Comments (106)

Jan 29, 2012

The official GMAC tests! but use them sparingly since there are only 2

Jan 29, 2012

I thought that the math sections on the MGMAT CATs were harder than the actual thing and that the verbal sections were easier, but they seem to do a pretty good job of predicting your score

Jan 29, 2012

i used the veritas data sufficiency book. it seems like their materials are pretty solid.

Best Response
Jan 29, 2012

MGMAT should do the trick. Math section is much more difficult and time consuming than the real thing. Here is also a link to the website that has 1000 Sentence Correction problems.

http://thousandsc.blogspot.com/

    • 2
Jan 29, 2012

Agree that MGMAT is great prep for quant and significantly harder.

gmatclub.com also sells sample tests that are pretty good for practicing the more challenging quant questions

Jan 29, 2012

thanks guys

are there any brands of tests that are a good reflection of the real thing?

Jan 29, 2012
weeds499:

thanks guys

are there any brands of tests that are a good reflection of the real thing?

The old tests from mba.com are about as real as it gets.

    • 1
Jan 30, 2012

Per the comment about the GMAC exams... you can essentially re-set them and take the over and over again (you will see repeats eventually) by un-installing and re-installing the files [GMATclub.com does a nice job explaining this]

'Before you enter... be willing to pay the price'

Jan 31, 2012

Thanks for all the guidance..In fact this helped one of my friend..

Jan 31, 2012

Hi weeds499,

The GMAC tests have been mentioned several times above, and I want to mention that these exams can be found at MBA.com. These official practice tests provide great study material.

Cheers,

Conrad and the Stacy Blackman Team

Feb 1, 2012

I've heard the Manhattan tests are harder than the actual GMAT, but that the scoring is very accurate (meaning that the Manhattan tests' scoring system has been calibrated to account for the fact that they are more difficult, and therefore generate fairly accurate score predictions despite their increased difficulty relative to the actual exam).

I've heard the official practice tests from GMAC (mba.com) are easier than the actual exam for quant, and are fairly representative for verbal. Of course, it is hard to determine to what extent people's test-day nervousness plays a role when they evaluate the relative difficulty of the tests.

I've taken several Manhattan tests and both official practice tests (my actual GMAT is coming up before too long). My highest score on the Manhattan tests is lower than my lowest score on the official practice tests (though not by a wide margin). So we'll see what happens on test day.

For quant specifically, my sense is the quant on the Manhattan tests is just very time consuming. I have difficulty finishing the Manhattan quant sections on time without "educated guessing" a few questions to save time. However, I've had no problem finishing the two official GMAC practice tests' quant sections on time.

For verbal specifically, my sense is the Manhattan tests are very similar to the official GMAC tests. However, Manhattan seems to have more ambiguous answer choices in the more difficult questions than the GMAC tests. In other words, at the harder levels, Manhattan seems to make the questions harder by using more ambiguous answer choices, where more than one can be correct, and you have to choose the "best" one. Conversely, GMAC seems to use more challenging language (e.g., more dense/convoluted RC passages or longer CR passages), but there are fewer instances of more than one answer choice being "right" (less ambiguity).

Finally, I will say that the GMATclub (www.gmatclub.com) quant tests are really helpful. They are really, really hard (I can never finish one on time without guessing some questions), so I wouldn't use them until you've already studied a lot for quant. However, if you're looking for something to really push your quant score up into the top tier (49, 50, 51), they are a great resource. The downside is they are not adaptive (not a huge deal, since almost every question is 700-level already) and they don't score the same way the GMAT does (they just tell you how many you got right). But definitely worth the $75 or whatever they cost if you're looking for a big quant score.

    • 1
May 17, 2013

I took practice tests from GMATPill which you can access for free --- good for 5 attempts

So free tests:

GMAT Pill (5 attempts)
Kaplan
MGMT (several)
GMAT Club

GMATPill tests were a little harder than the real test on the quant section -- but that's alright because I want to get more practice. The timing charts are extremely useful -- I can see that at the end of the exam I rush because I didn't pace myself throughout the exam. I don't think any of the other tests out there have a timing chart -- similar to the momentum shift charts you see with basketball games.

The best practice is from GMAC and those tests are called GMATPrep tests. Usually GMATPrep1 and GMATPrep 2 -- you generally want to save the 2nd one for the week before your exam. That way you have a *real* practice test before your actual test to see where you stand before going in.

Besides that seems a lot of ppl know about the MGMT tests - the GMATClub are heavy quant focused. Good exercise but just be careful -- it's not going to be that hard on the actual test.

Additional practice tests you can get from GMATPill, Knewton and Kaplan.

Jan 17, 2016

Hi guys, Just thought I'd give you the link for the free GMAT PIll Practice tests: www.gmatpill.com/GMAT-practice-test/practice-test/

  • b
  •  Jan 17, 2016

mba.com

Jan 17, 2016

You should def check out gmatclub.com during your GMAT preparation

Jan 17, 2016

You can get a free one from kaplan and two from teh mba.com site

Jan 17, 2016

Try these tests:
GMAT Pill
GMAT Club
Kaplan
MGMT

Jan 17, 2016

You only get the correct answers; no explanations. The MBA.com tests are the most accurate predictor of the actual exam as far as content, format and generally scoring (at least relative to tests from Pton Review, Manh GMAT, etc.).

Generally, they reco that you save those two exams for last but i found it helpful to take the tests, reset the software, and then take again. A bunch of repeated information but helps with practice and confidence.

Jan 17, 2016

And even if you take them at the start of your GMAT prep, after 2 to 3 months of studying and practice problems, you will likely have forgotten the repeat problems anyway. Everything will seem new and fresh, but you'll be better trained to tackle the exam. Bottom line: they're still super accurate indicators of your performance if you retake them at the end of your prep cycle.

Jan 17, 2016
  • Use the search function at beatthegmat.com and gmatclub.com... they're great for finding extra explanations for OG and GMAT Prep questions.
  • Search for a thread on gmatclub.com that tells you how to reinstall GMAT Prep properly so that you have a new FRESH set of questions every time you retake it, as the question bank consists of 1000+ questions... i've actually retaken it around 3 times.
  • PowerPrep is the old GMAT Prep and has overlap with the OG 10, 11, 12 material, but they have step-by-step explanations
Jan 17, 2016

From my experience,

the MBA.com practice tests are EXACTLY like the actual GMAT, both in terms of question mix/difficulty and scoring.
The scoring is 100% accurate. For example, I took 2 MBA.com tests, got a 740 and a 760. I got a 740 on the real thing.

Also, while there are only two practice tests, I have heard that each test has a question bank of 250+ questions, so you can take each test 2-3 times before getting too many familiar questions. So really, there are 5-6 practice tests on there.

Jan 17, 2016

AA,

Do you just not save your responses and reset the test? I didn't realize you could do this.

Jan 17, 2016
Jack B.:

AA,

Do you just not save your responses and reset the test? I didn't realize you could do this.

i think all you need to do is re-install the test software

Jan 17, 2016

Are these worth taking even if you've JUST started studying for the GMAT?

Jan 17, 2016

^^^its good to gauge...im downloading mine right now... not sure ill spend three hours taking the practice test tonight though...

Jan 17, 2016

^^
hmm I see... I just have a bitch of a schedule and wasn't sure if I should bother taking it for another month or not.

Jan 17, 2016

I found it to be the most accurate as well. After taking a few of the MGMAT practice tests, I took an "official" mba.com test the night before the real thing and got a 710, which was my actual score, and higher than I had scored on manhattan GMAT practices. The verbal on the real thing and the mba.com test was a joke compared to manhattan, but that was my strongest section.

Jan 17, 2016

^^^ are you saying manhattan GMAT verbal was more difficult than the actual test?

Jan 17, 2016

In my opinion, it was. I scored 99th% on mba.com practice and the next day on the real thing. I was closer to 90-93rd in manhattan AND cheating on the time.

Jan 17, 2016

MBA.com (GMAT PREP) = easier than real thing - particularly the quant section.

MGMAT Quant = harder than real thing
MGMAT Verbal = easier than real thing

Real GMAT Verbal has longer passages than GMAT PREP.

These are very important. I would say don't waste these tests until you feel good prepping. These tests are benchmarkers - not really for review.

Jan 17, 2016

I took the 2 practice tests the day before my GMAT and I scored in the mid 500's each time and I was freaking out. When i took the real thing the next day, I scored 690. Not the best of course but good enough to get be in to Ross.
The biggest value that I took from taking the practice test is it's just like the real thing so you get a really good feel for how the real things going to go.

Jan 17, 2016

For me they were very accurate. My real score was the average of GMATPrep 1 and GMATPrep 2, and the difference between the two was 20 points.

If you need explanations for the answers, check out gmatclub.com, they are very helpful.

Jan 17, 2016

not a great start, but given alot of quant is data sufficiency which is very difficult to do without practice with some serious training you can get it to a decent level.

On a side note theres a guy at wharton last year with 540.

Jan 17, 2016

It would be better if you bombed the verbal section--you can really train yourself to beat the verbal.

I'm not sure how much of your math score was due to rust, but surely you'll be able to bring it up substantially if you feel it belies your true aptitude.

Jan 17, 2016

thanks. sat math was 700. I honestly think I guessed on all the data sufficiency questions, had no clue how I was supposed to answer the questions.

Jan 17, 2016

You should buy some ManhattanGMAT books. They are really good. I wouldn't take the class until you finish the books and run through some practice exams.

Jan 17, 2016

also if youve forgotten all basic maths the GMAT maths pill might be quite useful, fairly price, but worth it imho if you learn better through videos than book.

  • eyelikecheese
  •  Jan 17, 2016

It depends on your diligence and ability to study. While thats below average, its not horrible, especially since you haven't studied. Get the Manhattan GMAT books, all 3 official guides, and dedicate yourself.

Jan 17, 2016

Bought MGMAT 8 strategy guides and the 3 official guides. Have the option to sign up for 9-session class as well. Do you all recommend I study before I enroll into the class? If so, how long should I study before I start taking the in-person classes? I can sign up for one starting the 10th.

Jan 17, 2016

Dude i took it with no prep at all and scored a 480

What I did after that:

Princeton Review Cracking the GMAT Book & CD
Kaplan GMAT 800
Official Guide
7 CATs from Manhattan GMAT + 2 free ones from the GMAT exam company

Score: 640

Waited 30 days, took it again with a clear head, and got a 720 with very little prep.

Jan 17, 2016

How much do people typically spend on GMAT prep? Some of the prep guides and classes seem ridiculously overpriced to me.

Jan 17, 2016
Omoba De Jonz O:

How much do people typically spend on GMAT prep? Some of the prep guides and classes seem ridiculously overpriced to me.

Depends largely on the test taker's intelligence.

I'm not the sharpest tool in the shed, so I had to put in about 5 months, which included additional time to ace the retake. I know of people who've scored 780 with very little prep.

Jan 17, 2016

I wouldn't really worry about it. If you've never seen data sufficiency questions before, you can't really expect to cruise through them. I took the GMAT Prep practice test cold before I started prepping. Took a practice test again after about a month and a half and got 30 points higher. After another month and a half I was up 80 points from my first practice test. It's all about familiarizing yourself with the types of questions, getting the pacing down for the math section, and learning shortcuts from the Manhattan GMAT strategy guides. Put in the time and you'll get there. You can't get discouraged before you even start studying.

  • eyelikecheese
  •  Jan 17, 2016

I'd say with the MGMAT prep material, you'd be able to get at least 150 point improvement, or at least that would be manageable. With a score that low(I know you didn't know anything), it just means you need to learn the foundations. MGMAT will help you with that. I'm up anywhere from 100-140 points after 2 months prep

Jan 17, 2016

I studied for a month and scored a 720 with the MGMAT books and 3 Official Guides. I would say it was a total of about 45 hours, mostly doing practice problems. The books helped a great deal and there was only one question on the actual test that I had not seen in some form before. I think you should at least skim the material before you take the actual classes, it will help you identify your weak areas ahead of time. I think my initial prep test score was in the mid 500's and I am pretty sure I could have scored higher on the actual test with a couple weeks of extra study time. That being said, if you put it the time to study, take timed practice tests, and relax on test day you should be fine.

Jan 17, 2016

It's normal that you missed that many. Was this the test/s from MBA.com?

Jan 17, 2016

yeah... it just doesn't make sense that with a 46 on quant you could still get a 750 though.... because 46 q is like 78%th percentile by most marks... granted the 48 v is above 99th... anyways... and 78 and 99.5 don't average to 98-97 (which would be implied by the 750)

anyways... the bottom line is that I should study some math. I REALLY don't remember anything about geometry...

Jan 17, 2016

and yeah it's the first of the mba.com ones.

Jan 17, 2016

Honestly, you should just go take the test with very minimal studying. If you put in a solid month you should easily score 770+. Congrats man, I'm struggling to break 700. Good luck as well.

Jan 17, 2016

i guess i could have missread it and it could have been 46 / 48 in the other direction and that would make more sense... cause 46 in v is still 99ish and 48 in math would make a big difference over 46... moves from like 78 to 85 or something i think

Jan 17, 2016

You have to remember that the GMAT is a computer adaptive test so it is going to keep giving you more difficult questions until it gets to the point that you consistently miss questions at a certain difficulty. For that reason, you could miss 15 questions, but if all the misses were "800" level questions than you could end up with a 760. At the same time, you could only miss 10 questions, but if they were all at an easier difficulty, you could end up with a 650. You shouldn't worry about HOW MANY questions you are missing - you should worry about HOW HARD are the questions you are missing. This isn't a traditional test where your score is based on the percentage you got right.

Jan 17, 2016

right, I understand that the different difficulties have different values in scoring... but it just seemed wild that one could get a 750 having missed so many questions and being barely into the top quartile on Q...

Jan 17, 2016

Verbal is where you get into the 740+range.

Jan 17, 2016

Also, you shouldn't think about 75th percentile quant and 99th verbal as 87 percentile total. It doesn't work that way. Most people who get 99th on quant totally suck at verbal (and vice versa). If you can get 99th percentile in one section, as long as you get above 50th on the other you will likely get 720+. For example, I got 99th percentile verbal and 85th quant and I was in the 99th percentile total.

Jan 17, 2016

And on the live test, I only missed 1 question in verbal and ended up with a 48. I missed 10-12 (can't remember) on quant and got 46. I think the quant section is much more competitive because of the large number of non-native english speakers (asians) who rock quantitative but bring down averages on verbal.

Jan 17, 2016

agree with GenericUserName

also, the interplay between your verbal %, quant %, and overall % is complex and often surprising. what it comes down to, as i understand it (having taken the test last summer), is that even though you may have been 80% on math and 99% on verbal, there are still less than 1% of people that get both of those simultaneously.

to illustrate, if i recall correcly, i got 98% quant, ~94% verbal, but still got 99% overall.

in terms of accuracy of the official practice tests, i found them to be spot-on - i took both practice tests and the real test within the same 2 week period, and my scores were 760 (practice 1), 780 (practice 2), 770 (real).

practice tests from other companies are pretty much a crapshoot though, i took one from knewton in that same short time period and got something like a 680

Jan 17, 2016

^that makes a lot of sense... I also got like 800w and 780v or something on sat and only 700 on m.. .so I'm just weaker on quant.

Jan 17, 2016

thanks dublin, that's encouraging...

Jan 17, 2016

just a quick question--how different is the GMAT from the SAT?

meaning how strong is the correlation between performing well on one vs. the other

Jan 17, 2016

i got 760 on both practice tests and 760 on the real one

Jan 17, 2016

but no significant prep

Jan 17, 2016

Solidarity,

The general rule of thumb is that you should score around half your SAT score (or a 3rd for all you young kids). So if you scored a 1400 on the old SAT you should expect to score a 700 on the GMAT. Obviously, this is a generalization and can be largely influenced by how much you prepare and how much weed you smoked in college.

Jan 17, 2016

^a generalization, but pretty much correct from what I'm seeing so far... from roughly 1500 to roughly 750 (if I can actually achieve that score on the live test).

Jan 17, 2016

A 750 is no doubt a fantastic score, but you still have some studying to do. I know a 48M = 82%, so I'm guessing a 46M is something in the 70-73% range. Given that the top schools expect to see at least 80% in both categories, I'd encourage you to increase your math before you go for the real thing. Your ridiculously high verbal compensates by increasing your overall score, but you still want 80+% on the math. When you go to fill out your MBA apps, you'll notice that they ask for a M/V numerical and % split.

Jan 17, 2016

^thanks for the advice compbanker - that's what I was thinking too. The good news is that I should be able to improve math substantially... there were tons of easy questions where I just needed to review (forgot the formula for volume of a cone, forgot some basic properties of polygons, etc.)... the bad news is I think you're right that in order to be competitive at the top schools I better get 85th-90th on quant. I've read a number of things that say that.

Another interesting thing now that I looked back at all the questions I missed is that almost all of them were problem solving, rather than data sufficiency. It's really just that one question type that's been an issue.... anyways.

thanks for all the comments people

Jan 17, 2016
International Pymp:

almost all of them were problem solving, rather than data sufficiency. It's really just that one question type that's been an issue.... anyways.

It's odd that you're inherently better at DS over PS, I think almost everyone is vice-versa... Did you have any trouble with number properties?

Jan 17, 2016

yeah, for me, and probably for you and many others, things like geometry sort of wear off in the ~5-6 years between learning them in high school and graduating college - i spent the first couple days of my gmat prep reading through the math review chapter in the official guide (chapter 3, perhaps?) and it made all the difference in the world. comes back to you pretty quick if you put in some hours.

Jan 17, 2016

Yeah, I skipped those initially (of course), but now I'm going to do that on my fight tomorrow. I may use the manhattan GMAT books too if there's time... I'm taking the exam in 4 weeks, so should be okay.

Jan 17, 2016

The verbal score is what can really boost you past the 700 mark. Many of those who take the test aren't from the U.S. or Great Britain (e.g. they are from India, China, South America, etc.) and so they have trouble with the verbal section, which brings the average scores down for the verbal section on the GMAT. We (native English speakers) have quite an advantage IMO, if you don't suck at math.

MKballer

Jan 17, 2016

Everybody here is scoring 700+? I have only 650 (Q49/V31) and I am not a native speaker.

Jan 17, 2016

The GMATPrep software is very accurate. It predicted me as a 750 (first test) and 710 (second test). I would up getting a 760 with a 47 Quant (77%)/ 48 Verbal (99+%), similar to your situation. It sounds strange, but actually makes sense if you think about. Picture two guys, one being 5 foot 6 (somewhere below the fiftieth percentile, if that)and another guy who is seven feet tall (99+) percentile. Average their combined heights and you get 6 foot 3 guy, which is well into the 90th percentile. Point is, if your verbal score is outrageous (not hard, with all the asians taking the test these days) you can skew the total way up even with an average quant score (though schools will see the individual grades...)

Jan 17, 2016

Kaplan tests wayyyyyyy understate your score, I did 690 as my best Kaplan and got 790 on the day.

MBA.com is generally accurate, did 780s on those pre test.

Just focus on verbal, quant part matters wayyy less. And verbal is still very formulaic and easy to study for.

Jan 17, 2016

Just as an added note:

I believe the GMAT is even better for the verbally inclined than previously stated. From what I understand, since the test has only 37 Quant problems and 41 Verbal problems (4 more) it turns out that the test is not simply an average of the the Quant + Verbal sections, but rather slightly skewed towards the Verbal section.

Since inherently Quant comes easier to us As finance peoples, our emphasis should be on the Verbal section. Not only because the curve may be higher, but rather also that swings in our Verbal percentile, may have a slightly larger effect on our Overall percentiles.

Good luck to all.

Jan 17, 2016

Please feel free to Sentence Correct my above post if you need extra practice.

Jan 17, 2016

I've always been amazed that you can get an 80th percentile quant and 80th percentile verbal, yet be in the 95th percentile for the entire exam.

OP I take the GMAT on Saturday morning (yes scheduling fail, I have no idea why I picked Masters weekend but what can you do) but I will post in this thread when I get my score.

On my last 3 Manhattan CATs I've scored 690, 710, 700 and I got a 650 on Kaplan today (you're supposed to add 50 to 70 because their scoring algorithm is seriously messed up) but on the GMAT Prep I scored a 730. As long as my score is over a 700 I'm good, but hopefully it is closer to 730 than 700.

Jan 17, 2016
southernstunna:

I've always been amazed that you can get an 80th percentile quant and 80th percentile verbal, yet be in the 95th percentile for the entire exam.

OP I take the GMAT on Saturday morning (yes scheduling fail, I have no idea why I picked Masters weekend but what can you do) but I will post in this thread when I get my score.

On my last 3 Manhattan CATs I've scored 690, 710, 700 and I got a 650 on Kaplan today (you're supposed to add 50 to 70 because their scoring algorithm is seriously messed up) but on the GMAT Prep I scored a 730. As long as my score is over a 700 I'm good, but hopefully it is closer to 730 than 700.

good luck bro.

Jan 17, 2016

^yeah... I guess I've just been using calculators/excel for so long that I can't compute things through as well as I once could... I have to keep working o that. I did it again and pretty much the same story... 750 again. 46 Q 49 V. only missed 10 quant q's this time but still ended up at the same 46... I gotta work on that. Almost all the ones I missed were problem solving again ---strange.

Jan 17, 2016

how did the GMAT go Southernstunna?

Jan 17, 2016

when you first start studying, is it better to take a practice exam without any review at all? or a little review?

Jan 17, 2016

doesn't really matter, sorta just depends how much time you have and what your style is. all else being equal, probably not a bad idea to start with a practice exam because if you haven't taken a standardized test in a while, you might not remember what they're like in a general sense.

Jan 17, 2016

You can check answers at the end of the practice tests.

Jan 17, 2016

abacb - okay well at least thats an option, I didn't want to take the whole thing and just get a score and be able to analyze what I missed. Thanks for the info.

But regardless of that, when you were taking them did you have the option to check the answer as you were solving each question?

Jan 17, 2016

No, the option to check was only in the end. Otherwise the whole timing thing doesn't work. Main goal of the practice test is to simulate test environment, not error correction or whatever else.

If you just want to check and go, you are better off using normal problems (I never used the ones in the software, might be an option there or with some other vendor) in OG books or something. I'd suggest doing 20 or so at once, check which ones you got wrong, etc. Otherwise you are spending too much time flipping thru the pages, and also you can see the next one already.

Jan 17, 2016
abacab:

No, the option to check was only in the end. Otherwise the whole timing thing doesn't work. Main goal of the practice test is to simulate test environment, not error correction or whatever else.

If you just want to check and go, you are better off using normal problems (I never used the ones in the software, might be an option there or with some other vendor) in OG books or something. I'd suggest doing 20 or so at once, check which ones you got wrong, etc. Otherwise you are spending too much time flipping thru the pages, and also you can see the next one already.

+1. The test isn't intended to be test prep. Just use it to get an idea of your testing range.

Jan 17, 2016

Gotcha, thanks a lot ... I just wanted to make sure I had access to answers (either while taking the test or after) I got wrong if I took the whole thing... thanks again

Jan 17, 2016

Manhattangmat.com have 6 practice tests for like $10 in total, Veritasprep have one practice test for free and remember that you get 2 tests from MBA.com when you sign up for the test.

Good luck.

Jan 17, 2016

The most important thing the Manhattan tests do is help you practice timing. So I'd definitely take all of them over the next two weeks if you can. The key is to review every questions after you finished and figure out what mistakes you made (timing, math errors, etc.)

Have you taken the two practice tests that you get for signing up for the GMAT, because those will be the closest to the actual exam. I think gmatclub might have a few free practice tests also.

As far as the harder part goes - I definitely did better on the actual GMAT math then I did on the Manhattan practice exams. Verbal on the other hand was all over the place.

Jan 17, 2016

Save the GMAT prep and take it when you are fully prepared. That score is quite accurate and usually should be no more than 20 points away from your real score.

BREAK CATCH-22
Fan of Yuzuru Hanyu

Jan 17, 2016
WhyYUNAistaken:

Save the GMAT prep and take it when you are fully prepared. That score is quite accurate and usually should be no more than 20 points away from your real score.

I would definitely emphasize "should" here. My score on the actual exam was either 60 or 70 points higher than on my MBA mock test.

Jan 17, 2016

Look online at gmatprep.con and download the 700+ question document that someone compiled from the GMAT prep software. Get to know those problems, especially the DS ones. There are patterns I guarantee you will see on your test.

I would also download the official GMAT questions expansion pack and be able to do all the 'medium' level DS questions, and understand most of the 'hard' questions. Make flash cards if you see a pattern.

Finally, in these last few weeks, I wouldn't touch any problem that isn't from the GMAT Prep company and isn't an old exam question. There are nuances in the actual exam questions that you will pick up on. I promise you focusing on these actual retired questions, and seeing these patterns, will cause you to guess correctly on the exam a few more times and push you toward a top score .

Jan 17, 2016
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Jan 17, 2016