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Comments (32)

Dec 3, 2011

what are your career goals?

Dec 3, 2011

For what it's worth, having looked heavily into the JD/MBA degree as I was researching for my applications, a 3-year degree is not respected as well as the 4 year options. I can't be bothered to dig out the article, but I believe one of the deans at SLS who was on their action committee when it came up for debate (switching from their 4-year flagship offering to the 3-year everyone seems to favor) simply said, "We considered it because of the competition for students," says Mr. Kramer. "Unaltered, the programs are five years' worth of study. To cut 40% was just not responsible." (http://online.wsj.com/article/SB124277262053136545...).
A lot of people think that in this hiring environment, it's wiser to take on less debt and spend less time out of the workforce, but be aware that a lot of firms are aware which programs are 3 years versus 4 and have different ideas of each's worth.

Dec 5, 2011
A Posse Ad Esse:

For what it's worth, having looked heavily into the JD/MBA degree as I was researching for my applications, a 3-year degree is not respected as well as the 4 year options. I can't be bothered to dig out the article, but I believe one of the deans at SLS who was on their action committee when it came up for debate (switching from their 4-year flagship offering to the 3-year everyone seems to favor) simply said, "We considered it because of the competition for students," says Mr. Kramer. "Unaltered, the programs are five years' worth of study. To cut 40% was just not responsible." (http://online.wsj.com/article/SB124277262053136545...).
A lot of people think that in this hiring environment, it's wiser to take on less debt and spend less time out of the workforce, but be aware that a lot of firms are aware which programs are 3 years versus 4 and have different ideas of each's worth.

Penn and Columbia offer both a 3-year and 4-year jd/mba programs. And northwestern offers just the 3-year program. From what I have seen, the northwestern students did just fine with job placements, and I don't see any evidence that recruiters are wary because the program was 3 as opposed to 4 years.

Dec 3, 2011

Do you have work experience? This matters a lot.

Also, to echo the above question: What are your career goals?

Mar 21, 2017

0

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Mar 21, 2017

1

Mar 21, 2017

Im thinking even if the MBA might not help me all that much now, it will help if I ever want to lateral out of law into business later on in my career. Am I wrong?

Dec 3, 2011

An MBA is not going to help you much academically. In my opinion, the degree is essentially just a right of passage.

A JD is much more respected and you will actually learn a lot.

All in all, if you plan on doing corp fin down the road (corpdev/M&A) a JD/MBA will help out greatly.

Dec 3, 2011

In my opinion, down the road your MBA will be worthless. From what i have learned about MBA it is only useful as a way to get a job immediately when you graduate or when your company requires it for promotion. It is also useful for the network. It is pretty much worthless down the line say in 5-10years. In 5-10 years you will be the same as anyone else applying for the job and only your network, recommendations and experience will matter. I see plenty of lawyers switching to IB or corp finance without an MBA, but because they've done a good job and have a strong network. IF you are a corporate lawyer you will constantly interact with people all over banking so opportunities to develop relationships are huge.

That said it doesn't seem that an MBA will cost you much more so it might be a viable option, just make sure it doesn't make your JD look weaker.

Do what you want not what you can!

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Mar 21, 2017

4

Dec 3, 2011

Ya, that doesn't make sense. Most people will respect a JD/MBA from accredited institutions.

Dec 3, 2011

JD/MBA sends a mixed message - Are you a lawyer or a banker? While it might be a plus to have law experience in banking I think JD looks stronger in the eyes of law firms.

Do what you want not what you can!

Dec 3, 2011
bossman:

JD/MBA sends a mixed message - Are you a lawyer or a banker? While it might be a plus to have law experience in banking I think JD looks stronger in the eyes of law firms.

This is so fucking dumb it isn't even funny.

Knowing the law in an area of finance sends no mixed signals. Go work in M&A for an A&D firm or other large F500 and see how much value an MBA holds against a JD.

Dec 4, 2011
Nefarious-:
bossman:

JD/MBA sends a mixed message - Are you a lawyer or a banker? While it might be a plus to have law experience in banking I think JD looks stronger in the eyes of law firms.

This is so fucking dumb it isn't even funny.

Knowing the law in an area of finance sends no mixed signals. Go work in M&A for an A&D firm or other large F500 and see how much value an MBA holds against a JD.

Actually, he's right. There is a pretty common sentiment that jd/mba's often have a hard time finding legal jobs because of hw bad the market is for lawyers and firms see them as flight risks. And dude, you don't really learn shit in law school the same as MBA programs.

Mar 21, 2017

hmmmm

Dec 5, 2011

What are your grades in law school? A JD is no free ticket to a great job, even at a great school like Cornell. Many people with mediocre experience/GPA/ECs end up taking jobs that didn't even require passing the bar or going into debt.

Dec 5, 2011

You probably know this, but --- I think if you're someone who is interested to going into corporate law - m&a or something else with a lot of business considerations - adding the MBA could be valuable. The key thing, however, as some people have alluded too, is that your law grades have to be REALLY GOOD to get a good big law gig these days. Obviously Cornell is a strong law school being in the lower part of the V-14, but it's still not H-Y-S, and you're going to need to good grades. So I guess what I'm saying is: don't let getting the MBA screw up your law school grades.

Dec 3, 2011

I can make up internet networks as well.

Lloyd Blankfein is in mine.

You still ignored my question about whether or not you are still in college.

Dec 4, 2011
Nefarious-:

I can make up internet networks as well.

Lloyd Blankfein is in mine.

You still ignored my question about whether or not you are still in college.

I didn't answer the question because you already knew I am an untraditional senior. And you were attempting to build a fallacious and idiotic ad hominem argument went your posts made it clear to anyone with an passing level of knowledge that you clearly don't understand what you are talking about I regards to law school. As to whether I made up the network, I guess that's a fair concern, but if you had any knowledge of the legal market you would probably doubt it less.

OP, sorry for the side tangent. I don't necessarily have the b school knowledge but my understanding is, that if you are sure you want to work as a lawyer, you are better off taking on less debt and less risk of being perceived as a flight risk. This is especially true if you don't have the work experience commiserate with someone in a top mba program. I'll let someone else answer the question about cornell's mba program.

Dec 3, 2011
bears1208:
Nefarious-:

I can make up internet networks as well.

Lloyd Blankfein is in mine.

You still ignored my question about whether or not you are still in college.

I didn't answer the question because you already knew I am an untraditional senior. And you were attempting to build a fallacious and idiotic ad hominem argument went your posts made it clear to anyone with an passing level of knowledge that you clearly don't understand what you are talking about I regards to law school. As to whether I made up the network, I guess that's a fair concern, but if you had any knowledge of the legal market you would probably doubt it less.

OP, sorry for the side tangent. I don't necessarily have the b school knowledge but my understanding is, that if you are sure you want to work as a lawyer, you are better off taking on less debt and less risk of being perceived as a flight risk. This is especially true if you don't have the work experience commiserate with someone in a top mba program. I'll let someone else answer the question about cornell's mba program.

K. That is what I thought.

The next time you feel like adding value to a thread, realize you hold only a high school diploma, have no real world experience and thus, have no value to add.

Mar 21, 2017

1

Dec 5, 2011

What would it hurt if you did the MBA too? You could still be a lawyer, it gives you, at least the perception, of more knowledge, etc. I would definitely do it simply because it seems like a logical trade off. Extra year of school for, potentially more opportunities. Plus it gives you another year for the god awful law-job market to get better.

If I had asked people what they wanted, they would have said faster horses - Henry Ford