good connections and feel it is a fit then keep in touch and try again once you have some FT experience.

    TL;DR: Get a FT and network way back in.

    Just my 2 cents though..

    Valid points, but let me add some more context. I am waiting to hear back on FT offers in the meantime. Assuming I get one, I can intern in the summer, start FT in the fall with the previous offer and if my top choice firm gave me an offer post-internship I could start during one of their start periods (i.e. Fall 2013, Spring 2014 or Fall 2014).

  • VoidTrading's picture

    That seems like a doable option. But it is high risk, high reward. Here is one issue:

    1) Once again, most internship recruiting targets first year MBA's, so they would'nt want you taking up space in their class. So you may have to do things to go above and beyond to show you are willing to work for them (e/g: work for free)

    I mean, if you want to go for it, go for it. I agree taking on an intern is low risk mainly because they are assessing who they wish to extend offers to for the next fall.

  • timlambcurry's picture

    I don't view this as particularly high risk; he theoretically does the internship and either gets an offer or goes to his full time position elsewhere. The issue is that I don't think it'll work. They had a chance to take you (possibly even two chances if you tried interviewing with them for a summer spot already). You have virtually no extra pieces to add to convince them differently. For better or worse, FT recruiting is the end. You're in the bargaining stages of grief.

    Consulting firms will sometimes work outside of their normal process, but they only do that for those they view as particularly valuable. If they thought you were particularly valuable, they would have extended an offer. That doesn't mean they didn't like you. That doesn't even mean that you weren't right on the edge of making it. But unless you have a particular person who's willing to go all out for you within the firm and who has some pull, there's just very little chance. Having a few polite emails about how you're a smart guy and they know you'll do well professionally will not cut it. You won't even get an interview. You would need a personal champion.

    All this may change if you're talking about a small boutique or something. But if you got oh-so-close with Bain or Deloitte or something...

  • In reply to timlambcurry
    BikerGuy's picture

    timlambcurry wrote:
    I don't view this as particularly high risk; he theoretically does the internship and either gets an offer or goes to his full time position elsewhere. The issue is that I don't think it'll work. They had a chance to take you (possibly even two chances if you tried interviewing with them for a summer spot already). You have virtually no extra pieces to add to convince them differently. For better or worse, FT recruiting is the end. You're in the bargaining stages of grief.

    Consulting firms will sometimes work outside of their normal process, but they only do that for those they view as particularly valuable. If they thought you were particularly valuable, they would have extended an offer. That doesn't mean they didn't like you. That doesn't even mean that you weren't right on the edge of making it. But unless you have a particular person who's willing to go all out for you within the firm and who has some pull, there's just very little chance. Having a few polite emails about how you're a smart guy and they know you'll do well professionally will not cut it. You won't even get an interview. You would need a personal champion.

    All this may change if you're talking about a small boutique or something. But if you got oh-so-close with Bain or Deloitte or something...

    timlambcurry, I am not disinclined to agree with you (how is that for a double negative?). But at this point I am wondering if there is anything to lose (besides my time). I will say I think I came up with a pretty good observation: their yield rate from intern to FT is not meeting their hiring needs.

    While I did not apply for their summer program, I know that many did and interned with them. Despite the fact that they made offers, they had such a need for MBA hires they recruited at both core school and left the door open for non-target applicants to network their way in. Whether they will buy that argument I am not sure, but given that it makes sense I think I have a case (no pun intended) to make. If they will accept the logic of the business case I lay out (they are all linear thinkers with nothing but logic to guide their business decisions!), I have a shot. If it is like appealing a ticket at traffic court and the response to a carefully prepared litany of exhibits and facts is "So what?" then I continue as is and that's that. Thoughts?

  • ladubs111's picture

    You are mistaken when you say interns are lower risk than FT. Intern is actually higher risk for the firms, because they are wasting money on you to train you, and then have no guaranty you'll come back and sign on.

  • timlambcurry's picture

    I don't think you have a lot to lose except to the extent that you have less time, energy and enthusiasm for new opportunities that are far more likely to lead to employment and career success. If you have someone you're particularly close with at the firm, you might start off by contact them and floating the idea. Because someone is going to need to step in during the process and tell the recruiters to give you a chance. Otherwise they're just going to bin your resume. But I'd just be aware that what you're suggesting is a long shot.

  • In reply to ladubs111
    baykus's picture

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