Go for Brand-Name?

A friend of mine is choosing between two offers: a brand-name insurance company and a high frequency trading firm. She wants to do trading in the future. I suggested her to go for the HFT firm since it's trading, and the job should be more interesting. She's concerned that because it's really a no-name firm, it might not appear to be as good as the insurance company (where she will do capital management).

I asked a couple of my friends and nearly all of them said go for the HFT firm because you definitely learn more on that job.

I would love to hear your opinion on this.

Comments (14)

Apr 13, 2012

Relevant experience is relevant experience. If she wants to do trading, why would she go to a role that does capital management rather than a role that does trading?

Apr 13, 2012

A well-known name stands out on the resume? If you go into a prop trading firm that no one heard about before, and you don't want to stay at the prop trading firm after the summer - would you go for the prop firm?

Apr 13, 2012

You're correct.

Let's reframe this: Janitor at Morgan Stanley or TRADER applying for a TRADING job.

There you go.

Apr 13, 2012
UFOinsider:

You're correct.

Let's reframe this: Janitor at Morgan Stanley or TRADER applying for a TRADING job.

There you go.

I wouldn't equate janitor to capital management.

Apr 13, 2012

edit: just noticed this was for an internship, nevermind.

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Apr 13, 2012

Dont go for the insurance company...i've had the unfortunate pleasure of working at a reinsurance company for two years..

You need to keep in mind that there are really only two "well-known" HFT firms: Renaissance and Getco. In my opinion, the more obscure the HFT firm the better, given that they have a good AUM.

Apr 13, 2012
Bernankey:

Dont go for the insurance company...i've had the unfortunate pleasure of working at a reinsurance company for two years..

You need to keep in mind that there are really only two "well-known" HFT firms: Renaissance and Getco. In my opinion, the more obscure the HFT firm the better, given that they have a good AUM.

I would add Citadel in there too. But ya, this HFT firm she has got is very very obscure and rather secretive (they don't even say they're a finance firm). Not sure if that's a good thing.

Apr 13, 2012
Bernankey:

Dont go for the insurance company...i've had the unfortunate pleasure of working at a reinsurance company for two years..

You need to keep in mind that there are really only two "well-known" HFT firms: Renaissance and Getco. In my opinion, the more obscure the HFT firm the better, given that they have a good AUM.

What do you define as a good AUM?

Apr 14, 2012
jesus of nazareth:
Bernankey:

Dont go for the insurance company...i've had the unfortunate pleasure of working at a reinsurance company for two years..

You need to keep in mind that there are really only two "well-known" HFT firms: Renaissance and Getco. In my opinion, the more obscure the HFT firm the better, given that they have a good AUM.

What do you define as a good AUM?

It really depends on their strategy...if this was just a general HF then id say at least 500m

Apr 13, 2012

HFT, no contest. If you're in the business, there are dozens of well-known firms.

Also, she will learn nothing at an insurance company.

Apr 13, 2012
dabanobo:

HFT, no contest. If you're in the business, there are dozens of well-known firms.

Also, she will learn nothing at an insurance company.

This.

Apr 13, 2012

I told her. She's definitely more interested in the HFT firm. But she's not a quant or anything - how much does the HFT internship actually add value? (She wants to do sales & trading after graduation).

Apr 14, 2012

Females tend to more risk-averse, therefore choosing the firm with the more perceived recognition to the common man on the street

Apr 14, 2012
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