Most intriguing non-finance job

mfog's picture
Rank: Senior Monkey | banana points 94

What jobs intrigue you most outside of core finance posts? Feel free to list things tangentially related to finance. I'm thinking roles from an expert testimony economist to a product manager at Apple to a fiction author.

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Comments (55)

Aug 23, 2018
mfog:

What jobs intrigue you most outside of core finance posts?

https://slideplayer.com/25/7746106/big_thumb.jpg

"If you always put limits on everything you do, physical or anything else, it will spread into your work and into your life. There are no limits. There are only plateaus, and you must not stay there, you must go beyond them." - Bruce Lee

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Aug 23, 2018
Isaiah_53_5:
mfog:

What jobs intrigue you most outside of core finance posts?

https://slideplayer.com/25/7746106/big_thumb.jpg

Good friend of mine went 75th to Tier 1 (although hasn't confirmed it) - so fucking jealous. Doesn't
help nearly 6 of my friends have gone SF.

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Most Helpful
Aug 23, 2018
Link_REDev:
Isaiah_53_5:
mfog:

What jobs intrigue you most outside of core finance posts?

https://slideplayer.com/25/7746106/big_thumb.jpg

Good friend of mine went 75th to Tier 1 (although hasn't confirmed it) - so fucking jealous. Doesn't
help nearly 6 of my friends have gone SF.

That's awesome. Its cool you know the terminology. The general public wouldn't recognize Tier 1/2 assets, but just "SEALs", etc.

That's all I wanted to do when I was 18 ... to become a Tier 1 asset. I researched each program and felt CCT was the best. They trained Tier 2 assets and had a Tier 1 group, the '24'. The training pipeline is the most extensive for CCT/PJs and it looked really cool. One of my instructors was a Tier 1 asset. His nickname was "The Machine".

I was a real gaudy mofo in the program. I paid for it and usually had to do extra PT for my jokes or antics. I never did them if they would impact my team (like make them do PT), only if it could fall straight on me. Sometimes my team lead did get shit for it and he would get pissed at me. He was a hardass former Marine DI (http://www.veterantributes.org/TributeDetail.php?r...) - he's a good guy though I mean, he just got on me about all kinds of shit. One thing that he got mad about was we had to stencil our names on our brown shirts, but we had like these shirts everywhere, just stuffed in drawers and in non inspectable locked places if we needed one quick.

So one day we changed uniforms (we were changing all the time - they just fucked with us - they'd put us in Blues and we would do pushups and workout in blues or something). I had a fresh brown shirt, but in my haste stenciling half dead/asleep, I actually left out a letter on my name. I could have grabbed a dirty shirt (which is fine sometimes as they just throw us in the mud again), but did a quick stencil with an arrow on the shirt and the letter missing. hahahaha. Then stood in line for inspection. Man, my instructor lost his shit. He was laughing so hard. He wasn't even mad. I thought I was going to get more crap for that, but he thought it was so funny, that I could wear that shirt around if I wanted to without paying for it/PT/infraction. But, my team lead wasn't thrilled.

It became an ongoing joke though. When we started the first official course, we had to do these leadership teamwork training exercises. Like solve puzzles and stand on each other to cross a point or something. We had this USAFA grad who was leading (he was a trainee too - water polo guy). He would read the instructions and proceed with a plan. I was an E1 so generally didn't say shit. He was a butter bar (O1), but the ranking guy. We passed a few of the trials to our instructors approval (they were just standing, observing) and hit an impasse and were just sitting there for 20min or something to the point that we had to to PT for not doing it fast enough. I finally thought I solved it so said the plan to the LT so we could get out of the exercise/pushup position and it worked. We hit another roadblock on the next one and he just turns to me and was like "what do you think, 'Brainiac". lolol. Then that nickname stuck hard through the rest of the training program. The instructors started calling me that too and when we went TDY to the next phase, my new instructors would say that when I did very intelligent or very stupid/odd shit.

I didn't make the program though. I failed a test in Air Traffic Control school and was told I had to wait another 2 years to try out again. I never quit though. I went straight to military school and then to finance after that.

I ran into a Tier 1 asset last year at my gym (this guy https://www.keesler.af.mil/News/Article-Display/Ar...). I was on the heavy bag and it was going everywhere, and he just came up and started holding it. Never met the guy. He looked like a marine to me. Nice dude.

But, I said 'oh are you in the Marines or something'? He said "no, Air Force." I was like - "oh yeah, CCT right?". He was like, "yeah out of Pope." I said "oh ok nice, you're in the 2-4". He was like "yeah, who are you???". I went into the service right after him (8 months) and we knew a lot of the same people. Our instructors during that phase and also people who were trainees who he served with on deployments. But, its interesting, he said to me - overall, he wished he gone the route I did - to get a degree and then into finance.

I brushed that off and was like no - your stuff is so badass though. But, he told me a lot of the work in the higher ranks is just research/mission planning/PPT slides to brief and stuff like that. I think he misses being an E4/E5 on the field. All roles on the enlisted side or officer side eventually come to a desk. Because much like finance, they are valuable assets at risk. You're not going to put an O7 in harms way and usually by O5, time on the field is limited (my brother was still doing jumps with his SEAL team at O6, but just training exercises). Which is why it is so bat shit crazy when Stan McChrystal (O10) is jumping in foxholes next to bullet catchers (infantry). I think that Rolling Stone article back in the day captured this well - some infantry dude looked to his left and said "its fucking Stan McChrystal!!". haha

We had a lot of Tier 2 assets come directly into our program though. We had a force recon guy, Navy SEAL, Army Ranger - and some other competitive programs like we had a Navy Search and Rescue swimmer. All these people transferred to the USAF for the program. Most lost stripes to switch services. The Search and Rescue swimmer was a Navy Reserve E7 and they changed his rank to USAF Active E4. Fuck. He bitched about that at least once a week. He's say - "Sooo I'm not even an NCO in this branch of the military...fucking bullshit." lol. Also, do you know how odd it is do see the SEAL trident on USAF BDUs or even more odd, USAF blues --- its soooo weird looking. Also, its odd to be rolling around in the mud with a rucksack or something and then stand up to see your fellow trainee with a SEAL trident already on his uniform. Is like... ummm ok... training again? I think he got out of the SEALs, then wanted back in, but decided to go through this program for some of the training (HALO school, Army Combat Diver). He was 30 and slightly out of shape (like in really good shape, but not really really good shape). So when we were assigned to do a meeelion pullups until our hands started bleeding, he would say "but, I'm 30, I'm not young like you guys". I think the Army Ranger was the same age, but was a beast and defied the laws of nature, so he'd just glare at him in these moments. The mix of people in training is pretty funny actually.

That schoolhouse in the first phase of training was like a freaking Church though. You respected it so much and in the heart of the schoolhouse, like the blessed sacrament, is the sacrifices that others have made for the country. There is a room with AF Crosses, just lined on each side by CCT/PJs, their name, act a description of the act of valor. How inspiring. This is the room where when the PJs finish Indoc, they get their ascots (sounds weird, but is really badass). It used to be a joint Indoc, but they split it up.

But, every time you leave the schoolhouse, you hit a sign and say "Hooyah Never Quit". I was thinking about this today and in relation to the Jocko thread and his inspiration to many. The mentality of saying "Never Quit" is quite large. I think a USMC saying is "Failure is not an option." In life, we think of the many excuses of why not to do something, after we have already set on the path to do it. The Never Quit mantra exposes two things about a mission or task or journey in everyday life: a) Do not start things you are not going to finish b) Do not quit something you have set to finish.

Obviously, there are extenuating circumstances, but to have the mindset is to set yourself up for success. Also, these guys are an employers/MBA schools dream. They make things happen.

"If you always put limits on everything you do, physical or anything else, it will spread into your work and into your life. There are no limits. There are only plateaus, and you must not stay there, you must go beyond them." - Bruce Lee

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Aug 23, 2018

Getting into a Tier 1 group is insanely difficult. I would say about 5% of the people I know made it through selection.

Aug 23, 2018
Ohdavey:

Getting into a Tier 1 group is insanely difficult. I would say about 5% of the people I know made it through selection.

5% of the people you know?

Who exactly do you know - :)

"If you always put limits on everything you do, physical or anything else, it will spread into your work and into your life. There are no limits. There are only plateaus, and you must not stay there, you must go beyond them." - Bruce Lee

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Aug 23, 2018

I grew up in Savannah (home of the 1/75 and 160th), so I have quite a few family members and friends in these units and others a few states north and south.

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Aug 23, 2018
Ohdavey:

I grew up in Savannah (home of the 1/75 and 160th), so I have quite a few family members and friends in these units and others a few states north and south.

Nice.

I talked to that dude at the gym about making Tier 1 and he brushed it off as not too bad. I called bullshit on him, but for him it really wasn't too bad (he looked like a beast though). You just don't come across too many Tier 1 guys. Either you do and don't know it (or they don't say it) or they are just not in most people's circles outside of the JSOC and SOCOM cities.

Part of it for him was timing. He was an instructor and said he could train all the time, whereas some of his peers just came back from deployments (I think the timing was very close) and they were a bit broken down.

But, the true badass doesn't need timing on his side, right? Just take down some mofos in the middle east, live in harsh conditions, eat nothing, then come back and just slaughter Tier 1 quals.... its really the only way.

"If you always put limits on everything you do, physical or anything else, it will spread into your work and into your life. There are no limits. There are only plateaus, and you must not stay there, you must go beyond them." - Bruce Lee

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Aug 23, 2018

I only meant to type like four lines. Damn. Oh well. I realized I just threw out a lot of jargon and stuff, but in general, that stunt with the shirt was so ridiculous that I really could have fucked my whole team hard. A lot of them are seasoned combat vets now and probably will never forget that T-Shirt incident. You just don't do certain things in those programs and somehow I was able to pull off a lot of stuff, just to make things interesting.

I actually think I was ordered to bring that shirt to my TDY at Keesler. The instructors heard about it and wanted to see this guy. I thought damn, I'm in the green on this one - I even made another one with cooler lettering.

I felt so much in the green that on Christmas break, I sent the Tier 1 asset from the program I just finished a Christmas Card (snail mail) with some gaudy shit in it. He said "I thought you sent me Anthrax." - lolol what? It was funny though, that was an ongoing joke as well.

https://media0.giphy.com/media/MccXoMrOhrpRe/giphy.gif

"If you always put limits on everything you do, physical or anything else, it will spread into your work and into your life. There are no limits. There are only plateaus, and you must not stay there, you must go beyond them." - Bruce Lee

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Funniest
Aug 23, 2018

See now, this whole time I thought you were referring to Tier 1 capital and was extremely confused about what kind of bank you were working at.

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Aug 24, 2018

loved reading this, please post more about your experiences. all of the SBs.

as for the original question

most intriguing and low key - surf travel blogger/freesurfer

most likely and still intriguing - Navy (would try for SEALs, but I'm not arrogant enough to say I'd make it, I just grew up with a couple guys in the teams and a military career has always fascinated me)

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Aug 24, 2018

Agree with your last comment. I was always interested in the Marine Recon -> MARSOC (now called Marine Raiders) route. One of my close childhood friends is going to BUD/S pretty soon. Another friend of mine is considering it as well.

Aug 30, 2018

I'm prior military (in a combat unit and trained with special forces units a couple times) and had literally never heard the the terms "tier 1" or "tier 2" asset before reading this. I had to google it. Not sure if I just completely missed something or these terms aren't commonly used IRL? Genuinely curious...

Aug 30, 2018
Personofwalmart:

I'm prior military (in a combat unit and trained with special forces units a couple times) and had literally never heard the the terms "tier 1" or "tier 2" asset before reading this. I had to google it. Not sure if I just completely missed something or these terms aren't commonly used IRL? Genuinely curious...

If you want to join an organization, you learn everything about the organization. I found out maybe 1 week into training. We were absolutely obsessed. We talked about the career paths and places we might go to combat all the time. Its just a DoD term though, you know what the entities are and what they do, which is more important.

But, from a DoD perspective, I think one has to realize what we are dealing with. A Tier 1 asset is much more valuable than a Tier 2 asset. Some military organizations track their personnel by an exact dollar figure. In fact, when I went to Air Traffic Control school at Keesler AFB, we had a seminar that said "Don't drink and drive because you're worth $400,000 to the USAF." They did some computation that said the cost of all the lost candidates before joining the military, the cost of marketing, recruiting, and time, training, and materials invested, that's what it comes to. That was for a normal ATC student. CCT candidates were probably twice that.

So the million dollar man is ... well probably the Tier 2 asset. Those Tier 1 guys are so rare it probably takes tens of millions if not more to get to that level of technical expertise and training, not to mention support for these 'assets' aka resources if they get into trouble. The cost of sending in people to get them out of a place they are not supposed to be ... is phenomenal. Usually doesn't happen and they get out, but it does happen at times. So this is an ongoing consideration of the DoD; if they are willing to do X for a Tier 1 guy or Y for Tier 2.

Some Generals/Admirals say they don't look at that stuff, but I think its different to base your decision on the numbers and profitability of people, versus weighing the options and making a reasonable choice to benefit the overall good of the country, which is always a hard decision that many leaders have made and suffer restless nights.

The world is not easy, my friend, but we must remember one thing. 'Si vis pacem, para bellum.'

"If you want peace, get ready for war."

-Publius Flavius Vegetius Renatus

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/a0/Casino_Militar_%28Madrid%29_02.jpg/330px-Casino_Militar_%28Madrid%29_02.jpg

"If you always put limits on everything you do, physical or anything else, it will spread into your work and into your life. There are no limits. There are only plateaus, and you must not stay there, you must go beyond them." - Bruce Lee

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Aug 24, 2018

I respect that a lot, wanted to be Recon when I was 18... but dude, as a mere grunt, that life can suck lol. Just makes me think of getting rained on. Takes a special breed for sure.

Personally I'd want to be a Theo Epstein for one of my favorite teams.

Aug 24, 2018

Interesting to see how many other people on this forum considered that route. When I was 18 and in high school I met with a Marine recruiter and almost signed the paperwork. But he did not have any available slots for the UZ contract (this contract is specifically for enlisted Marines to go straight from SOI (School of Infantry) to BRC (Basic Reconnaissance Course). I always wonder how different my life would be if he had that contract available that day...

Aug 28, 2018

Good stuff. Yeah it only took me getting a long term gf to decide against recon lol. But I'm not a huge fan of the war I was part of so I'm glad you're doing RE.

Aug 30, 2018

Yeah, I used to love watching Generatiom Kill. But now that I've grown up by 4 years, it makes me realize how sad a lot of the stuff is. Makes me realize how upsetting it would be to see needless civilian casualties because of the incompetence of other offices (Captain America, if you're familiar with the series).

Aug 30, 2018

before I knew what the stock market was, I visited every academy expo I could get my parents to take me to, talked to officers, even asked my dad if he knew any congressmen who could get me into annapolis.

if life had turned out a different way, maybe I'd be captain brofessor, who knows

Aug 30, 2018

Wow, I went to the Naval Academy meetings and everything myself. I never got the congressional nomination. I even got rejected by NROTC. Marines and Navy go through the same academy/ ROTC. My high school GPA (3.5) wasn't good enough for either of those. But hey, I've found something else I like to do. As it seems you have as well.

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Aug 23, 2018

Working in entertainment. Who doesn't want to be Ari Gold?

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Aug 24, 2018

The real life inspiration to Ari Gold, named Ari Emanuel, does very well for himself. Although he isn't as extreme as Ari Gold, he does have a reputation for his temper.

Aug 24, 2018

agree

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Aug 23, 2018

Architect or engineer in the oil industry. Both high-paying, intellectually challenging jobs.

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Aug 24, 2018

How challenging can it be? All you gotta do is put a fat chick in high heels and you'll strike oil.

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Aug 24, 2018

I agree with you. I'm on the financial side of the OG. I got my MBA recently, and realized I should have just gotten a Mech. E degree as a second major instead. I'm in the process of correcting that mistake. So many great/interesting opportunities.

Aug 30, 2018

Architecture is really cool. I know two people who went the Architecture -> RE Development route. They do extremely well for themselves.

Aug 23, 2018

Aerospace engineer or surgeon

Aug 23, 2018

It's a tie for me between a special military role like HALO jumping, SEAL, Army Ranger, and the like versus being an assassin. If you figure the world out well enough, I think it can be incredibly easy to be a criminal. The only downside is that society employs people 24/7 to run you down, so the trick is to balance your risk/reward in criminal enterprise. Don't be Pablo Escobar/El Chapo, do be the guy who specializes in knocking off their rivals for millions apiece under various assumed identities while living quietly in a very foreign country.

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Aug 23, 2018

Pilot

Aug 23, 2018

Sports Agent
Sports Broadcaster/Reporter
NFL Punter
NFL Back Up QB (i.e. Chase Daniel who has made millions upon millions not really doing much)
MLB Middle Relief pitcher
Low-Profile PGA player (#110 on money list >$1mm this year)

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Aug 23, 2018

Producer (music or film, preferably music)
Director (film)
Sports Agent
History Professor
Author

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Aug 23, 2018

Law always sounded pretty interesting to me, especially corporate law.

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Aug 23, 2018

I work in Strategy and love it. Never a same day. Always moving fast, and I get to design my own role half the time. Wouldn't trade it for more money... ok, some more but it would take a lot of money to get me out of this role.

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Aug 23, 2018

Very interesting. Work with our strategy teams alot and their industry knowledge is nearly unmatched. What was your path?

Aug 23, 2018

Movie studio or TV network/Netflix exec

Aug 23, 2018

DSS Agent for the state department

MSFS Incoming Intern

Aug 23, 2018

military
gm of a sports team
sports radio
podcast

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Aug 23, 2018

how could I forget GM!

Aug 23, 2018

I imagine being a neurosurgeon (or any other type of surgeon) is pretty fuckin neat. I wanted to do that until I got a B- in Bio and dropped Chem freshman year lol.

Another that comes to mind is military. Especially Special Forces. Being the literal fist of American might must be cool, along with the brotherhood aspect and the fact that you are standing for something immensely greater than yourself.

Also intelligence agencies are cool, i.e. CIA, NSA, ISA, and others.

Aug 23, 2018

Same thing with me lol. Started out as pre-med, found out I'm bad at Anatomy and switched to Political Science immediately

Aug 23, 2018

Lowkey fuck premed haha. Had enough of that shit after one semester

Aug 23, 2018

I've always been a big sports guy. Aside from playing in the NFL I think coaching would be awesome. Whether at the collegiate level or NFL.

I almost pursued this path and spent a year interning with my school. It sucks though because you spend two years as a graduate assisant getting a measly monthly stipend (school is free, so is food) and IF you do a good job then you take the first position you can and try to win. The hours these guys are working are pretty crazy...Usually around 80-90+ in season and around 50ish in the offseason (not counting travelling for recruiting).Everything is all about connections. But for those first five years you are broke, and basically the low man on the totem poll.

Main things that deterred me were not wanting to be broke for the next five years, and not to mention if you don't get on with a winning staff you are basically screwed. Watching eight hours of film a day sucks ass as well.

However the guys at schools like BAMA, Clemson, Ohio State (not putting THE first foh) etc, are living the dream. All you have to do is worry about winning in a winning culture. You are surrounded by numerous first round draft picks, and most of your fellow colleagues will go on to be head coaches for premier program. Not to mention your head coach will have an insane network for you to tap in to.

I've always had an interest in Trading (I can spend hours reading about old trading floor stories and the culture sounds like it was fun, and sucked at the same time) and entrepreneurship too.

Aug 24, 2018

Wildlife/nature and travel photographer.

Aug 24, 2018

Diplomat
Astronomer
Military (Navy or Air Force)

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Aug 24, 2018

Military for sure. I would have done it too if I didn't end up getting cripply at the end of high school. I have quite a few military friends I met through my first main co. and they have some awesome stories. Very jelly.

Aug 24, 2018

Everyone saying military on here...interesting.

My childhood dream was to be a USAF fighter pilot. Grew up near a base, so had a lot of exposure to jets flying over. Also was thinking about it with the Chicago Air Show this past weekend. I imagine that'd be such a rush flying in those machines, plus "I'm a fighter pilot" has to be one of the top 3 pickup lines.

Another childhood dream of mine was to be a video game tester, but that sounds like complete shit as an adult, unless the game is yours. Imagine getting stuck on a level and not knowing how to fix it.

As I aged, thought about personal training. Seemed to be low stress, and I like fitness.

As an adult, I envy those in military careers, even if it's just the reserves. Mad respect for those people.
I also knew someone from studying abroad who is a travel blogger, and the guy is in some new exotic place every week. Seems to be doing well for himself. I'd assume that would be amazing, but I question whether the constant traveling gets old.

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Aug 24, 2018

Professional racecar driver.

Being the Patrick Dempsey of finance is the ultimate exit-opp.

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Aug 24, 2018

Poker Player
Astronaut

Aug 26, 2018

Astronaut,...you mean space construction worker?

Aug 24, 2018

Astronaut
Air-force/Navy
Being born a Kardashian/Jenner (talk about easy work life balance)
Runway Model. I'll admit it I am a pretty cute guy
President of the United States
Entrepreneur

I am still in college so most of these options are still possibilities.

If I am ever up for election...Vote for Nick.

Aug 24, 2018

Ninja.

Aug 24, 2018

Housewife

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Aug 25, 2018
Aug 25, 2018
Aug 28, 2018