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I ran a quick search and didn't seem to find any great discussions regarding things you wish you knew to make it through the first few months of an FT IB position without asking continuous questions that may seem stupid or annoying to the more senior analysts associates. Specifically, if you could create a few page "cheat sheet" to keep in a desk drawer, what exactly would it include?

Thanks for the input!

Comments (11)

  • In reply to anonymousman
    Banker88's picture

    rodneymullen wrote:
    From my internship, I learnt to keep your head down on a Friday and look busier than the monkey next to you - otherwise your staffer will drop sh*t on your weekend

    It seems that many people recommend behavior to avoid getting staffed. But as an Analyst isn't your goal to get the best deal experience so you can recruit to the buyside and make top bonus?

  • In reply to Banker88
    BespokeAnalyst2010's picture

    Banker88 wrote:
    rodneymullen wrote:
    From my internship, I learnt to keep your head down on a Friday and look busier than the monkey next to you - otherwise your staffer will drop sh*t on your weekend

    It seems that many people recommend behavior to avoid getting staffed. But as an Analyst isn't your goal to get the best deal experience so you can recruit to the buyside and make top bonus?

    getting staffed on a lot of deals =/= top bucket. this could actually backfire you.

    remember: quality, not quantity. obviously, you can't possibly be staffed on 1 deal at a time and expect top bonus...you learn to balance.

    --------------------------------------------------
    "Whenever I'm about to do something, I think, 'Would an idiot do that?' And if they would, I do NOT do that thing."
    -Dwight Schrute, "The Office"-

  • PaperTrail's picture

    BigSwap's list is a solid start.

    I would reiterate writing down questions, wait until you have a decent list, and then approach someone more senior on your team when they have 20 minutes and fire away. Not only does this show them you want to be respectful of their time and interfere as little as possible, but overall I think you gain more from the discussion when its not just a quick 30 second Q and A.

    Also, do everything possible not to ask the same question twice. It most likely will happen, but definitely do not make it a habit. Similarly however, don't say you understand if you don't. There's a fine line here, as sometimes it works where you just need a few minutes to digest it on your own and not look like an idiot in front of your MD, but if you act like you understand and really don't have a clue then its going to embarass you later.

    One other important thing - while obviously it blows to get stuck doing something all night, on the weekends, etc., do not show anything except appreciation when this happens, esp. early on in your career. Going into banking, you expect this so it should not be a shock. Initial impressions go a long way, so have a positive attitude and plow hrough it. 2 am can be the best time to really understand what youre doing because there will be less e-mail interruptions and side conversations to distract you.