Love the Job You're With

Love the [Job] You're With

"MGoTrade, just wanted to follow up regarding that interview with you. They've decided to move on to other applicants. If there are any other opportunities that fit your experience, we will let you know."

We've all been there. You hear of an opportunity and you want to make it happen. You spend hours picking at your resume and cover letter (which you know they'll only spend 15 seconds reading anyway). You call every friend and friend of a friend you can to learn everything possible about the company or industry into which you're applying. You hear back that the company's interested and that they want to bring you in. Then, there is delay after scheduling delay. This guy's traveling, and that guy's booked. Finally, the planets align and you get that itinerary. Next thing you know, you wake up to the hotel phone recording: "This is your wakeup call. Good luck today."

Game time.

You answer all their questions. You bring up all relevant experience. You smile when you should and appear reassuring, but not cocky.

You're tired, beyond hungry, and you smile at the receptionist as you walk out.

A few days pass. A week. Two weeks. Then heartbreak. You've failed.

Or did you?

It's human nature to become hopeful and optimistic when an opportunity for progress arises. Especially, for those of us early in our careers, every new opportunity seems like it'll be "that one" that will launch us to the next level. But, most of the time, that next big job goes to someone else. Is it something you said? Something you did? Statistically speaking, probably not.

We could discuss for hours, and go through many bottles at the club, the reasons why people get dinged or passed over. The next morning, when you wake up hungover, you need to think about what to do next. Certainly, you'll want to keep looking, but, in the meantime, you'll want to just make do. You'll want to learn to love the job you're with.

Next time you're in your cube, stand up. Look around you. These are all just people, like you, that are trying to get by and perform to the company's expectations. They will probably have the similar hopes and dreams, and talent and ability, as you. That's why we all got hired, right? Instead of becoming despondent because you can't jump ship, why not try to make the best out of your current situation? Do your best to bond with your co-workers and build more professional relationships (networking). If your future at this company is proving untenable to you, it probably is to your teammates as well. Maybe, one of them will land a big opportunity first, and he'll recommend to the new boss that you be brought in, too.

Keep working hard, because, at the end of the day, you are still earning valuable experience. You're learning how to deal with an unfavorable work environment. Whether you realize it or not, you're learning the answer to one of the best interview questions ever: "Tell me about a time when you overcame a challenge at work?"

Push yourself through work stress and you will find strength you didn't know you had. You will learn, after all, that maybe your situation isn't as bad as you thought. You might also find, after taking some days to think, that that particular job wasn't the pie in the sky you thought it'd be. And, if you're gainfully employed and on this website, a lot of people would love to take your job right now.

So, maybe it's time we take a step back, look around, and make the best of the jobs we're in. After all, if you can't be in the job you want, love the job you're with.

Comments (9)

Dec 20, 2012

Thought definitely positive, my personal opinion on the matter is that there's simply too high of an opportunity cost to be in a job you "hate". I would use that hatred to fuel your ambition to aim for higher grounds instead of trying to love the job I hate. But in the mean time, your advice should definitely be heeded until higher grounds are achieved - the worst thing one can do to oneself is let their hatred consume them instead of seeking better change.

Dec 22, 2012

Toshi, this is exactly the point. Make the best of your current situation until you can find a better opportunity. To everyone out there asking "what if you don't have a job?" You get a job, ANY JOB, and make the best of it until you can get that new opportunity. I didn't have the job I wanted when I graduated college. But, I still needed money. So, I grabbed the first restaurant gig I could, and made the best of it. Soon, I had the only set of keys beside the owner and chef. They put me in charge because they knew I could and would deliver the results they wanted. When I did land a big-time interview, I was able to say "You know what, maybe it wasn't the best job, but I made the best of it, I learned everything I could, and I delivered consistent results." Employers want to hire someone that will is capable of doing everything possible to deliver the best results.

Dec 20, 2012

Hope is irrational.

"...all truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident."

  • Schopenhauer
Dec 20, 2012

what if you don't have a job?
you go through the same process, interview, then get rejected. what do you do there?

Born in hell, forged from suffering, hardened by pain.

Dec 21, 2012
brianklk:

what if you don't have a job?
you go through the same process, interview, then get rejected. what do you do there?

you go to one of the 10000 other threads on WSO and look at their advice

    • 1
Dec 21, 2012
brianklk:

what if you don't have a job?
you go through the same process, interview, then get rejected. what do you do there?

drink heavily

Dec 21, 2012

This isn't bad advice. I want to move to an investment management firm. At the same time, I really love my job in ER. Of course, IB is a different story.

Dec 21, 2012

be a worker among workers
if you have don't have a job (and even if you do), be a friend among friends

Dec 21, 2012
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