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How often do you guys actually get to go out? I'd imagine with the hours that people get out maybe once friday or saturday at best, but even then I'm not sure how easy that would be.

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Comments (38)

  • FinancePun's picture

    I've always been more of the nerdy dungeons and dragons type so I don't club that often, if at all. I can't imagine IBD guys do much though. Still curious. How can you guys keep such intense office hours and then do anything else but sleep or veg out?

    "Dude, not trying to be a dick here, but your shop looks like a frontrunner for the cover of Better Boilerrooms & Chophouses or Bucketshop Quarterly."

    -Uncle Eddie

  • Gekko21's picture

    Depends. Banking ovbiously less, but sales and trading can go out two or three times a week if they wanted to. Also, Weds and Thursday are pretty big nights to go on Wall Street.

    "Greed, in all of its forms; greed for life, for money, for love, for knowledge has marked the upward surge of mankind. And greed, you mark my words, will not only save Teldar Paper, but that other malfunctioning corporation called the USA."

  • happypantsmcgee's picture

    This is more directed at FinancePun than the OP but part of blowing off steam is going out, maybe getting hammered (ok, definitely getting hammered) and having a good time. There are times when I do want to go home and do nothing but watch every repeat of SportsCenter for 5 hours but thats not common. (To be fair, I work fucking disgusting hours but its not as intense as some of these other guys)

    If I had asked people what they wanted, they would have said faster horses - Henry Ford

  • In reply to happypantsmcgee
    FinancePun's picture

    happypantsmcgee:
    This is more directed at FinancePun than the OP but part of blowing off steam is going out, maybe getting hammered (ok, definitely getting hammered) and having a good time. There are times when I do want to go home and do nothing but watch every repeat of SportsCenter for 5 hours but thats not common. (To be fair, I work fucking disgusting hours but its not as intense as some of these other guys)

    Well that's perfectly fair and certainly makes sense. Are there more clubs around Wall St. or is the clubbing more around the Meatpacking district/Chelsea? I'm over on park ave. and it's pretty sleepy around here after work, barring the Irish pubs (which is where my office blows off steam).

    "Dude, not trying to be a dick here, but your shop looks like a frontrunner for the cover of Better Boilerrooms & Chophouses or Bucketshop Quarterly."

    -Uncle Eddie

  • happypantsmcgee's picture

    Check out Therapy dude its a badass club (look it up before you go though)

    If I had asked people what they wanted, they would have said faster horses - Henry Ford

  • IlliniProgrammer's picture

    If you are renting an apartment in Manhattan your first year, you're essentially living hand-to-mouth on an analyst salary before you even go out clubbing. If you willingly go into credit card debt on $8 drinks and $30 covers (or worse, $1500 bottle service), you may not be as shrewd of a financier as you think.

    I recommend a trip to Fairway and picking up a 6-pack of Hofbrau or Yuengling and inviting friends over for poker and board games for your first year instead. That's what we did three years ago. You may just decide to make a habit of it. When you're retired at the age of 35, you can keep calling your friends up for board games- you'll just have to be careful about not kicking too much sand on the Settlers of Katan board while you sit on the beach in Hawaii. Meanwhile, your friends who went clubbing at 22 in New York will still be working- and still going out every evening- and will be incredibly jealous of folks whose work every day constitutes rigging either a hang glider or a katamaran.

  • big unit's picture

    ^Is this a joke?

    Playing board games instead of going out? I'm assuming its a joke but I can't tell.

    I was on the S&T side of things working 6:30am - 7:00pm on average. As a first year, went out like 30% of Thursdays and pretty much every Saturday and Sunday.

    Since my friends weren't into board games, we just pregamed for a couple of hours each night and then went out. Prob spent $150 a weekend on booze (in top of like $200 on food and random stuff).

    One weekend a month would get ridiculous and we'd prob spend $1000 between 4-5 of us, but again, all in good fun.

    Rarely went out on Sunday-Wed. besides the all-you can drink at a Jets bar during games, and I ate seamless for dinner each work day.

  • In reply to big unit
    cphbravo96's picture

    big unit:
    ^Is this a joke?

    Playing board games instead of going out? I'm assuming its a joke but I can't tell.

    I was on the S&T side of things working 6:30am - 7:00pm on average. As a first year, went out like 30% of Thursdays and pretty much every Saturday and Sunday.

    Since my friends weren't into board games, we just pregamed for a couple of hours each night and then went out. Prob spent $150 a weekend on booze (in top of like $200 on food and random stuff).

    One weekend a month would get ridiculous and we'd prob spend $1000 between 4-5 of us, but again, all in good fun.

    Rarely went out on Sunday-Wed. besides the all-you can drink at a Jets bar during games, and I ate seamless for dinner each work day.

    Sadly, he's for real. If you get around to reading his post they all revolve around the midwest and saving every penny and not having fun, lol.

    IP, I'm not trying to be an ass by pointing that out, I'm just sayin', not everyone wants to go gliding on the weekends and save every penny so they can retire when they are 35, some people want to live a little now and would prefer to have a couple drinks with friends after work and pick up a some ass...not play LIFE and Monopoly.

    I would have to have an awful lot of money, probably $20mm+ (liquid), to retire at 35 because frankly, being the only retired 35 year old (that I would know of) doesn't seem to be much fun in my mind. I guess you can hang around some senior citizens and shark them at shuffle board but I think that would get really old really fast.

    With that said, I respect your decision, because to each his own. As a matter of fact, my father raised me to have the same mindset but I had an ex-gf of mine teach me the importance of living a little bit because you never know when your life can be taken from you. And by life, I don't necessary mean death, but more of a death sentence (horrible analogy)...like loss of limb, cancer, etc. that would/could limit your ability to participate in activities later in life.

    Just keep in mind that there are two sides to every coin.

    Regards

    "The trouble with our liberal friends is not that they're ignorant, it's just that they know so much that isn't so."
    - Ronald Reagan

  • brassmonkee's picture

    I appreciate the input Illini always brings, but I have to say he does not sound like a fun dude to hang out with based on his posts.

    I would worry more about doing well at work than how many days you can still go out your first year. You'll probably be able to get out once or twice a week, but don't be surprised if you have stretches of 2-3 weeks where you don't have the time or energy to go out at all.

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  • mr1234's picture

    personally, i would rather play board games with illini than hang with the rest of you chumps.

    you need a reality check if you think that clubbing and 'smashing' is some kind of hobby. it might sound cool in internet forums, but life isnt an episode of jersey shore.

    ---
    man made the money, money never made the man

  • big unit's picture

    I'm not trying to be mean to the dude who players Settlers of Katan but put it this way - going out isn't as expensive as some people pretend and its a lot more fun....I buy a handle of jack. 3-5 girls and guys show up with a couple 18 packs of beer around 9 or 10pm.

    We drink, listen to music, go out at 11:30pm and we're all having a good time. Show up at a decent bar (Phoebes, Bowery Electric) etc. Since I live in Murray Hill and not Hoboken, I can take a $5 cab ride down.

    Maybe drink 1-2 drinks an hour and leave with a girl or my guy friends, go get pizza, come home and watch a movie or something.

    Total cost: $50 each person probably.

  • In reply to big unit
    IlliniProgrammer's picture

    big unit:
    ^Is this a joke?

    Playing board games instead of going out? I'm assuming its a joke but I can't tell.


    No, it's not. I would go out for two or three drinks after work with some friends on Friday nights. And then I would go home and/or meet up with my friends from research and quant analytics for poker or monopoly/risk depending on the evening.

    Monopoly on three or four beers is actually a lot of fun. Especially when one of the quants I'm playing against is making comments like "All your [bases] railroads are belong to us!" I've given up Dungeons and Dragons- board games and beer are one of us quants' and research types' few remaining intellectual pursuits.

    I dunno. Blowing $200 in an evening on food and drinks or cutting back to $20 and going hang gliding the next day PLUS saving $100 for retirement? I'll take the second option, please. And I never got the appeal of going out to some club where the music is blasting at 95 dB and you can't carry on a conversation with anyone. You live in New York City, you're surrounded by some of the greatest intellectual minds on the planet, and you can't find anything fun to talk about. Really???

    Total cost: $50 each person probably.

    Yeah, if you go to a dive bar and order like three or four beers and a burger and give a good tip. I'll do that maybe two or three times a month with friends. $40 is actually a good number for dinner out at a good restaurant with a single alcoholic beverage and a nice tip. But if you want to head out to the Pink Elephant afterwards and want to shell out $8-$9 for beer or $15 for mixed drinks, the costs add up pretty quickly.

    I've been out clubbing in Manhattan a few times and a traditional good time winds up costing $100 pretty easy. After that, we all decided to cut back a little and focus more on board games, poker, and beer at somebody's apartment. It's a lot more intellectually stimulating and you can actually carry on a conversation without shouting at the top of your lungs.

  • abacab's picture

    Save $100 a week, 50 weeks a year, $5000 a year. 5% average gain, 10 years down the road you will end up with about $66K when you retire at age 35. Not sure if I'd plan on living in Hawaii for next 50 years of my life with that kind of savings (I understand that you will have other sources of income).

  • Reveille's picture

    IP - Mensa?

    Pumpkin, you're dating a tumbling, tumbling dickweed.

  • New Yorker's picture

    blowin money fast

  • In reply to Reveille
    IlliniProgrammer's picture

    kseel:
    IP - Mensa?

    Naww. I wouldn't be caught dead joining an organization based on IQs. I took an IQ test a long time ago and scored an 85, so I guess that's good, but I heard somewhere it's possible to score higher than 100 on these things. Shrug... :D

    But chances are if you live and work in New York, you can carry on an intelligent conversation about fiscal policy- or at least about imported beer. (I've gotten kinda highbrow since I moved to NYC- back at Illinois, we'd talk about domestic beer, cars, and football.)

    In any case, I never got the appeal of going to noisy clubs. Talking with people is a lot more fun than drinking beer while listening to REALLY LOUD techno music.

    Save $100 a week, 50 weeks a year, $5000 a year. 5% average gain, 10 years down the road you will end up with about $66K when you retire at age 35. Not sure if I'd plan on living in Hawaii for next 50 years of my life with that kind of savings (I understand that you will have other sources of income).

    The only thing is that's really $200-300/week, because if you're cutting out going to baller clubs, you're probably cutting out other stuff, too. I dunno. If I can net 10%, $5K today turns into a nice (used) convertible or timeshare in ten years. And if I give up a beer at $8 today, that translates into five beers at $4 in Hawaii.

    Finally, part of being able to retire early means keeping your lifestyle under control. And $100/week translates into hundreds of thousands of dollars less money that you need to have saved up to retire with the same lifestyle you're used to. I expect to live on less than 2.5% of my savings when I retire, so $100/week translates into $200K extra in a retirement portfolio.

  • brassmonkee's picture

    At the same time, going out in your 20s while living in NYC is a lot different than going out in your 40s at your timeshare. Different strokes for different folks. I'm more of a seize the day kinda guy.

  • In reply to IlliniProgrammer
    Reveille's picture

    IlliniProgrammer:
    kseel:
    IP - Mensa?

    Naww. I wouldn't be caught dead joining an organization based on IQs. I took an IQ test a long time ago and scored an 85, so I guess that's good, but I heard somewhere it's possible to score higher than 100 on these things. Shrug... :D

    But chances are if you live and work in New York, you can carry on an intelligent conversation about fiscal policy- or at least about imported beer. (I've gotten kinda highbrow since I moved to NYC- back at Illinois, we'd talk about domestic beer, cars, and football.)

    In any case, I never got the appeal of going to noisy clubs. Talking with people is a lot more fun than drinking beer while listening to REALLY LOUD techno music.

    Save $100 a week, 50 weeks a year, $5000 a year. 5% average gain, 10 years down the road you will end up with about $66K when you retire at age 35. Not sure if I'd plan on living in Hawaii for next 50 years of my life with that kind of savings (I understand that you will have other sources of income).

    The only thing is that's really $200-300/week, because if you're cutting out going to baller clubs, you're probably cutting out other stuff, too. I dunno. If I can net 10%, $5K today turns into a nice (used) convertible or timeshare in ten years. And if I give up a beer at $8 today, that translates into five beers at $4 in Hawaii.

    Finally, part of being able to retire early means keeping your lifestyle under control. And $100/week translates into hundreds of thousands of dollars less money that you need to have saved up to retire with the same lifestyle you're used to. I expect to live on less than 2.5% of my savings when I retire, so $100/week translates into $200K extra in a retirement portfolio.

    I know where you're coming from about loud clubs, etc. Unfortunately in some circles it's impossible to avoid going to those places unless you want to ostracize yourself.

    Pumpkin, you're dating a tumbling, tumbling dickweed.

  • Will Hunting's picture

    Im going to go with IP. Loud clubs are breeding grounds for idiots that hate their lives and jobs and try to have sex with cheap bitches so they feel better about themselves. living in hawaii at age 35 with some hot ass Hawaiian chicks catering to me sounds alot better than some nyc slut who hangs out at bars trying to get bankers to buy drinks for her.

    idk just my opinion. and drinking shitty tasting beer and alcoholic drinks isnt really exciting to me.

    i guess thats why only some bankers become successful in other areas after their analyst/associate stint. all of the bone headed partying ones get weeded out in translation.

    "Look, you're my best friend, so don't take this the wrong way. In twenty years, if you're still livin' here, comin' over to my house to watch the Patriots games, still workin' construction, I'll fuckin' kill you. That's not a threat, that's a fact.

  • TNA's picture

    I don't know, I would personally try and save the clubs for the weekend and just do some happy hours or local bars during the week. I literally feel like death after a night of drinking, but then again, I am not 22 anymore :(.

    I wouldn't call IP lame, he just does different things for fun. Dude rides a sports bike and enjoys the city. To each their own. After a while drinking all the time gets old also.

  • In reply to Will Hunting
    San Franciscan's picture

    poleandreel:
    Loud clubs are breeding grounds for idiots that hate their lives and jobs and try to have sex with cheap bitches so they feel better about themselves.

    San Franciscan's Writing Workshop:

    The above sentence is too wordy, it can easily be simplified by writing:

    "Loud clubs are breeding grounds for Investment Bankers."

    "If you can count your money, you don't have a billion dollars." - J. Paul Getty

  • New Yorker's picture

    haha san fran, you just made me laugh out loud.

  • In reply to TNA
    cphbravo96's picture

    Anthony .:
    ...After a while drinking all the time gets old also.

    I agree, which is why I was trying to point out that IP is an old fart, lol.

    I rarely go to clubs and don't go out often in general so oddly I fall more into IP's boat than the younger club hoppers on the forum, but I was also taking into consideration that this is someone in their first year who is looking to socialize, experience the city (night life) and hang out with some co workers in a setting that wouldn't be too awkward. Before I recently moved, I spend most of my time hanging out at a buddies house drinking cheap domestic beer, watching sports and playing bags/boards/cornhole (depending on where you are from) while listening to music and talking about old times. When we did go out, it was often to see my buddies band play at a local pub, nothing outrageous. However, I realize I am a bit older than most on the site and remember what I thought was fun when I was younger and looking back, yeah, I could have saved a shit ton of money by not going out, etc...but I didn't and I don't regret it at all.

    I think IP's frugal approach is good to a point but it is hard to justify not spending an extra hundred dollars a week to someone who can (theoretically) make up the difference by retiring at 36 instead of 35.

    Regards

    "The trouble with our liberal friends is not that they're ignorant, it's just that they know so much that isn't so."
    - Ronald Reagan

  • In reply to abacab
    LBT's picture

    abacab:
    Save $100 a week, 50 weeks a year, $5000 a year. 5% average gain, 10 years down the road you will end up with about $66K when you retire at age 35. Not sure if I'd plan on living in Hawaii for next 50 years of my life with that kind of savings (I understand that you will have other sources of income).

    why not split the difference and go out every other week?

  • In reply to IlliniProgrammer
    lucasblane's picture

    IlliniProgrammer:
    If you are renting an apartment in Manhattan your first year, you're essentially living hand-to-mouth on an analyst salary before you even go out clubbing. If you willingly go into credit card debt on $8 drinks and $30 covers (or worse, $1500 bottle service), you may not be as shrewd of a financier as you think.

    I recommend a trip to Fairway and picking up a 6-pack of Hofbrau or Yuengling and inviting friends over for poker and board games for your first year instead. That's what we did three years ago. You may just decide to make a habit of it. When you're retired at the age of 35, you can keep calling your friends up for board games- you'll just have to be careful about not kicking too much sand on the Settlers of Katan board while you sit on the beach in Hawaii. Meanwhile, your friends who went clubbing at 22 in New York will still be working- and still going out every evening- and will be incredibly jealous of folks whose work every day constitutes rigging either a hang glider or a katamaran.

    Monopoly with real money...

    Who's in?

  • finalfantasy's picture

    Can someone tell me why illiprogramer is still here? He's old as hell and has an IQ that is close to mental retardation that he is proud of.

    He went to a crap state school, and was a back office IT guy who got fired from a capital markets job which is pretty much the easiest job in the world given all you do is relay info on the markets and push paper plus emails around.

    oh and he thinks state schools honor program = harvard+wharton quality and he thinks saving 50 bucks a week is enough to retire to hawaii in 10 years. can we get rid of this guy yet or what.

    finally, he trolls constantly for the midwest which is pretty much the absolute worst place to live in america and is a straight up deadzone of cold barren wasteland. detroit anyone?

    oh did i mention he has no life and posts here constantly? he's like that old 40 year old guy on collegeconfidential that went to umich and constantly argues with 16-18 year old kids in high school about why his college is just as good as the ivies. just pathetic.

  • TNA's picture

    Says the kid who picked "Final Fantasy" as his screen name LOL.

    IP is not old as shit.

    IP is working at a legit job at a legit bank

    He went to one of the top state schools for engineering. Just because you went to Yale and studied womens history doesn't make you special or smart. No one is debating whether Ivy league schools are great or not. What IP does and does well, IMO, is stand up for the competency of people who go to very large state schools.

    IP is one of the most helpful posters on this site and offers a very mature and adult perspective. I find it rare considering that a large subsection of the kids on this site should be in diapers with the way they act.

    50 bucks a week might not let your retire in Hawaii in 10 years, but it sure as hell will help your 401(k) out. He might be frugal, but you would think people on this site would be extolling some sort of frugality after living through one of the worst recessions in recent history. Illini might sounds like a stick in the mud now, but when you lose your banking job and have no income you will think he is a genius.

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  • happypantsmcgee's picture

    If I had asked people what they wanted, they would have said faster horses - Henry Ford

  • In reply to TNA
    cphbravo96's picture

    "The trouble with our liberal friends is not that they're ignorant, it's just that they know so much that isn't so."
    - Ronald Reagan

  • IlliniProgrammer's picture