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I'm looking into a Private Banking Analyst position at J.P. Morgan. I'm a senior at a semi-target, and I've worked in PWM before.

I'm curious to know:

-How does private banking differ from general wealth management (besides just the pure dollar amount needed to be a client)?

- How actually "analytical" would an analyst position in private banking be? Would I be "supporting" higher-ups or selling more often than managing asset allocation, running performance reviews, and generally staring at Excel?

- Would this be a good transferable position into other areas of asset management (i.e. portfolio management, hedge funds, institutional fund/mutual fund management)?

Thanks

Comments (13)

  • In reply to FutureBanker09
    Frieds's picture

    FutureBanker09 wrote:
    1) Doesn't differ at all besides investment options
    2) Not analytical at all
    3) No you never see someone from PB go to portfolio management, you could work at as a salesman for an AM shop but definitely not as a PM. If that's your goal you'd have to start in IB or ER.

    Lets see Future Banker, you're wrong on all three accounts. To be honest, here's how it goes:

    1) It allows you to better serve your client's needs. It all depends on your client's needs and the shop you are at.

    2) The answer is that it depends on the structure of your account and clients. I know people in PWM that have a high degree of analytical basis and I know others that have no need as their basis is managed money. That said, it all depends on your client base. As to the second part, it depends on who you work for. That's the straight up truth.

    3) The answer is an astounding yes, however, it is a yes with a caveat. That caveat is pretty simple... either you work for a team that directly manages their own discretionary money or not. If you work for a group that has a discretionary account base, you can segue into being a PM more readily than you would expect, especially if you can site performance.

    Hope that helps.

  • Quarterlife's picture

    Plus a random questions, I notice that in Asia most private bankers are girls? Is that the same in the US/UK?

    My formula for success is rise early, work late and strike oil - JP Getty

  • In reply to Frieds
    Bankn's picture

    Frieds][quote=FutureBanker09 wrote:

    3) The answer is an astounding yes, however, it is a yes with a caveat. That caveat is pretty simple... either you work for a team that directly manages their own discretionary money or not. If you work for a group that has a discretionary account base, you can segue into being a PM more readily than you would expect, especially if you can site performance.

    Hope that helps.

    Thanks for that... Are you referring to discretionary money as in the client fully entrust to the firm to invest as they like as opposed to needing to send out investment suggestions?

    Is the PM of funds of funds much different than PM of individual securities?

  • Frieds's picture

    Discretionary is a term used to discuss who has the ability to make the investment decisions. In Asset Management, if you give your money to a financial advisor/hedge fund/private equity fund/etc., unless you explicitly give that person the authority to invest in a manor they see fit, you are the ultimate person in charge of what happens in your account. This is why, when you invest in PE and Hedge Funds, you agree to give away any authority to invest - it's written into the subscription documents.

    To further illustrate... You have 10MM in your account with a broker at say... UBS. He has an idea that he thinks is a good play. Unless you have that money in an account that he has agreed to take a direct fiduciary responsibility in managing it, he would need to call you and discuss the idea with you. However, if you agreed to let him manage the account, he could buy and sell as he wants. You traditionally see this when you have brokers that have specific strategies that they use (ie. Uncovered S&P Options trading strategy, Custom EM Portfolios, I know a guy with a Volatility management strategy that he uses for clients with extremely concentrated positions, etc.).

    Hope that clears things up.

  • In reply to Frieds
    Bankn's picture

    Frieds wrote:
    Discretionary is a term used to discuss who has the ability to make the investment decisions. In Asset Management, if you give your money to a financial advisor/hedge fund/private equity fund/etc., unless you explicitly give that person the authority to invest in a manor they see fit, you are the ultimate person in charge of what happens in your account. This is why, when you invest in PE and Hedge Funds, you agree to give away any authority to invest - it's written into the subscription documents.

    To further illustrate... You have 10MM in your account with a broker at say... UBS. He has an idea that he thinks is a good play. Unless you have that money in an account that he has agreed to take a direct fiduciary responsibility in managing it, he would need to call you and discuss the idea with you. However, if you agreed to let him manage the account, he could buy and sell as he wants. You traditionally see this when you have brokers that have specific strategies that they use (ie. Uncovered S&P Options trading strategy, Custom EM Portfolios, I know a guy with a Volatility management strategy that he uses for clients with extremely concentrated positions, etc.).

    Hope that clears things up.

    Thanks.