Watching others leave early is demoralizing - what do I do?

ian88's picture
Rank: Senior Chimp | banana points 23

My average hours are 8am-12am. This is not deal or project specific - but just a requirement of my boss who is a workaholic. Other juniors at my firm work 9am-6pm, take long lunch breaks to go to the gym, go on group coffee breaks etc.

I obviously don't like the fact that -
1. Other juniors are getting paid the same as me;
2. They have very little oversight;
3. Their bosses don't have the same drive to produce output;
4. The hours worked decreases my ability to function.

What would you guys do in my situation?

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Comments (8)

Mar 10, 2018

shut up you sook

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Mar 11, 2018
trenbolone:

shut up you sook

Dude - I wouldn't be bothered if this was one week out of a month but this is every day.

And your response is exactly what I'm doing right now.

Best Response
Mar 11, 2018

Ian, Unfortunate for you that your boss is a workaholic if you feel compelled to have to stay as long as he does. Perhaps find the right time and approach your boss about what his expectations are regarding your average workday. Explain that you want to be a good employee and are willing to work the necessary hours, but that your understanding of the position was that you would be required to work for x to y, M - F, unless there were extenuating circumstances.

The workforce, and subsequently, hiring managers, are having to address the needs of their companies by trying to account for the desires of the younger generation of workers, who apparently are not willing to make the same type of sacrifices that previous generations have made. In fact, I recently took a position to get back into my previous profession (as an electrical department manager for an engineering firm). When the CEO and I sat down to discuss comp, he stated that the workforce of today simply will not allow for the same restrictions that companies used to place on their workers.

I was not given any vacation time because I have carte blanche' to take time as I need it. He stated that the workforce of today will not stand for regimented schedules, no free time, too much stress, etc. etc. We are in a different world than when I entered the workforce 35 years ago.

So that was a long-winded way of saying that I might suggest you consider what is important to you. If working fewer hours, going to the gym during work, or whatever it is that you feel you're not getting to do while are can, ask yourself if it is important enough to go elsewhere. The job market has not been tighter in my lifetime, perhaps since unemployment has been tracked. And considering you're just starting out, you are obviously still young.

Point is, life is short. If you cannot step back and view the position from a different angle, if you can't come to the conclusion that working the extra hours with your boss may be something that springboards you over the guys who are bagging it at 4:30 while you're there another 4 - 6 hours, then get the hell out of there. Can't see another time where jobs will be this plentiful (and many are well-paying jobs). And, take it from someone who probably has decades on you, I can speak from experience that there are few things in life that makes a person more miserable than having a job they hate. It eventually permeates every aspect of your life.

Money is important, but it is a means to an end. Find a job you enjoy, do an exceptional job at it and go the extra mile. You will get noticed and it will make a difference. When we're young, we want it and we want it right now. Learning to be patient and analytical about yourself is a lifelong venture for most of us, but one well-worth the trip.

Good luck. To answer your question about what would I do, well that's pretty simple. Unless you're tied to the position b/c of extenuating circumstances that obligate you to stay there, if you're not happy, get that cv polished up and get your name back out there. Literally, I'm telling you from experience, time waits for no man (or woman). Being miserable in a job takes a major toll on a person after a period of time. Trust me on that one. And once you find yourself in a toxic situation, it is hard to extricate yourself.

Just keep trudging forward, but don't do it with your head in the sand. Start making a plan or exit strategy, as it is always easier to find a job when you have a job. I wish you well.

    • 5
Mar 11, 2018

Leaving would be the easy way out. I like the place and think the same opportunities would be hard to come by elsewhere.

Think I'm being misunderstood - I actually don't mind working these hours because they are **appropriate **for the role and the firm. However, 80% of the division are free-riding and that is pissing me off.

dm100:

Ian, Unfortunate for you that your boss is a workaholic if you feel compelled to have to stay as long as he does. Perhaps find the right time and approach your boss about what his expectations are regarding your average workday. Explain that you want to be a good employee and are willing to work the necessary hours, but that your understanding of the position was that you would be required to work for x to y, M - F, unless there were extenuating circumstances.

The workforce, and subsequently, hiring managers, are having to address the needs of their companies by trying to account for the desires of the younger generation of workers, who apparently are not willing to make the same type of sacrifices that previous generations have made. In fact, I recently took a position to get back into my previous profession (as an electrical department manager for an engineering firm). When the CEO and I sat down to discuss comp, he stated that the workforce of today simply will not allow for the same restrictions that companies used to place on their workers.

I was not given any vacation time because I have carte blanche' to take time as I need it. He stated that the workforce of today will not stand for regimented schedules, no free time, too much stress, etc. etc. We are in a different world than when I entered the workforce 35 years ago.

So that was a long-winded way of saying that I might suggest you consider what is important to you. If working fewer hours, going to the gym during work, or whatever it is that you feel you're not getting to do while are can, ask yourself if it is important enough to go elsewhere. The job market has not been tighter in my lifetime, perhaps since unemployment has been tracked. And considering you're just starting out, you are obviously still young.

Point is, life is short. If you cannot step back and view the position from a different angle, if you can't come to the conclusion that working the extra hours with your boss may be something that springboards you over the guys who are bagging it at 4:30 while you're there another 4 - 6 hours, then get the hell out of there. Can't see another time where jobs will be this plentiful (and many are well-paying jobs). And, take it from someone who probably has decades on you, I can speak from experience that there are few things in life that makes a person more miserable than having a job they hate. It eventually permeates every aspect of your life.

Money is important, but it is a means to an end. Find a job you enjoy, do an exceptional job at it and go the extra mile. You will get noticed and it will make a difference. When we're young, we want it and we want it right now. Learning to be patient and analytical about yourself is a lifelong venture for most of us, but one well-worth the trip.

Good luck. To answer your question about what would I do, well that's pretty simple. Unless you're tied to the position b/c of extenuating circumstances that obligate you to stay there, if you're not happy, get that cv polished up and get your name back out there. Literally, I'm telling you from experience, time waits for no man (or woman). Being miserable in a job takes a major toll on a person after a period of time. Trust me on that one. And once you find yourself in a toxic situation, it is hard to extricate yourself.

Just keep trudging forward, but don't do it with your head in the sand. Start making a plan or exit strategy, as it is always easier to find a job when you have a job. I wish you well.

Mar 11, 2018
ian88:

Leaving would be the easy way out. I like the place and think the same opportunities would be hard to come by elsewhere.

Think I'm being misunderstood - I actually don't mind working these hours because they are **appropriate **for the role and the firm. However, 80% of the division are free-riding and that is pissing me off.

dm100:

Ian, Unfortunate for you that your boss is a workaholic if you feel compelled to have to stay as long as he does. Perhaps find the right time and approach your boss about what his expectations are regarding your average workday. Explain that you want to be a good employee and are willing to work the necessary hours, but that your understanding of the position was that you would be required to work for x to y, M - F, unless there were extenuating circumstances.

The workforce, and subsequently, hiring managers, are having to address the needs of their companies by trying to account for the desires of the younger generation of workers, who apparently are not willing to make the same type of sacrifices that previous generations have made. In fact, I recently took a position to get back into my previous profession (as an electrical department manager for an engineering firm). When the CEO and I sat down to discuss comp, he stated that the workforce of today simply will not allow for the same restrictions that companies used to place on their workers.

I was not given any vacation time because I have carte blanche' to take time as I need it. He stated that the workforce of today will not stand for regimented schedules, no free time, too much stress, etc. etc. We are in a different world than when I entered the workforce 35 years ago.

So that was a long-winded way of saying that I might suggest you consider what is important to you. If working fewer hours, going to the gym during work, or whatever it is that you feel you're not getting to do while are can, ask yourself if it is important enough to go elsewhere. The job market has not been tighter in my lifetime, perhaps since unemployment has been tracked. And considering you're just starting out, you are obviously still young.

Point is, life is short. If you cannot step back and view the position from a different angle, if you can't come to the conclusion that working the extra hours with your boss may be something that springboards you over the guys who are bagging it at 4:30 while you're there another 4 - 6 hours, then get the hell out of there. Can't see another time where jobs will be this plentiful (and many are well-paying jobs). And, take it from someone who probably has decades on you, I can speak from experience that there are few things in life that makes a person more miserable than having a job they hate. It eventually permeates every aspect of your life.

Money is important, but it is a means to an end. Find a job you enjoy, do an exceptional job at it and go the extra mile. You will get noticed and it will make a difference. When we're young, we want it and we want it right now. Learning to be patient and analytical about yourself is a lifelong venture for most of us, but one well-worth the trip.

Good luck. To answer your question about what would I do, well that's pretty simple. Unless you're tied to the position b/c of extenuating circumstances that obligate you to stay there, if you're not happy, get that cv polished up and get your name back out there. Literally, I'm telling you from experience, time waits for no man (or woman). Being miserable in a job takes a major toll on a person after a period of time. Trust me on that one. And once you find yourself in a toxic situation, it is hard to extricate yourself.

Just keep trudging forward, but don't do it with your head in the sand. Start making a plan or exit strategy, as it is always easier to find a job when you have a job. I wish you well.

Then go talk to your boss. I'm sure he's just as pissed that others are half assing their efforts at the firm. If he can make it worth your while in comp, then stay. If he has no control over your comp, then leave. If he doesn't even notice that you're putting in 50-100% more hours than others, then you are probably not appreciated.

    • 5
Mar 11, 2018

I've had the same issue throughout my career. Regardless of the field you're in, there will always be someone, or some group, that will take advantage of the same situation that you feel blessed to have. It's perfectly understandable to be pissed at slack-ass, do-nothing, waste-of-spaces, but there is precisely zero that you can do about it other than to discuss it with your current boss, who obviously has the appropriate work ethic for you to base your future on.

I've realized over time that I fare much better if I do not get involved in office politics, do not point fingers at associates, but rather just bare down and do your job to the best of your abilities. If your organization has any management worth their weight in salt, it won't take long to separate the wheat from the chaff. Chaff will be getting escorted out the door while you're climbing the ladder.

Incompetence and laziness have become pervasive in many areas of our workforce.

    • 1
Mar 11, 2018

What group is This?

    • 1
Mar 11, 2018

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