Am I URM?

Jose.Rey's picture
Rank: Baboon | 161

Born in Panama to cracker ass parents, do I consider myself hispanic or latino?

I typically skip that section if I fill out shit that asks but for business school I'm looking for any edge I can get. Thoughts?

Region: 
Mexico + Central America

Comments (25)

Mar 8, 2011

I would say no. Your considered Caucasian.

You give me a gift? BAM Thank you note! You invite me somewhere? POW RSVP! You do me a favor? WHAM Favor returned! Do not test my politeness.

Mar 8, 2011
1man2nv:

I would say no. Your considered Caucasian.

This was my initial thought but then I read about official definitions. Turns out there is a selection that states "hispanic or latino, regardless of race." So to clarify, do I check that box?

Mar 8, 2011

I honestly think that like saying i'm white was born in Africa while my parents where on a safari, so i'm going to check the african american box lol. I honestly believe its about your family roots. I just wouldn't want you to get screwed when you show up to an interview and their like what the hell?!? haha..

You give me a gift? BAM Thank you note! You invite me somewhere? POW RSVP! You do me a favor? WHAM Favor returned! Do not test my politeness.

Apr 7, 2014

I actually have a friend who does this. His family is French and his grandma was born in Tunisia when is was a French colony. So, technically, he is like an eighth African. He checks off African American on everything.

I think the reason why applications are increasingly calling it "people of color" rather than doing it based on the location of one's birth (i.e. African, Hispanic, etc) is an attempt to weed out all of the rich white kids who were born in random exotic countries while their parents were on vacation.

Also in response to OP, I've seen lots of applications that distinguish between white hispanics and non-white hispanics so I don't think you're gonna get that edge without lying.

On a side note, I'm also pretty interested about how this actually works. From my experience the whole URM thing is a great idea but is being handled kind of shitty. I got an email a few weeks ago from BB I-bank about an on-campus info-session. At the bottom of the email, it enumerates all the relevant logistical information, such as the date, time and location of the event. Then it states "Who is invited: Women, individuals who identify themselves with the lgbtq community, people of color." To me this seems like blatant racism, not because these groups aren't entitled to having individualized info-session if thats going to make them feel more comfortable, I just feel like if an email was sent out that had "people who are invited: "white people, heterosexual men" the school would be sued into bankruptcy. Granted I dont know very much about the subtleties of the police.

Mar 8, 2011

I know we are all looking for that edge to push us over the edge, but if you have to ask, you probably know the answer. On the other hand, if the hardships of being hispanic or latino are associated with their environment, then maybe you do qualify. I find the whole "regardless of race" thing confusing. The only way to know is to call admissions and explain your situation.

Mar 8, 2011
NavalMonkey:

I know we are all looking for that edge to push us over the edge, but if you have to ask, you probably know the answer. On the other hand, if the hardships of being hispanic or latino are associated with their environment, then maybe you do qualify. I find the whole "regardless of race" thing confusing. The only way to know is to call admissions and explain your situation.

What if I explain my situation...in spanish? Then I'll get the tan of a lifetime before interviews.

But not only was I born in Panama, I was conceived there. So that puts any "origins" question to bed, no pun intended. So I'm surely from hispanic origins, regardless of race.

And my aunt is panamanian and she cooks the shit out of plantanos fritos every holiday, so I feel the roots. I had dual citizenship until I was 18, maybe I should look into reviving the dual citizenship.

You're probably right though, playing dumb works in court because the judge can't see your resume but for admissions to higher learning, I could get burned.

Mar 8, 2011

I'd use it. Is your last name ethnic sounding? If you have to ask I don't think anyone else will question you about it.

Mar 8, 2011
<span class=keyword_link><a href=/finance-dictionary/what-is-london-interbank-offer-rate-libor rel=nofollow>LIBOR</a></span>:

I'd use it. Is your last name ethnic sounding? If you have to ask I don't think anyone else will question you about it.

No, my last name doesn't end in an o or a. It is english and sounds that way, although it's uncommon, not like smith.

Mar 8, 2011

if your name is Jose, then you qualify.

Mar 8, 2011
Guest1655:

if your name is Jose, then you qualify.

If I chop off a couple of letters. This could work, like if your name is stanley, you might put stan on the application. I'm feeling more hispanic by the minute. I'm going to get a rimmed up civic tomorrow and fill it with cases of fanta.

Mar 8, 2011
Jose.Rey:
Guest1655:

if your name is Jose, then you qualify.

If I chop off a couple of letters. This could work, like if your name is stanley, you might put stan on the application. I'm feeling more hispanic by the minute. I'm going to get a rimmed up civic tomorrow and fill it with cases of fanta.

Haha let us know how that goes.

Mar 8, 2011
Jose.Rey:
Guest1655:

if your name is Jose, then you qualify.

If I chop off a couple of letters. This could work, like if your name is stanley, you might put stan on the application. I'm feeling more hispanic by the minute. I'm going to get a rimmed up civic tomorrow and fill it with cases of fanta.

only if that fanta comes in the Glass bottles and is made with cane sugar. *high fructose corn syrup is a dead giveaway of not being a URM.

Mar 8, 2011

Most forms now specify 'Non-Caucasian Hispanic or Latino' as the option as of the last census.

Mar 8, 2011

are you serious, why would you be hispanic if your parents are white and from canada.

yeah if your grandma is from panama then you have your quarter latino in you but thats it. Would I be chinese/asian because I was born in China? Certainly not, except from the passport but that doesnt have anything to do with my ethnicity.

If you wanna play the minority card go with that quarter and it might do the job, but dont be suprised if people think you bullshit them because you are white as a piece of paper.

Mar 8, 2011

I'm 1/64th native american, I want my goddamn reparations y'hear!

Mar 8, 2011

Why would you ask a quesiton if you clearly have you mind made up? Anyone that says bad idea you have an excuse as to why it may work. Where you are born doesn't matter, your ethnicity does.

Do whatever you think is right. Don't try and get a small edge and get rejected because of it.

Mar 8, 2011

Just to add on to that, there are hispanics/latinos that don't "look" hispanic or latino, but were born and lived in their home country their entire lives. That's generally what's by meant by "hispanic / latino, regardless of race". I'd definitely call using a number other than your own (or *67) and ask before entering that.

Mar 8, 2011

Your right I know a girl that is 100% cuban but she like white as day lol.....

You give me a gift? BAM Thank you note! You invite me somewhere? POW RSVP! You do me a favor? WHAM Favor returned! Do not test my politeness.

Mar 8, 2011

I think the trade-off here is pretty simple. Your morals vs a slight edge. I don't think you will get called out on it and/or have to justify "well just how hispanic are you?". But you will have to live with getting in using an unfair advantage, and always thinking that you might not have made the cut if not for your BS.

Mar 8, 2011
Dr Joe:

I think the trade-off here is pretty simple. Your morals vs a slight edge. I don't think you will get called out on it and/or have to justify "well just how hispanic are you?". But you will have to live with getting in using an unfair advantage, and always thinking that you might not have made the cut if not for your BS.

I somehow feel that this is something a lot of people could live with...

Mar 8, 2011

Dr Joe is right, but on the other hand if you technically fit within the description of a URM, you're not getting an unfair advantage, you're beating the system at its own game. That will earn you some applause from my side of the internet.

EDIT: Full disclosure, I'm against affirmative action.

Mar 8, 2011

Yes you are an URM. I would however never try to get an advantage using it. You end up in places where you did not prepare well enough if you try to game the system.

A ton of kids at my company with URM background all left or got fired within the 1st 18mos, because a lot of them were very unqualified or were perceived as such, which can make put a ton of unwanted pressure on you.

Mar 8, 2011

Technically, you are EITHER Caucasian or Hispanic/Latino for the applications. It's really your choice, which just goes to show how fluid it's becoming.

As you already know, "Hispanics/Latinos" technically means American citizens (and green card holders) who are originally from Central and South American countries (or whose parents were from there and emigrated to the US). And as you know, there's White Mexicans, Black Cubans, and Aboriginal Peruvians and Asian Brazilians. But they could still consider themselves "Hispanics/Latino".

For example, if Gisele Bundchen was a US citizen, she would either be classified as Caucasian, or Latino/Hispanic (same with Cameron Diaz).

Sammy Sosa (or any black Dominican) would be Latino/Hispanic if he became a US citizen, but could also claim to be "African-American" (if he could magically remember how to speak English).

Or Americans whose parents are Argentinian (of Italian or German heritage) - could also be considered Hispanic/Latino, or Caucasian.

It's just a very crude way of lumping people together. Sort of like how Indians and Japanese are both considered "Asian". And how Iranian-Americans consider themselves Caucasian.

Anyhow, for the purposes of b-school admissions, I think it's easy to overstate the importance of ethnicity. It's not irrelevant, but it's not as big a factor as you may think - especially if you don't have a long history of community/political/extracurricular involvement affiliated your heritage/ethnicity. In other words, it won't matter much if it's only skin deep; and will matter more if you have some a longer history of involvement in your community (but that would make you a stronger candidate regardless since it's extracurriculars that you would find meaningful anyhow).

I get questions like this once in a while from those with Native American ancestry. If you have it, it's worth checking the box, but knowing full well that it's not really going to make much difference if you are Native American in blood only and you haven't really done anything in your life with your Native American community (politics, nonprofit, cultural, arts, etc.).

The most important part of your raw profile is still your resume and GMAT/GPA.

Oct 14, 2012
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