• Sharebar

As i noticed that many top US universities do not offer master degree in Finance, instead, they have plenty of PhD or MBA. Is there a ranking for Master of Finance (MSF/MFin) NOT financial engineer or quantitative finance...
So far i know good schools like Princeton and some UK schools (LSE, LBS, Ox, Cam)and some 2nd tier schools (BC, Rochester, Vanderbilt, Florida, Imperial, UCL...) offer such program, which schools offer better programs? how's the quality of those programs offered by 2nd tier schools compared with 1st tier (Princeton, LSE...)ones'
I know the job market is awful, but just wanna know how do industry/professionals' view towards this kind of Master degree in Finance (MFin/MSF)? according to Prin, their grads got good job placement, how about 2nd tier school students? still have a shot to land a good job?

All ideas appreciated, thanks!

Comments (30)

  • ReadLine's picture

    Princeton is actually pretty quantitative. it's meant as a general finance degree but I'm not sure you could really avoid taking any quantiative courses. Look at their students resumes- all quantiative backgrounds (meaning at least multivar calc, linear algebra and basic prob/stat).

    Also, as someone pointed out earlier, past placement pre-recession might not be a good indicator of current prospects.

    Florida is more like fourth-tier. replace that with johns hopkins program.

  • anilag's picture

    thanks Philosopher,
    i'm not saying definitely avoid quantitative courses, as an ex-engineering student, maths is not very hard for me (calculus, maths I,II, prob/stat, pde, lin alg, regression method...). Just because i wanna learn more about general finance rather than programming/modeling again(i did programming before, but not interest in). I understand that many maths/computing subjects in MSF/Mfin, i just really wanna know those good master programs of general finance study.

  • bluechimp's picture

    To be honest, I think the distinction between MFin and MFE (financial engineering) is getting really blurry these days. Modern finance theory builds itself upon a lot of rigorous mathematics, and you're bound to see some of it one way or the other. I mean, how do you even define 'general finance'?

    If you're looking for a general introduction to business, I think MBA is still the way to go.

  • bcbunker1's picture

    im currently a student in princeton's mfin.

    the core curriculum is fairly quantitative though not too bad- 2 courses on investments/corp finance, 2 courses on statistical methods, and 2 classes on financial economics (asset pricing). i think you can get by with just a background of linear algebra and probability. from there you can choose electives to your liking. i majored in econ and minored in math and have done fine.

    other programs like princeton in the us are MIT, vanderbilt, BU, and JHU.

    most students arent looking for quant roles though there are certainly a few. i think most people decided to come here because they wanted to focus solely on finance and are comfortable approaching things from a quantitative angle.

    the program has had 100% placement every year in its existence. I would expect similar results this year while most programs are struggling (I know CMU has only placed around 50%).

    i should warn you the program is extremely competitive to get in- 7% admission last year and 4% this year.

  • In reply to bcbunker1
    WegmansTuna's picture

    bcbunker1 wrote:
    im currently a student in princeton's mfin.

    the core curriculum is fairly quantitative though not too bad- 2 courses on investments/corp finance, 2 courses on statistical methods, and 2 classes on financial economics (asset pricing). i think you can get by with just a background of linear algebra and probability. from there you can choose electives to your liking. i majored in econ and minored in math and have done fine.

    other programs like princeton in the us are MIT, vanderbilt, BU, and JHU.

    most students arent looking for quant roles though there are certainly a few. i think most people decided to come here because they wanted to focus solely on finance and are comfortable approaching things from a quantitative angle.

    the program has had 100% placement every year in its existence. I would expect similar results this year while most programs are struggling (I know CMU has only placed around 50%).

    i should warn you the program is extremely competitive to get in- 7% admission last year and 4% this year.

    bcbunker1, just curious what are your credentials? Thinking about the Mfin program at Princeton and I want to see the 'typical' stats required to get in.....

  • dreamtheater's picture

    Princeton's Mfin is one of the most competitive..bcbunker1,I am also curious as to what are ur credentials..do you have a lot of finance or quant experience.?

  • bcbunker1's picture

    tough to give average stats because a lot of the students are not from america. but i would say this:

    3.8+ from top university
    800 quantitative GRE score
    2-3 years work experience (though some have just a couple internships)
    top grades in quantitative classes
    half have graduate degrees already

  • In reply to bcbunker1
    WegmansTuna's picture

    bcbunker1 wrote:
    tough to give average stats because a lot of the students are not from america. but i would say this:

    3.8+ from top university
    800 quantitative GRE score
    2-3 years work experience (though some have just a couple internships)
    top grades in quantitative classes
    half have graduate degrees already

    Damn....Is it the case that most Mfin programs require significant work experience before entering? Or is Princeton's the exception?

    I was under the impression that most ppl go directly from undergrad into Mfin--or atleast that its more common than going directly from undergrad to MBA.

  • indian-banker's picture

    Princeton officially doesn't require work experience but of course most people do have some experience like bcbunker said. Some places require work experience like Cambridge, LBS and Boston College. Johns Hopkins MSF program isn't that great. Spoke to a career counselor at the program and apparently the placements aren't as top notch as I expected them to be. They do place well with Booz though. The placements are perhaps a little better than programs at Florida, Illinois etc. I've done quite a bit of research on M.fin programs and you have to be at a really good school in addition to being very good at networking to land a good spot. A major reason for that is because most of the positions you will be recruited for are FT positions of which there are very few to begin with. You really can't do SA stints through your MSF program (if you are applying to a different school, and not the program at the school you currently in) for two reasons; 1) it's too late to apply through the program since you won't find out about acceptance until Feb/March, 2) some schools start in the summer. In the good days, when there were more FT positions available, it was a lot easier to get in through MSF programs. Now it's getting more difficult. That said, it will buy you time, and hopefully markets will recover enough to open up more FT spots. For those interested in less quant based finance programs, the UK schools are a better choice, since you might pursue something like a Masters in Financial Economics. It's best however, if you are deciding on such a program to do some math courses, at least up to multivariate calculus or Linear Algebra and some basic stats courses.

  • In reply to indian-banker
    WegmansTuna's picture

    indian-banker wrote:
    I just looked at the Princeton MSF resume book and some of these guys have a lot of work experience. I saw some candidates with MBAs and Phds as well. Some of the guys were even MDs/Assoc. Directors with BB banks. Pretty impressive.

    Yeah, I've noticed this too.

    Why in the world would you get a master's if you already have an MBA, a phd, or in some cases, another master's. This makes little sense to me.

  • flavito's picture

    Hi everybody !
    I m looking for a good MSF which is not a Financial Engineering program but still with a good level.
    I have problems finding rankings on this because most of the top ones are Financial Engineering and as I m not a Math BA or an Engineer my Mathematical background wont be good enough...

    Here is my profile:
    3.7 GPA BA in Finance
    1 year full time experience with a big Investment Bank
    710 gmat
    good records on portfolio management

    I m gonna apply for sure to Princeton but seeing their acceptance rate, I d rather have some other options...

    Hope you could help me:-)

  • roar19's picture

    another school that has a MSF in 1 year following undergrad...not a bad name either...

    Smokey, this is not 'Nam, this is bowling. There are rules.