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Fellow Monkeys,

I have been reading WSO since my sophomore year in college but have just recently decided to start posting advice. My #1 reason for the late entry:

A majority of users here are college students who offer bro-science and I wanted to make sure I had relevant experience to back-up my suggestions.

Quick background on me:
Non-target state school, started at Big 4 Audit right after college, stayed there for 2 years, obtained CPA license and was able to parlay my skills into an analyst position on the buy side.

How I got to where I am:
Perseverance and luck - I've always wanted to end up on the buy-side and after failing to land any IBD offers after college, I realized the "traditional" path for me to get to the buy-side would have to be: Audit --> TAS --> IBD/MBA --> PE/VC/HF.

As such, I worked my ass off for the first 2 years in audit, obtained top rankings in my class and began the transition to TAS after receiving the senior title. I was working with a headhunter looking for TAS opportunities and the headhunter was nice enough to throw my name into the pile of resumes for one of their HF clients; I landed a phone interview, and the rest is history. I rejected a TAS offer to work on the buy-side and haven't looked back since.

Reason for my post:
I've been seeing a lot of accounting posts on here, much more so than when I first started reading WSO, and have decided to offer my experience to help any prospective accounting students who want to land into finance. Please leave questions below and I will respond accordingly.

I feel like I can shed much insight into the audit process, the TAS process, and much more, but would rather answer direct questions than post a 10,000 word post about my experience.

Quick note, if you PM me, expect a delay in my response; I will respond to replies on the board much quicker than PM's as I want my knowledge to be publicly available.

8

Comments (136)

  • In reply to itsinthebag
    Mps721's picture

    itsinthebag wrote:
    Mps721 wrote:
    From experience if I am an engineering major eventually could I make the transition into finance if I do not like engineering but have a degree in it? Thank you.

    Definitely. In this current environment, engineer undergrads (granted you have a great GPA), are much more valued than an econ undergrad. You just need to nail down the "why finance and not engineering" portion of the interview and you will be golden.

    Which would you say is more difficult to find a job in Engineering or Accounting(no CPA)?

    Mps721

  • In reply to itsinthebag
    MistaBooks's picture

    itsinthebag wrote:
    calikid3820 wrote:
    Did the headhunters/potential employers see value in your CPA? I know there are countless threads on whether there is value and what the buy-side thinks of the CPA.

    EDIT: I think it's awesome that you made buy-side out of Big 4 Audit. Everyone is constantly saying "it can't be done"

    It's more of an indicator of one's competence, determination and will-power to succeed. If you don't have the CPA, they'll ask you why not and there's no good response to that other than the fact that you're lazy or dumb. Heavy work-load is not a valid excuse and will immediately been interpreted as you are lazy. Slight caveat: If you have less than 1 year of work experience, you will be okay. Anything over 1 year and you'll have some serious explaining to do.

    This couldn't be more true. I didn't learn / retain a damn thing from the CPA exam and I imagine most don't. I would have loved to skip it and told my employer to go ahead and keep that super generous $5k bonus - but like inthebag said - you will immediately be labeled as lazy. L-A-Z-Y, lazy.

    You'll notice in the big 4, all the people that are 'stuck in the middle' - 3-10 years in public accounting who aren't really going anywhere in life, but will cling on to the Big 4 for as long as possible - have taken the CPA exam multiple multiple times and that just goes to show their lack of motivation / laziness.

    If you start your career in public accounting (audit / tax) and you expect to break-out, you have to have the CPA exam.

  • In reply to thedude12r43w
    itsinthebag's picture

    n1cktm wrote:
    Congrats! You recently replied to one of my posts but was hoping to have a more detailed answer. For someone that is coming out undergrad and is looking at getting into other non-banking finance jobs such as corporate banking, valuation shops, etc. or working my way up in corporate finance as an entry level hire (non-rotational) would going the Big4 route have any opportunities. As a note, I am not interested in doing accounting and enjoy finance but don't actually mind putting a few years into big 4 audit if it will give better opportunities down the road.

    In short for a financial services (non-banking career), finance positions in F500s, top16 MBA, would you suggest Big4 audit or entry level financial analyst program in a F500.

    People try to jump from audit to finance. Some succeed, many fail. No one ever jumps from finance to audit. Why would you put yourself in a position to possibly fail when you already have an entry into finance? I'm still sticking with my original decision that I posted in your thread and the general consensus from all other posters seem to agree.

  • In reply to MistaBooks
    calikid3820's picture

    MistaBooks wrote:
    itsinthebag wrote:
    calikid3820 wrote:
    Did the headhunters/potential employers see value in your CPA? I know there are countless threads on whether there is value and what the buy-side thinks of the CPA.

    EDIT: I think it's awesome that you made buy-side out of Big 4 Audit. Everyone is constantly saying "it can't be done"

    It's more of an indicator of one's competence, determination and will-power to succeed. If you don't have the CPA, they'll ask you why not and there's no good response to that other than the fact that you're lazy or dumb. Heavy work-load is not a valid excuse and will immediately been interpreted as you are lazy. Slight caveat: If you have less than 1 year of work experience, you will be okay. Anything over 1 year and you'll have some serious explaining to do.

    This couldn't be more true. I didn't learn / retain a damn thing from the CPA exam and I imagine most don't. I would have loved to skip it and told my employer to go ahead and keep that super generous $5k bonus - but like inthebag said - you will immediately be labeled as lazy. L-A-Z-Y, lazy.

    You'll notice in the big 4, all the people that are 'stuck in the middle' - 3-10 years in public accounting who aren't really going anywhere in life, but will cling on to the Big 4 for as long as possible - have taken the CPA exam multiple multiple times and that just goes to show their lack of motivation / laziness.

    If you start your career in public accounting (audit / tax) and you expect to break-out, you have to have the CPA exam.

    I actually work in Public Finance right now as an analyst and am half way through the CPA.. I passed FAR and BEC. I plan on finishing in the spring and starting a MSF program in May. Maybe it will be a waste :(

  • In reply to AsianMonky
    itsinthebag's picture

    AsianMonky wrote:
    Have you personally seen people with just 5 years of experience in Big 4 Audit go directly into Manager level positions at a F500?

    No. Not for C-level, not for Director level, not for VP level, not even for accounting manager level. They will hire a senior manager (7-8+ years) to be an accounting manager instead of a newly promoted manager simply because the sr. manager has more experience. Yes, I have seen sr. managers leave for director of financial reporting roles at F500, but nothing finance related which is what I believe your desired end-goal is.

    However, at a start-up, yes, I have seen a manager (5 years) transition to accounting manager at the start-up and earn a decent size of earnings after their recent IPO.

  • In reply to Mps721
    itsinthebag's picture

    Mps721 wrote:
    itsinthebag wrote:
    Mps721 wrote:
    From experience if I am an engineering major eventually could I make the transition into finance if I do not like engineering but have a degree in it? Thank you.

    Definitely. In this current environment, engineer undergrads (granted you have a great GPA), are much more valued than an econ undergrad. You just need to nail down the "why finance and not engineering" portion of the interview and you will be golden.

    Which would you say is more difficult to find a job in Engineering or Accounting(no CPA)?

    Engineering. Anyone can file invoices.

  • In reply to MistaBooks
    itsinthebag's picture

    MistaBooks wrote:
    itsinthebag wrote:
    calikid3820 wrote:
    Did the headhunters/potential employers see value in your CPA? I know there are countless threads on whether there is value and what the buy-side thinks of the CPA.

    EDIT: I think it's awesome that you made buy-side out of Big 4 Audit. Everyone is constantly saying "it can't be done"

    It's more of an indicator of one's competence, determination and will-power to succeed. If you don't have the CPA, they'll ask you why not and there's no good response to that other than the fact that you're lazy or dumb. Heavy work-load is not a valid excuse and will immediately been interpreted as you are lazy. Slight caveat: If you have less than 1 year of work experience, you will be okay. Anything over 1 year and you'll have some serious explaining to do.

    This couldn't be more true. I didn't learn / retain a damn thing from the CPA exam and I imagine most don't. I would have loved to skip it and told my employer to go ahead and keep that super generous $5k bonus - but like inthebag said - you will immediately be labeled as lazy. L-A-Z-Y, lazy.

    You'll notice in the big 4, all the people that are 'stuck in the middle' - 3-10 years in public accounting who aren't really going anywhere in life, but will cling on to the Big 4 for as long as possible - have taken the CPA exam multiple multiple times and that just goes to show their lack of motivation / laziness.

    If you start your career in public accounting (audit / tax) and you expect to break-out, you have to have the CPA exam.

    100% correct, and you have to break out before you get "stuck in the middle" otherwise your chances become exponentially harder.

  • In reply to calikid3820
    itsinthebag's picture

    calikid3820 wrote:
    MistaBooks wrote:
    itsinthebag wrote:
    calikid3820 wrote:
    Did the headhunters/potential employers see value in your CPA? I know there are countless threads on whether there is value and what the buy-side thinks of the CPA.

    EDIT: I think it's awesome that you made buy-side out of Big 4 Audit. Everyone is constantly saying "it can't be done"

    It's more of an indicator of one's competence, determination and will-power to succeed. If you don't have the CPA, they'll ask you why not and there's no good response to that other than the fact that you're lazy or dumb. Heavy work-load is not a valid excuse and will immediately been interpreted as you are lazy. Slight caveat: If you have less than 1 year of work experience, you will be okay. Anything over 1 year and you'll have some serious explaining to do.

    This couldn't be more true. I didn't learn / retain a damn thing from the CPA exam and I imagine most don't. I would have loved to skip it and told my employer to go ahead and keep that super generous $5k bonus - but like inthebag said - you will immediately be labeled as lazy. L-A-Z-Y, lazy.

    You'll notice in the big 4, all the people that are 'stuck in the middle' - 3-10 years in public accounting who aren't really going anywhere in life, but will cling on to the Big 4 for as long as possible - have taken the CPA exam multiple multiple times and that just goes to show their lack of motivation / laziness.

    If you start your career in public accounting (audit / tax) and you expect to break-out, you have to have the CPA exam.

    I actually work in Public Finance right now as an analyst and am half way through the CPA.. I passed FAR and BEC. I plan on finishing in the spring and starting a MSF program in May. Maybe it will be a waste :(

    CPA is only necessary to sign off on audit reports/tax filings. If you plan on doing an MSF, the CPA will be zero value to you. Not sure what brought you down the CPA route, unless your job requires it?

  • In reply to itsinthebag
    calikid3820's picture

    itsinthebag wrote:
    calikid3820 wrote:
    MistaBooks wrote:
    itsinthebag wrote:
    calikid3820 wrote:
    Did the headhunters/potential employers see value in your CPA? I know there are countless threads on whether there is value and what the buy-side thinks of the CPA.

    EDIT: I think it's awesome that you made buy-side out of Big 4 Audit. Everyone is constantly saying "it can't be done"

    It's more of an indicator of one's competence, determination and will-power to succeed. If you don't have the CPA, they'll ask you why not and there's no good response to that other than the fact that you're lazy or dumb. Heavy work-load is not a valid excuse and will immediately been interpreted as you are lazy. Slight caveat: If you have less than 1 year of work experience, you will be okay. Anything over 1 year and you'll have some serious explaining to do.

    This couldn't be more true. I didn't learn / retain a damn thing from the CPA exam and I imagine most don't. I would have loved to skip it and told my employer to go ahead and keep that super generous $5k bonus - but like inthebag said - you will immediately be labeled as lazy. L-A-Z-Y, lazy.

    You'll notice in the big 4, all the people that are 'stuck in the middle' - 3-10 years in public accounting who aren't really going anywhere in life, but will cling on to the Big 4 for as long as possible - have taken the CPA exam multiple multiple times and that just goes to show their lack of motivation / laziness.

    If you start your career in public accounting (audit / tax) and you expect to break-out, you have to have the CPA exam.

    I actually work in Public Finance right now as an analyst and am half way through the CPA.. I passed FAR and BEC. I plan on finishing in the spring and starting a MSF program in May. Maybe it will be a waste :(

    CPA is only necessary to sign off on audit reports/tax filings. If you plan on doing an MSF, the CPA will be zero value to you. Not sure what brought you down the CPA route, unless your job requires it?

    It is just something to have as a back up. I also see more value in it over the CFA. I see it as something that will A) add some credibility to my abilities as i went to a very very very small non-target school and did not perform well (insane schedule and also just didn't put forth the effort in school).

    I was a triple major and graduated with 150 so i just figured that since the CFA is only really relevant in the realm of AM the CPA would give me more options if I end up falling back on accounting/auditing.

    I hope to pass the CPA, get a MSF and see what offers I have in what industries and job roles. Ideally I could end up in a state like Mass. where they have the "non-reporting" license. Though part of me really wants to just work in audit for a year to finish the certification.

    EDIT: My career goal ultimately is Growth Equity, and while the CPA won't help me like a MBA will (not saying I won't end up getting one), but I don't see it hurting me either

  • In reply to calikid3820
    itsinthebag's picture

    calikid3820 wrote:

    It is just something to have as a back up. I also see more value in it over the CFA. I see it as something that will A) add some credibility to my abilities as i went to a very very very small non-target school and did not perform well (insane schedule and also just didn't put forth the effort in school).

    I was a triple major and graduated with 150 so i just figured that since the CFA is only really relevant in the realm of AM the CPA would give me more options if I end up falling back on accounting/auditing.

    I hope to pass the CPA, get a MSF and see what offers I have in what industries and job roles. Ideally I could end up in a state like Mass. where they have the "non-reporting" license. Though part of me really wants to just work in audit for a year to finish the certification.

    EDIT: My career goal ultimately is Growth Equity, and while the CPA won't help me like a MBA will (not saying I won't end up getting one), but I don't see it hurting me either

    Sounds like a good plan. You're right in that the CPA won't hurt you. Best of luck!

  • In reply to itsinthebag
    calikid3820's picture

    itsinthebag wrote:
    calikid3820 wrote:

    It is just something to have as a back up. I also see more value in it over the CFA. I see it as something that will A) add some credibility to my abilities as i went to a very very very small non-target school and did not perform well (insane schedule and also just didn't put forth the effort in school).

    I was a triple major and graduated with 150 so i just figured that since the CFA is only really relevant in the realm of AM the CPA would give me more options if I end up falling back on accounting/auditing.

    I hope to pass the CPA, get a MSF and see what offers I have in what industries and job roles. Ideally I could end up in a state like Mass. where they have the "non-reporting" license. Though part of me really wants to just work in audit for a year to finish the certification.

    EDIT: My career goal ultimately is Growth Equity, and while the CPA won't help me like a MBA will (not saying I won't end up getting one), but I don't see it hurting me either

    Sounds like a good plan. You're right in that the CPA won't hurt you. Best of luck!

    I know you were in audit but were looking at Transaction advisory initially as a platform into a MBA and the Buy-side (PE/HF)

    Why did you choose TAS over the Corporate Finance divisions of the Big 4? Does TAS place better into PE/HF/VC in terms of exit opps?

  • In reply to calikid3820
    itsinthebag's picture

    calikid3820 wrote:

    I know you were in audit but were looking at Transaction advisory initially as a platform into a MBA and the Buy-side (PE/HF)

    Why did you choose TAS over the corporate finance divisions of the Big 4? Does TAS place better into PE/HF/VC in terms of exit opps?

    (1) I couldn't find any contacts/information on our corporate finance division and I'm located in a major market. I scoured every floor of my office to no avail and the internal transfer job board never had any openings. I also attended an internal firm-wide event where supposedly all our departments were represented - found consulting, TAS, valuation, but couldn't find Corp. Finance. Chances are its a ridiculously small division and they only hire senior-level people.
    (2) I knew former coworkers who internally transferred to the TAS arm so it was easy to connect directly with them and
    (3) I knew it was realistically possible for me to make the leap to TAS as it is a common exit route for auditors

  • Higheck123's picture

    Could you maybe give a good idea of how the industry/client group you audit at the big four affects things such as hours worked, stress, travel and the like? I am considering an audit position for the summer and am unsure of what each different group brings to the table. Thanks for the great posts btw.

  • In reply to Higheck123
    itsinthebag's picture

    Higheck123 wrote:
    Could you maybe give a good idea of how the industry/client group you audit at the big four affects things such as hours worked, stress, travel and the like? I am considering an audit position for the summer and am unsure of what each different group brings to the table. Thanks for the great posts btw.

    They're all pretty much comparable - it mostly comes down to how picky your senior/manager/partner are as that directly influences the amount of documentation (read: hours worked) required. In general, public companies will be longer engagements due to the additional compliance requirements (SOX testing, hard deadlines). However, you could get a private company with an incompetent accounting stuff that results in a bunch of accounting errors and the time it takes to test and document away those errors could easily be more than the time spent doing SOX testing.

    As an intern, at the major markets at least, they'll most likely put you on public engagements as those engagements need the most resources. You may get to choose, but probably not. However, they will rotate you from engagement to engagement so you should be able to experience a broad range of industries based on what your office offers.

  • GrandJury's picture

    Thanks for answering so many questions, I feel that they have tremendously benefited a lot of posters here. I have a few questions of my own also.

    1) As an undergrad, did you do any relevant internships in either accounting/finance?

    2) Were the headhunters you connected with through Linkedin eager to help you or did you have to work your way into their interest?

    3) Could you explain a little bit more in detail how you handled the technical questions in the interview thought process wise?

    Thanks for your time.

  • MitchKumstein's picture

    As someone who went Big4 Audit -> TS -> IB, I just want to confirm that everything itsinthebag has said is absolutely accurate.

    Many people in audit don't realize that if you perform well, stay intellectually curious, and get out early enough, your exit opps can be quite broad. These exit opps narrow out the longer you stay.

    Night putter.

  • Ruskii's picture

    1.) For those entering Audit(Financial Services) how quickly would you advise them to start looking for finance related opportunities?

    0-1 years before qualifying for the CPA
    1-2 years after qualifying for CPA but before making Senior
    2 years after making Senior

    2.) Or do you believe that staying adds no value and you should begin the process right away

    Also you mentioned that you chose not to pursue the CFA, do you believe that having a level or two out of the way would help you with recruiters/networking/interviews?

    Thank you, I registered here just to ask!

  • Juniper's picture

    If you could have started directly in TAS instead of auditing would you have. I am trying to decide between Big 4 Audit position or due diligence assoicate with Duff & Phelps. I ultimately would like to gear my career towards finance and PE if possible.

    -Thanks

  • Juniper's picture

    If you could have started directly in TAS instead of auditing would you have. I am trying to decide between Big 4 Audit position or due diligence assoicate with Duff & Phelps. I ultimately would like to gear my career towards finance and PE if possible.

    -Thanks

  • Soros's picture

    Lets talk about how green the grass is over there. I'm in audit and I'm wondering if I should abandon my goals of going to "high finance" (buy or sell side...). The hours are manageable here, comp is decent and progressive, and exit opps are decent. I know I won't be a millionaire (through employment) any time soon but it is stable and I can expect around 100K comp in around 7 years.

    Do you think it is absolutely worth it to go for the switch? I don't see anything about the hours on here but how are the hours? Dare I ask compensation? You said you were a HF analyst, could you give us an example of your duties and what makes the job so much more awesome thank audit (besides not having to do controls testing).

  • In reply to GrandJury
    itsinthebag's picture

    GrandJury wrote:
    Thanks for answering so many questions, I feel that they have tremendously benefited a lot of posters here. I have a few questions of my own also.

    1) As an undergrad, did you do any relevant internships in either accounting/finance?

    2) Were the headhunters you connected with through Linkedin eager to help you or did you have to work your way into their interest?

    3) Could you explain a little bit more in detail how you handled the technical questions in the interview thought process wise?

    Thanks for your time.

    (1) Finance internship (nothing special or amazing) and that's it - was able to explain my lack of relevant internships due to the fact that I decided to take accounting courses late in my college career and was essentially taking 6 classes per quarter for 6 quarters (pretty much in class all day long, no possible opportunity to work 20 hrs/wk)

    (2) Hit or miss, some were nice, some were useless. Really depends on the headhunter. Great thing is there are millions of them so just keep reaching out to different ones.

    (3) Just walk them through your thought process - very similar to the case studies for consulting interviews. Be as specific as you can, even explaining the most rudimentary steps and be able to explain your rationale

  • In reply to MitchKumstein
    itsinthebag's picture

    MitchKumstein wrote:
    As someone who went Big4 Audit -> TS -> IB, I just want to confirm that everything itsinthebag has said is absolutely accurate.

    Many people in audit don't realize that if you perform well, stay intellectually curious, and get out early enough, your exit opps can be quite broad. These exit opps narrow out the longer you stay.

    Thanks for the support. Much appreciated.

  • In reply to MitchKumstein
    itsinthebag's picture

    MitchKumstein wrote:
    As someone who went Big4 Audit -> TS -> IB, I just want to confirm that everything itsinthebag has said is absolutely accurate.

    Many people in audit don't realize that if you perform well, stay intellectually curious, and get out early enough, your exit opps can be quite broad. These exit opps narrow out the longer you stay.

    Thanks for the support. Much appreciated.

  • In reply to Juniper
    itsinthebag's picture

    Juniper wrote:
    If you could have started directly in TAS instead of auditing would you have. I am trying to decide between Big 4 Audit position or due diligence assoicate with Duff & Phelps. I ultimately would like to gear my career towards finance and PE if possible.

    -Thanks

    Without a doubt, yes.

  • In reply to Ruskii
    itsinthebag's picture

    Ruskii wrote:
    1.) For those entering Audit(Financial Services) how quickly would you advise them to start looking for finance related opportunities?

    0-1 years before qualifying for the CPA
    1-2 years after qualifying for CPA but before making Senior
    2 years after making Senior

    2.) Or do you believe that staying adds no value and you should begin the process right away

    Also you mentioned that you chose not to pursue the CFA, do you believe that having a level or two out of the way would help you with recruiters/networking/interviews?

    Thank you, I registered here just to ask!

    ASAP; also work on getting your CPA license in case your search extends beyond a year. The longer you stay in audit, the harder it will be to transition into finance. Just make sure you have a legitimate "why finance" and "why you started in audit" story.

    With regards to the CFA - I don't see why not, it's definitely not a golden ticket by any means but could show your potential and desire to work in finance.

  • FutureWaller's picture

    Thanks for the great post. I think this is something alot of WSO users are interested in. That being said, I have a question for you. I will be working in Audit at Deloitte/PwC after graduation. I have heard that one should audit the field they wish to pursue, but from what you have said this is wrong. You said "I have audited PE/VC/HF clients and the knowledge gained from those engagements has done absolutely nothing for me in my current capacity." For a first year Auditor, what industry should I try and get into if my ultimate goal is PE/VC/HF.
    Thanks

  • In reply to Soros
    itsinthebag's picture

    Soros wrote:
    Lets talk about how green the grass is over there. I'm in audit and I'm wondering if I should abandon my goals of going to "high finance" (buy or sell side...). The hours are manageable here, comp is decent and progressive, and exit opps are decent. I know I won't be a millionaire (through employment) any time soon but it is stable and I can expect around 100K comp in around 7 years.

    Do you think it is absolutely worth it to go for the switch? I don't see anything about the hours on here but how are the hours? Dare I ask compensation? You said you were a HF analyst, could you give us an example of your duties and what makes the job so much more awesome thank audit (besides not having to do controls testing).

    Oh man, you just opened up a can of worms. Please bear with me on this post as there may be some rambling. You have essentially asked me what I hated about audit (everything), but I'll do my best to keep it concise.

    You must be a first year. Not going to lie, my first year in audit I had those exact same thoughts - hours and pay weren't that bad and I was learning a lot. I think the belief that your pay isn't bad is attributed to the fact that you've never made this much money in your life for a mere 2 weeks of work. Trust me, it quickly fades. The moment I began to senior an engagement, saw how many hours I was working vs. what they were paying me, as well as how ridiculously mundane/boring my work was, I quickly began the process of jumping ship. One example - sending emails to facilitate a meeting between the partner, manager and client. Partners never respond to you, the client gets angry at you and all you can do is sit there while the client yells at you with a smile on your face because it's proper client service. You'll quickly find a majority of the issues seniors deal with are administrative related and firm-specific (e.g., navigating your firm's internal website to request a tax consultant or valuation consultant, etc..) and mastering these skills provides zero transferable skills to any other job. I can easily list another 5-10 things I hated about being a senior but won't, for brevity purposes.

    Comp progression is ridiculously slow, don't believe any of those charts you see where they say you'll be 1.5x your salary in 3 years or whatever. That is ONLY for the #1 performer in the firm. If you're #2, don't expect to be on that salary progression. I was consistently top-rated, up for early promotion and always thought I would get more than what they actually ended up giving me. Compensation discussions were always a huge disappointment and I always left with a sore bum and there's nothing you can do to change your pay raise. Threaten to quit? Go ahead, they'll find another drone who is more than willing to replace you. Transfer to another firm? OK, you've gotten a one-time pay raise, but what happens next year? The same thing, and you can't keep transferring between firms. Also, later found out some of my peers were higher rated than me even though I had other managers tell me my work was extremely better- it's just that they had a great personal relationship with the partners since their internship (I did not intern at Big 4; these guys were literally golfing with the partners on the weekend), and as such, their political capital = higher rating. I want to work in a culture where my pay is determined by my quality of work, not my golf handicap (I'm like a weed whacker out there on the course).

    My base salary is 30-50% higher than what I left at audit. I also have an annual bonus % significantly higher than the bonus % allocated for seniors (think 8-12x multiple). Every time I read a 10K and see a restatement, discontinued segments, foreign exchange translations, consolidations, essentially every footnote, a HUGE smile spreads across my face because I know the sweat and pain that went into making sure that number was correct. I'm grateful for your help, but I'm happy I'm not doing the work. Also, not to mention with busy season around the corner, it's nice to know I won't be working on MLK day for a change and can book vacation any time during the year (my firm would not let anyone take PTO during busy season, I even had to reschedule jury duty).

    In terms of hours, I work about 12-15 hours a day, but the hours are not an issue (I was working about 10-12 hours a day as an audit senior for comparison purposes) because I actually enjoy what I do, I am actually learning transferable skills should I decide to leave and the pay is that much better. Not to mention, whenever I get tired, I just think about how I could be still in audit and that automatically gets my gears cranking again. Also, I have ridiculous perks at my firm which you do not have in audit. I used to enjoy the travel, but it got old quickly as I was commuting by car, not by air. It's nice to be able to go to the same place every day and have your own office versus a crammed audit room that usually has no windows.

    For me, the grass truly is greener on the other side.

  • In reply to itsinthebag
    marine13910's picture

    Asian Monkey, I'd have say a possible answer to the question is it depends. It might be an outlier, but I did 2 years big 4 audit in a specific industry and received a promotion to Senior Associate 1 year early, then did 1 year in transaction services-financial due diligence, and then landed a manager level economic demand/revenue forecasting job at a F100 in the same industry I used to audit. So in total, that's only 3 years experience. Given this was a less traditional movement (ie movement from accounting to finance), I can't imagine that high performing accountants with 5 years experience haven't been able to land manager level accounting jobs at a larger public company, so I don't believe these types of moves would be exclusive to startups or smaller companies. I've never paid much attention to the typical exit ops that auditors pursue as I've only focused on those who picked up interesting gigs. I can say i've seen a nasty trend of auditors becoming so fed up with their jobs that they rushed through the recruitment process in desperate desire to get out, and accepted really sub-par accounting/internal audit/financial reporting jobs at some dumpy companies. Not sure what their logic was other than lack of career planning/initiative/ and understanding of exit ops available.

    Some really good content in this post, 100% spot on w the assertion that auditing financial service type client VC/PE/MF/HF has the least transferable skill set to an actual finance job. You're auditing the backoffice work of some of the sloppiest financial info on those clients, whereas an audit of a tech or pharma company can provide some functional industry insight that's directly transferable to ER and investing.

  • In reply to itsinthebag
    marine13910's picture

    Asian Monkey, I'd have say a possible answer to the question is it depends. It might be an outlier, but I did 2 years big 4 audit in a specific industry and received a promotion to Senior Associate 1 year early, then did 1 year in transaction services-financial due diligence, and then landed a manager level economic demand/revenue forecasting job at a F100 in the same industry I used to audit. So in total, that's only 3 years experience. Given this was a less traditional movement (ie movement from accounting to finance), I can't imagine that high performing accountants with 5 years experience haven't been able to land manager level accounting jobs at a larger public company, so I don't believe these types of moves would be exclusive to startups or smaller companies. I've never paid much attention to the typical exit ops that auditors pursue as I've only focused on those who picked up interesting gigs. I can say i've seen a nasty trend of auditors becoming so fed up with their jobs that they rushed through the recruitment process in desperate desire to get out, and accepted really sub-par accounting/internal audit/financial reporting jobs at some dumpy companies. Not sure what their logic was other than lack of career planning/initiative/ and understanding of exit ops available.

    Some really good content in this post, 100% spot on w the assertion that auditing financial service type client VC/PE/MF/HF has the least transferable skill set to an actual finance job. You're auditing the backoffice work of some of the sloppiest financial info on those clients, whereas an audit of a tech or pharma company can provide some functional industry insight that's directly transferable to ER and investing.

  • In reply to FutureWaller
    itsinthebag's picture

    FutureWaller wrote:
    Thanks for the great post. I think this is something alot of WSO users are interested in. That being said, I have a question for you. I will be working in Audit at Deloitte/PwC after graduation. I have heard that one should audit the field they wish to pursue, but from what you have said this is wrong. You said "I have audited PE/VC/HF clients and the knowledge gained from those engagements has done absolutely nothing for me in my current capacity." For a first year Auditor, what industry should I try and get into if my ultimate goal is PE/VC/HF.
    Thanks

    It is a true statement for people who wish to continue in accounting, not make the switch to finance - there is a major difference. If you want to be a controller at a software company, you'd better audit a software company to learn about the financial reporting requirements and the accounting nuances of the industry. However, you are attempting to switch careers so you should work in the industry you want to be in at the PE/VC/HF. If your end goal is tech VC, then audit tech companies, if you want to do retail PE, then audit consumer goods, etc...

    I hope this makes sense (staying in accounting vs. switching careers), please let me know if it doesn't and I will do my best to further clarify. This is a major misconception and constantly proliferated through bro-science.

  • In reply to marine13910
    itsinthebag's picture

    marine13910 wrote:
    Asian Monkey, I'd have say a possible answer to the question is it depends. It might be an outlier, but I did 2 years big 4 audit in a specific industry and received a promotion to Senior Associate 1 year early, then did 1 year in transaction services-financial due diligence, and then landed a manager level economic demand/revenue forecasting job at a F100 in the same industry I used to audit. So in total, that's only 3 years experience. Given this was a less traditional movement (ie movement from accounting to finance), I can't imagine that high performing accountants with 5 years experience haven't been able to land manager level accounting jobs at a larger public company, so I don't believe these types of moves would be exclusive to startups or smaller companies. I've never paid much attention to the typical exit ops that auditors pursue as I've only focused on those who picked up interesting gigs. I can say i've seen a nasty trend of auditors becoming so fed up with their jobs that they rushed through the recruitment process in desperate desire to get out, and accepted really sub-par accounting/internal audit/financial reporting jobs at some dumpy companies. Not sure what their logic was other than lack of career planning/initiative/ and understanding of exit ops available.

    Some really good content in this post, 100% spot on w the assertion that auditing financial service type client VC/PE/MF/HF has the least transferable skill set to an actual finance job. You're auditing the backoffice work of some of the sloppiest financial info on those clients, whereas an audit of a tech or pharma company can provide some functional industry insight that's directly transferable to ER and investing.

    Thanks for your input. I would like to stress that you had to leave audit and gain other skills necessary to obtain the manager level role. I believe Asian Monkey's misconception is that you can stay in audit for 5 years and make a direct transition to a F500 at the manager level, which I would like to stress, is not possible.

    I try to avoid saying nothing is impossible (especially given my background), but this is one of the few exceptions.

  • marine13910's picture

    Another note on Big 4 compensation. I've built comp models out of boredom around this idea. Comp at all levels other than partner is terrible. At all Staff-Sr. Mgr/Director levels, you are underpaid by an incremental amount equal to the difference between what a partner makes and what an equivelently successful accountant (lets say F500 VP level) would make, for all the partner years, multiplied by the probability of making partner, discounted to present value and spread throughout the years as a non-partner.

    What this equation should tell anyone who plans to stay at the big 4 longer than a couple years but without intent to stay long enough to make partner is that when you remove the possibility of making partner (and giant potential salary) you are vastly underpaid.

    For anyone considering big 4 as a stepping stone to finance, it's important to remember that anything is possible, but you will likely hate the act of auditing. Auditors may technically be front office staff for a firm, but the work entails reviewing the sloppy, lazy backoffice work of financial reporting types. Since financial reporting is nothing more than a cost center to a company, a company will never invest in improving it, and certainly won't do so when they already pay the big 4 auditor large sums to get comfortable with the mess. There are few people who find this even slightly tolerable, and those who do simply don't understand what's really taking place (a zero value add career should wear out just about anyone with cognative brain activity).

  • greatlakes77's picture

    Itsinthebag, thank you for the wonderful post! Like your former self, I just started my second year as a staff and am looking to transition out of audit ASAP (I have my CPA). I have a couple of questions:

    1. Which is better - Business Valuation or Due Dilligence/TAS at the Big 4? I'm looking to transfer into one of these roles and based on the job descriptions, Due Dilligence just sounds like auditing for M&As, whereas business valuation seems like it is more finance related (valuation of financial instruments, intangible assets, etc). Which role would have more interesting work and better compensation and exit opportunities into industry roles down the road (strategy/corporate development/internal M&A etc)?

    2. Does a "Sales Financial Analyst" job at a F100 company fall under the "corporate accounting" role you described in your post? I am currently interviewing for a position in Sales Finance at a well known F100 firm and the job is mostly a lot of forecasting analysis, analyzing customer P/Ls, working with the sales people to determine sales budgets etc. The work sounds interesting to me, but I don't know if I'm better off pursuing the TAS/Business Valuation role at a Big 4.

    I don't know how feasible a transition into TAS/BVal will be given that my first year ratings were average (which is what 90% of the first years get). Is it possible to transition into TAS at another Big 4 and is it harder than transitioning internally? I know ratings are key, so should I not expect to get an internal transfer if I'm not in the top bucket?

    Thanks for your help!

  • In reply to greatlakes77
    itsinthebag's picture

    greatlakes77 wrote:
    Itsinthebag, thank you for the wonderful post! Like your former self, I just started my second year as a staff and am looking to transition out of audit ASAP (I have my CPA). I have a couple of questions:

    1. Which is better - Business Valuation or Due Dilligence/TAS at the Big 4? I'm looking to transfer into one of these roles and based on the job descriptions, Due Dilligence just sounds like auditing for M&As, whereas business valuation seems like it is more finance related (valuation of financial instruments, intangible assets, etc). Which role would have more interesting work and better compensation and exit opportunities into industry roles down the road (strategy/corporate development/internal M&A etc)?

    2. Does a "Sales Financial Analyst" job at a F100 company fall under the "corporate accounting" role you described in your post? I am currently interviewing for a position in Sales Finance at a well known F100 firm and the job is mostly a lot of forecasting analysis, analyzing customer P/Ls, working with the sales people to determine sales budgets etc. The work sounds interesting to me, but I don't know if I'm better off pursuing the TAS/Business Valuation role at a Big 4.

    I don't know how feasible a transition into TAS/BVal will be given that my first year ratings were average (which is what 90% of the first years get). Is it possible to transition into TAS at another Big 4 and is it harder than transitioning internally? I know ratings are key, so should I not expect to get an internal transfer if I'm not in the top bucket?

    Thanks for your help!

    #1 - correct, TAS is essentially a glorified audit position, but you are closer to the transaction process and begin to develop financial skills, which are both relevant skills necessary to make the leap to IBD. Business valuation is a different type of finance. If you take a look at your business valuation principals/partners, they most likely all have CFA's and I'd be hard pressed to find an M&A partner with a CFA. Depends on where you want to go as each path leads to a different type of finance.

    #2 - doesn't sound like it based on your daily responsibilities - just make sure there's no month-end closing involved.

    #3 - I would recommend looking at non Big 4's (e.g., Alvarez & Marsal, Duff & Phelps, Houlihan Lokey, etc...) and leaving your Big 4 firm all together. In my office, they only accepted manager & above for a rotation into the TAS arm, but could be different at your firm. Also, my office would rotate the TAS people into audit engagements when there were no active deals and I wanted to leave audit for good.

  • In reply to itsinthebag
    nyboarder's picture

    itsinthebag wrote:
    just make sure there's no month-end closing involved.

    Can you expand on this? I'm currently looking at an internship with an F500, which would involve quarter-end and some month-end closings, as well as some analysis of these (what they mean, and if they are compliant.) The job focuses on budgets as opposed to revenues.

    I know that you're coming from the public side of things, but would you say any of this has relevance?

  • Siddhartha's picture

    Itsinthebag, thank you for doing this! Do you know if it is possible to do Audit -> ER or would you have to go Audit -> MBA -> ER. I am aware that ER does not do very much hiring out of UG, so I am looking at other ways of breaking in.

  • Higheck123's picture

    Would you be able to give a few details on what you do as an audit intern at big 4? I do not know if I want to go down this route but the summer internship seems like a good opportunity to get some training and experience. Also, do you think if I chose to not continue with public accounting after an internship, that the big 4 name would grab the attention of hr? Just want to get a better idea of what I am getting into and what I can look forward to in the future.

  • In reply to nyboarder
    itsinthebag's picture

    equitydigger wrote:
    itsinthebag wrote:
    just make sure there's no month-end closing involved.

    Can you expand on this? I'm currently looking at an internship with an F500, which would involve quarter-end and some month-end closings, as well as some analysis of these (what they mean, and if they are compliant.) The job focuses on budgets as opposed to revenues.

    I know that you're coming from the public side of things, but would you say any of this has relevance?

    Month-end closing: An accounting procedure undertaken at the end of the month to close out the current posting period. It is part of a company's closing operations.

    Relevance to what exactly?

  • In reply to Siddhartha
    itsinthebag's picture

    Siddhartha wrote:
    Itsinthebag, thank you for doing this! Do you know if it is possible to do Audit -> ER or would you have to go Audit -> MBA -> ER. I am aware that ER does not do very much hiring out of UG, so I am looking at other ways of breaking in.

    I did not look into ER jobs so I honestly have no clue. None of my audit peers pursued ER, but I think that's more a function of everyone in audit wanting to pursue IBD/FP&A - a lot of auditors only shoot for IBD/FP&A because it's their only concept of finance. I'm sure it's possible if you work hard enough.

  • In reply to Higheck123
    itsinthebag's picture

    Higheck123 wrote:
    Would you be able to give a few details on what you do as an audit intern at big 4? I do not know if I want to go down this route but the summer internship seems like a good opportunity to get some training and experience. Also, do you think if I chose to not continue with public accounting after an internship, that the big 4 name would grab the attention of hr? Just want to get a better idea of what I am getting into and what I can look forward to in the future.

    40 hr/wks, social gatherings (national training is awesome), free gifts and pranks. From a work perspective, mostly updating dates, excel formatting (bold, italicize, highlight, underline some words/numbers/cells) and grabbing lunch. Depending on your potential, they may give you some basic cash testing, flux analysis (analyze movement in accounts over periods of time) or control testing.

    I was not an intern, but I did work with several interns - one I actually gave cash testing to, the other I played pranks on all day. They both ended up getting FT offers so don't think that if you're only getting lunch all day you're not going to get a FT offer.

    Yes, after IBD/Consulting, Big 4 on your resume is the best option.

  • In reply to itsinthebag
    calikid3820's picture

    itsinthebag wrote:

    #1 - correct, TAS is essentially a glorified audit position, but you are closer to the transaction process and begin to develop financial skills, which are both relevant skills necessary to make the leap to IBD. Business valuation is a different type of finance. If you take a look at your business valuation principals/partners, they most likely all have CFA's and I'd be hard pressed to find an M&A partner with a CFA. Depends on where you want to go as each path leads to a different type of finance.

    #2 - doesn't sound like it based on your daily responsibilities - just make sure there's no month-end closing involved.

    #3 - I would recommend looking at non Big 4's (e.g., Alvarez & Marsal, Duff & Phelps, Houlihan Lokey, etc...) and leaving your Big 4 firm all together. In my office, they only accepted manager & above for a rotation into the TAS arm, but could be different at your firm. Also, my office would rotate the TAS people into audit engagements when there were no active deals and I wanted to leave audit for good.

    Can you elaborate on #1?

    What kind of career path would Business Valuation take you towards in terms of Exit Opp to Finance. Would Business Valuation look better to PE or would TAS still be the top choice?

  • In reply to itsinthebag
    MistaBooks's picture

    itsinthebag wrote:
    greatlakes77 wrote:
    Itsinthebag, thank you for the wonderful post! Like your former self, I just started my second year as a staff and am looking to transition out of audit ASAP (I have my CPA). I have a couple of questions:

    1. Which is better - Business Valuation or Due Dilligence/TAS at the Big 4? I'm looking to transfer into one of these roles and based on the job descriptions, Due Dilligence just sounds like auditing for M&As, whereas business valuation seems like it is more finance related (valuation of financial instruments, intangible assets, etc). Which role would have more interesting work and better compensation and exit opportunities into industry roles down the road (strategy/corporate development/internal M&A etc)?

    2. Does a "Sales Financial Analyst" job at a F100 company fall under the "corporate accounting" role you described in your post? I am currently interviewing for a position in Sales Finance at a well known F100 firm and the job is mostly a lot of forecasting analysis, analyzing customer P/Ls, working with the sales people to determine sales budgets etc. The work sounds interesting to me, but I don't know if I'm better off pursuing the TAS/Business Valuation role at a Big 4.

    I don't know how feasible a transition into TAS/BVal will be given that my first year ratings were average (which is what 90% of the first years get). Is it possible to transition into TAS at another Big 4 and is it harder than transitioning internally? I know ratings are key, so should I not expect to get an internal transfer if I'm not in the top bucket?

    Thanks for your help!

    #1 - correct, TAS is essentially a glorified audit position, but you are closer to the transaction process and begin to develop financial skills, which are both relevant skills necessary to make the leap to IBD. Business valuation is a different type of finance. If you take a look at your business valuation principals/partners, they most likely all have CFA's and I'd be hard pressed to find an M&A partner with a CFA. Depends on where you want to go as each path leads to a different type of finance.

    #2 - doesn't sound like it based on your daily responsibilities - just make sure there's no month-end closing involved.

    #3 - I would recommend looking at non Big 4's (e.g., Alvarez & Marsal, Duff & Phelps, Houlihan Lokey, etc...) and leaving your Big 4 firm all together. In my office, they only accepted manager & above for a rotation into the TAS arm, but could be different at your firm. Also, my office would rotate the TAS people into audit engagements when there were no active deals and I wanted to leave audit for good.

    I agree with most every you have said - but I have to disagree that valuation is a better way to break into a finance related role vs. due dilligence. From my experience ( just over a year at big 4 in major city ) and having done a rotation into the due dilligence group, I have seen guys from the group leave for IBD gigs / top MBA's / top consulting shops on the regular.

    Valuation on the other hand is much more aligned with audit and is, in essence, an audit support function. They have 'busy seasons' just like auditors b/c the majority of their work is simply giving a 'fairness' opinion / saying they are comfortable with valuations that a third party has assigned to an audit client on stock options / intangibles / etc.

    You could argue that you are exposed to 'valuation models' and that you can pick up a lot of knowledge - to me that is the only argument to be made with regards to valuation over FDD. On the other hand - you could make teh same argument for FDD - and an even stronger argument. When you're in the FDD group the majority of the work you do is quality of earnings analysis / NWC adjustments / really just look for any 'black holes' that the bank / buyer has missed. You are given full access to the data-rooms / the private equity guys models & cash flow projections, etc.

    There is a TREMENDOUS amount of knowledge to be gained from exposure to this type of stuff if your ultimate goal is to jump to IBD / PE.

    I have no experience in the valuations group, but from what I have gathered while working on an audit client that used them / my time in TAS, they are basically ticking / tying someone's models & making sure nothing was left out...

    Am I going wrong here?

  • In reply to itsinthebag
    nyboarder's picture

    itsinthebag wrote:
    equitydigger wrote:
    itsinthebag wrote:
    just make sure there's no month-end closing involved.

    Can you expand on this? I'm currently looking at an internship with an F500, which would involve quarter-end and some month-end closings, as well as some analysis of these (what they mean, and if they are compliant.) The job focuses on budgets as opposed to revenues.

    I know that you're coming from the public side of things, but would you say any of this has relevance?

    Month-end closing: An accounting procedure undertaken at the end of the month to close out the current posting period. It is part of a company's closing operations.

    Relevance to what exactly?

    Relevance to what you're doing right now. I'm sure closing doesn't, but I was hoping the analysis aspect would teach me some useful things about the mechanics of the company. I'm just trying to figure out how I can leverage this experience to learn something useful for security analysis.

  • In reply to MistaBooks
    calikid3820's picture

    MistaBooks wrote:

    I agree with most every you have said - but I have to disagree that valuation is a better way to break into a finance related role vs. due dilligence. From my experience ( just over a year at big 4 in major city ) and having done a rotation into the due dilligence group, I have seen guys from the group leave for IBD gigs / top MBA's / top consulting shops on the regular.

    Valuation on the other hand is much more aligned with audit and is, in essence, an audit support function. They have 'busy seasons' just like auditors b/c the majority of their work is simply giving a 'fairness' opinion / saying they are comfortable with valuations that a third party has assigned to an audit client on stock options / intangibles / etc.

    You could argue that you are exposed to 'valuation models' and that you can pick up a lot of knowledge - to me that is the only argument to be made with regards to valuation over FDD. On the other hand - you could make teh same argument for FDD - and an even stronger argument. When you're in the FDD group the majority of the work you do is quality of earnings analysis / NWC adjustments / really just look for any 'black holes' that the bank / buyer has missed. You are given full access to the data-rooms / the private equity guys models & cash flow projections, etc.

    There is a TREMENDOUS amount of knowledge to be gained from exposure to this type of stuff if your ultimate goal is to jump to IBD / PE.

    I have no experience in the valuations group, but from what I have gathered while working on an audit client that used them / my time in TAS, they are basically ticking / tying someone's models & making sure nothing was left out...

    Am I going wrong here?

    cool this answers my question. I see the value in that and after that explanation would much rather do the Due Diligence in the TAS group

  • thedude12r43w's picture

    What is the typical pay range for staff, senior, and manager. What is the typical % increase each year?

  • In reply to MistaBooks
    itsinthebag's picture

    itsinthebag wrote:
    greatlakes77 wrote:

    #1 - correct, TAS is essentially a glorified audit position, but you are closer to the transaction process and begin to develop financial skills, which are both relevant skills necessary to make the leap to IBD. Business valuation is a different type of finance. If you take a look at your business valuation principals/partners, they most likely all have CFA's and I'd be hard pressed to find an M&A partner with a CFA. Depends on where you want to go as each path leads to a different type of finance.

    #2 - doesn't sound like it based on your daily responsibilities - just make sure there's no month-end closing involved.

    #3 - I would recommend looking at non Big 4's (e.g., Alvarez & Marsal, Duff & Phelps, Houlihan Lokey, etc...) and leaving your Big 4 firm all together. In my office, they only accepted manager & above for a rotation into the TAS arm, but could be different at your firm. Also, my office would rotate the TAS people into audit engagements when there were no active deals and I wanted to leave audit for good.

    I agree with most every you have said - but I have to disagree that valuation is a better way to break into a finance related role vs. due dilligence. From my experience ( just over a year at big 4 in major city ) and having done a rotation into the due dilligence group, I have seen guys from the group leave for IBD gigs / top MBA's / top consulting shops on the regular.

    Valuation on the other hand is much more aligned with audit and is, in essence, an audit support function. They have 'busy seasons' just like auditors b/c the majority of their work is simply giving a 'fairness' opinion / saying they are comfortable with valuations that a third party has assigned to an audit client on stock options / intangibles / etc.

    You could argue that you are exposed to 'valuation models' and that you can pick up a lot of knowledge - to me that is the only argument to be made with regards to valuation over FDD. On the other hand - you could make teh same argument for FDD - and an even stronger argument. When you're in the FDD group the majority of the work you do is quality of earnings analysis / NWC adjustments / really just look for any 'black holes' that the bank / buyer has missed. You are given full access to the data-rooms / the private equity guys models & cash flow projections, etc.

    There is a TREMENDOUS amount of knowledge to be gained from exposure to this type of stuff if your ultimate goal is to jump to IBD / PE.

    I have no experience in the valuations group, but from what I have gathered while working on an audit client that used them / my time in TAS, they are basically ticking / tying someone's models & making sure nothing was left out...

    Am I going wrong here?

    No where do I mention valuation is a better way to break into finance vs. due diligence. I said they are different types of finance. Nothing you said was wrong.

  • In reply to itsinthebag
    thedude12r43w's picture

    itsinthebag wrote:

    Yes, after IBD/Consulting, Big 4 on your resume is the best option.

    Just to confirm, this was in relation to a junior year internship or for FT? I thought having Big 4 on your resume is essentially being branded as an accountant which makes it really difficult to transition to non-accounting roles.

    I was also wondering for people who cant break directly into IB out of undergrad, what types of jobs do you recommend they go after to have the best opportunity to lateral (or break in post-MBA0? Perhaps you can rank these jobs and show where big4 stays relative to the non-IBD jobs.

  • In reply to thedude12r43w
    itsinthebag's picture

    n1cktm wrote:
    What is the typical pay range for staff, senior, and manager. What is the typical % increase each year?

    Varies based on your region and whether or not you have an advanced degree. % increase varies based on your region, individual performance and firm's overall performance. Beginning salary will range from $45K-$55K with an undergrad degree, tack an additional $5K for MACC/MBA. I have seen % increases range from 2% - 25%.

  • Ruskii's picture

    How did you go about scheduling interviews and job hunting while working? Were you able to schedule most before/after work or did you have to great creative about absences. Any additional thoughts would be good!

    Thanks for the insights!

  • In reply to Ruskii
    greatlakes77's picture

    Ruskii wrote:
    How did you go about scheduling interviews and job hunting while working? Were you able to schedule most before/after work or did you have to great creative about absences. Any additional thoughts would be good!

    Thanks for the insights!

    Would like to know this too!

    And thanks for your earlier response.

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