How to Title Cold E-mails / InMails? & Salutations

I think that I have the body of my written cold contact down, and I obviously modify it for every contact after I research them and their firm, but how would you title these e-mails and InMails?

Right now, I'm using:
"Finance Student Seeking IB Career Guidance"

Also, which salutation is best to use?
I often find myself using "Thank you," but it seems kind of cheesy if you don't have anything to actually thank them for yet. And using it repeatedly with the same person seems... needy?

So I've been using "Regards." I've read that "Sincerely" works well, but it sort of implies that I need to confirm my sincerity. As if I'd be writing insincerely if I used a different salutation...

What say you?

Comments (25)

Apr 30, 2013

I always just used "Internship"

Apr 30, 2013
money money money money:

I always just used "Internship"

I'm going the informational meeting route.

Apr 30, 2013

then, to answer your second question "Thank you for your consideration. Best, name"

May 1, 2013

I've always used "(University name) Undergraduate Seeking Professional Advice"

May 1, 2013

"(University name) Student Interested in Speaking" works well, at least with alumni of the school

May 1, 2013

Fellow (School student's Mascot) looking for career advice

May 1, 2013

The people I'm contacting usually aren't alumni.

May 1, 2013

Think it's perfectly okay. Say you're a great talent - he would be more than interested in getting to know you. I would title the email "A piece of advice?" or maybe just "Coffee/Lunch" if you want to meet with the guy. In both cases of course clearly explain your reasons for approaching him.

May 1, 2013

It's totally appropriate. If the company you both work for is small or medium sized, you could also consider something like this as the subject: connection, or question from employee.

I wouldn't blindly ask him to forward your resume since he doesn't know you and what you want is for him to forward it to the recruiters with positive comments about you, not "some guy sent me his resume. Just forwarding it on". Ask for a few minutes to get some advice on how you might follow the path he took. Be prepared if you get him on the phone. You want to be impressive so that he does forward your resume with positive comments about you. If he's doing well there, that type of intro can make an enormous difference. see The Email Introductions Most Likely to Open Doors - http://bit.ly/Uho6F
Here's something else to take a look at regarding networking and how often you reach out to people who aren't getting back to you.
Networking Dilemma: When do you become annoying? - http://bit.ly/Bhm0b
Gotta Mentor
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Gotta Mentor
Connect to the Advice & People
You Need to Achieve Your Career Goals

May 1, 2013

Try "Catching up," "checking in," or "updates."

May 1, 2013

I know "URGENT" "ASAP" "mayday" "are usually good ones to avoid.

May 1, 2013

#yoloswag usually gets my attention

May 1, 2013

Nothing about cialis.

May 1, 2013

Thanks for the suggestions guys, ended up going with "Tryna Hire Me This Time?". Much appreciated!

May 1, 2013

It really depends on who you talk to. I've read articles that say you have 60 characters to grab the readers attention without them having to open it and to put your objective and something outstanding about yourself in it. for you, it could be like "IB Analyst - Resume from Silent Guardian - 3.9 GPA WSO Univ. Graduate"

But then I've also read on the same day that it should be left at "IB Analyst - Resume from Silent Guardian".

So it can go either way, but in the end, in this day and age, it won't get read by a person unless your resume makes it past 30 computer screens.

May 1, 2013

When you say "Job Listings", I am assuming this is from the career section of a company's website or other online job boards, in which case, you will need to navigate around the ATS filters they have in place in order to get your resume into the right hands. In this case, I don't think it wouldn't make a difference whether your GPA was in the title or the body of a resume, as long as it's there. Now if it's going straight to a "human" reader, then consider putting it into your title without being overzealous.

May 1, 2013

Who the hell puts a GPA in the subject of an email? You just put the job title....

May 1, 2013
yeahright:

Who the hell puts a GPA in the subject of an email? You just put the job title....

That's the idea. If I am a hiring manager at a small firm with several dozen resumes I will open the one with the very good GPA listed in the title first. If everyone did it then the people with the 3.8-3.89 would not get looked at until the manager has seen all the people with the 3.9-4.0.

"He that hath a beard is more than a youth, and he that hath no beard is less than a man." -- William Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing

May 1, 2013

If I was a hiring manager I wouldn't judge a GPA without at least looking at the candidate's major. A 3.9+ in American Studies or Political Science is much less impressive than a 3.6+ in engineering.

May 1, 2013
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May 1, 2013
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Oui!oui!oui! Money Gives Power, Power Buys Positions