taking a gap year before starting IB full time? burned out?

I have an IBD SA offer from a top BB this summer as a junior at a target; I'm incredibly grateful for the opportunity and know that finance/IB is what I want to pursue in the future. However, the more I think about how brutal the analyst stint will be, the more I think about how burned out I already am from college and whether jumping straight into a job that will burn me out even further is the best move. I am considering taking a gap year after graduation to travel/chill/work for a startup/relax before I dive headfirst into IB. What is the best way to go about doing this/communicating this to HR when the time comes? Does anyone know someone who has done this before?

If I end up receiving a return offer, it is possible at all to delay my FT start date for a year? Or should I ask for a return SA position instead of an FT offer? If I do not receive a return offer, should I rerecruit for an SA position for the following summer (the summer I graduate)?

Given the possibility of a recession in 2020, is it a stupid move to ask for too much and should I just suck it up and go straight into the workforce? Thanks in advance

Comments (4)

Dec 3, 2018

Dude suck it up and go start your career IMO. Burnt out after college? How are you going to make it through these analyst years if you are burnt out from college? People get burnt out from IB and GO BACK to college for a break!

Dec 3, 2018

Most banks won't allow you to do a SA position the summer after you graduate because you need to have remaining credits following your internship (not sure why this is; might be a tax thing/the fact that you're a contractor for the firm in a way). On that note, you could add a minor and tack on some extra classes the following fall semester and take the one semester of light class load and winter semester off as your gap time.

I think communicating to HR that you want a gap year would be suicide. There is a line of students miles long that are willing and capable of occupying that position. Don't think it's beyond the bank or HR; it's their obligation to fill the job.

Let me offer you some perspective: if this truly is what you want to pursue, and you are passionate about the work, burning out should be far less of a concern to you than it seems to be. If it is so pressing that you feel you need to essentially shoot yourself in the foot, maybe this isn't your passion. I don't mean to make false assumptions, but again, there are thousands of students and professionals that would jump at the opportunity to take that role - why risk it at all?

For some context, I am in somewhat of a similar situation as you, and I'm trying to start EARLIER than they would typically allow.

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Dec 3, 2018

Valid points, thanks

Dec 3, 2018
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