Comments (28)

Feb 15, 2019
  • Lost illusions - Balzac
  • Inherent vice or Vineland - Thomas pynchon
  • Teatro grottesco - Thomas ligotti
  • the catcher in the rye - jd Salinger
  • the third policeman - Flann O'Brien
  • the elementary particles - Michel houllebecq
  • the black Dahlia - James ellroy
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Feb 20, 2019

FIFTY SHADES OF GRAY

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Feb 15, 2019

Kissinger by Walter Isaacson

Cash and cash equivalents: $138,311
Financial instruments and other inventory positions owned: $448,166

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Feb 15, 2019

Hey OP, some of my recent favourites.

  1. Bad Blood: Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Start Up- John Carreyrou
  2. Ego is the enemy- Ryan Holiday
  3. Gulag Archipelago abridged version- Alexander Solzhenitsyn
  4. Political Tribes-Amy Chua
  5. Battle Hymn of The Tiger Mother-Amy Chua
  6. The Coddling of the American Mind- Jonathan Haidt and Greg Lukianoff
  7. Titan: The Life of John D Rockefeller- Ron Chernow
  8. Give People Money-Annie Lowrey
  9. Young Money: Inside the Hidden World of Wall Street's Post-Crash Recruits- Kevin Roose
  10. Fifth Risk- Michael Lewis
  11. Jobs- Walter Isaacson

There is also a mini story called Dirty John on the LA Times, one of the best pieces I have read in a while- its a six part read. Just been made into a Netflix series to, released yesterday :) .

Cheers

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Feb 15, 2019

+1 for Bad Blood.

Really enjoyed the audiobook!

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Feb 15, 2019

Reading that at the moment , very intriguing book indeed

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Feb 15, 2019
Rawb1:

1. Bad Blood: Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Start Up- John Carreyrou
7. Titan: The Life of John D Rockefeller- Ron Chernow
10. Fifth Risk- Michael Lewis
11. Jobs- Walter Isaacson

I've read the first three recently - excellent - and Jobs' biography is one of my all-time favorites.

Some random other additions:

  • Confidence Game: How Hedge Fund Manager Bill Ackman Called Wall Street's Bluff - One of the most entertaining business books out there. Really captures the era of "The Big Short" (which is also excellent) before "The Big Short."
  • A Man in Full - Bonfire of the Vanities is more famous from Wolfe, but as a real estate guy, I will always have a soft spot for this novel.
  • Zero to One - Peter Thiel's tiny book is entertaining and makes you think. Plus you can blow through it on a rainy Saturday and enjoy yourself while doing so.
  • Raising the Bar - There are few development companies more impressive than Hines and few developers more impressive than Gerry himself. Raising the bar would be inspiration for anyone in the RE forum. I'm even a fan enough to have a signed copy.
  • King of Capital - Likewise, it's hard to recommend finance bios without recommending Steve Schwarzman's. Gives all of the interesting backstory to Blackstone.
  • The Death and Life of Great American Cities - Jane Jacob's absolute masterpiece is an ode to cities - their importance, how to build and manage them, the importance of public parks and public art in them, and how things like sidewalks foster livable communities for families.
  • Liar's Poker - Inspiring the name for this site, Liar's Poker is a hilarious true story of 80's bond traders and general wall street culture of the time.
  • Damn, It Feels Good to be a Banker - Similarly, some of the older people here might remember Leveraged Sellout, a blog that hilariously satirized, but also perfectly captured, early to mid 2000's pre-recession banking. Well, the same guy wrote a comedy book about it, and it's fantastic.
  • The Fountainhead - all of the idolization and/or backlash against Ayn Rand tends to get in the way of The Fountainhead being a really entertaining read. Harry Potter isn't a treatise on government either - novels don't have to define your worldview. Hell, one of my all-time favorite Michael Crichton books is "State of Fear." I, like 99.99% of scientists, still believe in the negative effects of man-made climate change. It's just a great book.
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Feb 15, 2019

The song for damn it feels good to be a banker is fire

Dayman?

Feb 18, 2019

Awesome list, can't wait to get my hands on some of these. Thank you!

"If you ain't first, you're last!" - GOAT

Feb 19, 2019

+1 on Jane Jacobs, have heard great things about this book in urban planning circles.

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Feb 15, 2019

My favorite for fiction is Brave New World just because it was so prescient and still relevant (probably more now than ever)

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Feb 15, 2019

I swear people are using it as a fucking roadmap more than a cautionary tail.

Feb 15, 2019

this is my absolute favorite...both very accesible, and very useful
https://amzn.to/2DF54DS

just google it...you're welcome

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Feb 15, 2019

Winning the losers game, Outliers, The Intelligent Investor, & Confessions of an Economic Hitman

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Feb 16, 2019
  • The Subtle Art of not Giving a F*ck
  • Habit
  • The War of Art
  • Never Eat Alone
  • Extreme Ownership
  • Mindset
  • The One Thing
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Feb 18, 2019

Second The Subtle Art of not Giving a F*ck, totally exceeded my expectations

Feb 16, 2019

Leviticus

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Feb 17, 2019

Business oriented book: The E-Myth: Why Most Small Businesses Fail

Great read about what it actually means to be an entrepreneur.

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Feb 16, 2019

I give this all of my business owner clients. Some truly great insights.

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Feb 17, 2019

Yeah, as a business owner (and another business owner gave it to me), I've read it at least 5 or 6 times. Has a different meaning each time based on where my head is at.

Feb 18, 2019

Sci Fi series: Foundation, Dune, The Expanse, Three Body Problem (Remembrance of Earth's Past trilogy)

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Feb 18, 2019

The Big Rich: must read for anybody in the energy industry

Empire of the Summer Moon: rise and fall of the Comanche tribe

Feb 19, 2019

Genghis Khan and the Making of the Modern World was a really good read. It didn't just talk about his conquests, but it dived into his leadership style and statesmanship tactics, as well as the impact and influence he had in history.

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Feb 20, 2019
BubbaBanker:

Genghis Khan and the Making of the Modern World was a really good read. It didn't just talk about his conquests, but it dived into his leadership style and statesmanship tactics, as well as the impact and influence he had in history.

Agreed, very good read, I read it a couple of years ago and I'm currently reading The Secret History of the Mongol Queens: How the Daughters of Genghis Khan Rescued His Empire, by the same Professor Weatherford - interesting in its own way, but doesn't top the first book.

Another favorite read of mine from the last 10 years or so, Michangelo and the Pope's Ceiling by Ross King - the descriptions of what a day consisted of for Michelangelo and his assistants as they tackled all the logistics of painting something as epic [epic in space, style and substance] as the Sistine Chapel - well, even these "quieter" elements of King's story grabbed me. It made me respect Michelangelo more and more deeply as I read into what it took to retain the necessary funds for materials for scaffolding, plaster and paints [sometimes traveling for many miles and days to the one monastery that made just one particular pigment!], mixing the various paints, transferring the outlines of the images into the wet ceiling to accomplish the amazing frescoes that we still enjoy today, so many hundreds of years after their original creation.

Add to that, King manages something along the lines of a history-in-context education course - you learn about the politics of the day, who the power brokers were, whether it was the Pope himself or one of the many Medici, who owned what land and who pledged allegiance to who.

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Feb 19, 2019
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Feb 20, 2019
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