What does it feel like working 40-hour weeks?

Pizz's picture
Rank: King Kong | banana points 1,213

Working 55-60 hour weeks every week of the year has made me forget what it feels like having a 9-5 job. So those who do, what does it feel like?

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Comments (115)

Oct 5, 2018

grass is always greener. I went from 80 hour weeks to ~50 hour weeks. now im bored and feel like i lost an edge that i knew i had, not only in my industry but just a general sharpness. funny thing is my new job is 'better' and people i talk to think I'm the smart one and people at my old job are the dumb ones when in actuality the opposite is true.

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Oct 5, 2018
itsanumbersgame:

grass is always greener.

So true

Oct 7, 2018
itsanumbersgame:

grass is always greener. I went from 80 hour weeks to ~50 hour weeks. now im bored and feel like i lost an edge that i knew i had, not only in my industry but just a general sharpness. funny thing is my new job is 'better' and people i talk to think I'm the smart one and people at my old job are the dumb ones when in actuality the opposite is true.

So you're saying that ... it's a numbers game...

lol

"If you always put limits on everything you do, physical or anything else, it will spread into your work and into your life. There are no limits. There are only plateaus, and you must not stay there, you must go beyond them." - Bruce Lee

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Oct 5, 2018

40 feels awful coming from working 60 to 90 a week. You lose your sense of purpose; next thing you know, you looking for stimulants in the wrong places.

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Oct 6, 2018

So fucking true.

My advice to anyone who works less than 40 hours per week without kids and any responsibilities is to start a venture on the side.
Or to use the spare time to find something inside of yourself that needs working on and just work on it like a man possessed.

I work less than 40 hours a week but I have a very prestigious job (sounds like an oxymoron, I know) and I love what I do but the hours outside of work can drag on if you spend your whole time binge watching TV.

So I started a side venture. Plus I really want to use this opportunity to really work on myself. There is so much shit and trauma that I have ben carrying and this is an opportunity to work on optimising myself and develop myself. I try and read a book a week,

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Oct 6, 2018

Just curious, are you in the medical field?

Oct 6, 2018

No, not on the medical field.
Not on finance either.
I'm not gonna say what field as I don't want to give myself away .

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Oct 8, 2018

What industry though?

Oct 9, 2018

My guess is it's a government position. Not in finance, but still a prestigious job.

Oct 9, 2018

I know what field you are in...the soccer field and you play for Manchester City.

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Oct 12, 2018

how is saying what industry you are in going to give away your whole identity...like wtf?

hyper paranoia

Oct 13, 2018
Sergioaguero:

No, not on the medical field.
Not on finance either.
I'm not gonna say what field as I don't want to give myself away .

Because giving away your field reveals your identity? How did this moron get into a prestigious field? Oh, it's prestigious in his own eyes.

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Oct 9, 2018

This is why I do like 40 hours a week.

I am all about the side venture. I did crypto trading/mining and sold my coins and equipment before the bubble burst. Now I am focused on other things.

Oct 9, 2018

Haha, true indeed

Oct 9, 2018

literally experiencing that right now. started new job less hours a few months ago.

Oct 5, 2018

Twats.

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Oct 5, 2018

It's great. With that said, I'd rather work 10 hours a day Mon - Thu, and have a solid 3 day weekend.

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Oct 8, 2018

I'd be fine working 8am-9pm Monday-Thursday to have every Friday off.

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Oct 9, 2018

Hilarious, but I can understand that

Oct 10, 2018

I've done this. It is awesome.

Oct 5, 2018

Boring.

Oct 5, 2018

Don't understand how you "lose your purpose" because you're only putting in 40 hours a week instead of 80. Time to find a hobby..

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Oct 6, 2018

Yeah man, I feel like I regained my fucking life when I quit mine last year. Disassociate your identity with this chimp shit

heister:

Look at all these wannabe richies hating on an expensive salad.

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Oct 9, 2018

so true

Oct 11, 2018

true dat

Oct 5, 2018

You people are losers.

I'm contracted to work 38 hours a week. In actuality I am prob there for like 33 hours a week and in that time the actual work I do is maybe 30% of that time. I love it.

I have other pursuits and have a business making 3 times what slaving away for someone else does (although as shown above I don't really slave but stuck in an office all day is lame).

Get a life. I dunno go on a date or something - you may just find you like pussy.

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Oct 6, 2018

I like your sentiment. I'm still in fin atm but no shortage of 'life' pursuits I want to do once I leave.
If you feel like you have no purpose because you're not working all the time, something isn't going right

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Oct 6, 2018

So they're losers. Meanwhile, you're still stuck in an office while running a business making 3X your salary? The fuck?

heister:

Look at all these wannabe richies hating on an expensive salad.

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Oct 7, 2018
GoldenCinderblock:

So they're losers. Meanwhile, you're still stuck in an office while running a business making 3X your salary? The fuck?

hahahaha that's the first thing I thought too

hahahaha I can't stop laughing

"If you always put limits on everything you do, physical or anything else, it will spread into your work and into your life. There are no limits. There are only plateaus, and you must not stay there, you must go beyond them." - Bruce Lee

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Oct 8, 2018
GoldenCinderblock:

So they're losers. Meanwhile, you're still stuck in an office while running a business making 3X your salary? The fuck?

Yea I shit you not bro. I'm trying to save $1mil outright do I can but a house outright. Saves like 400k in the last 2 years so eat shit.

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Oct 9, 2018

Sure

Oct 9, 2018

You don't know shit about personal finance. And I have a few houses. So I invite you to my table to share in the shit meal.

heister:

Look at all these wannabe richies hating on an expensive salad.

Oct 13, 2018

You have a few houses? LMAOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO

Oct 13, 2018

Some people have investment properties as well as a primary residence. It's not that uncommon.

heister:

Look at all these wannabe richies hating on an expensive salad.

Oct 13, 2018

Dude, be honest. How much do you make in a year?

Oct 13, 2018

A lot more this year than last and a lot more next year than this year. Probably like $200K as a family this year

heister:

Look at all these wannabe richies hating on an expensive salad.

Oct 13, 2018

$200k as a family, ok....... but how much do YOU make....

Oct 13, 2018

I guess like $140K then because my wife makes $65K. That sounds low, actually. I'll bump it up to $225. Most people who don't do W-2 work look at income MTM. I made like $15K last month and my wife made whatever her check is.

heister:

Look at all these wannabe richies hating on an expensive salad.

Oct 13, 2018

Is your MTM income relatively steady as an investment property manager?

Oct 14, 2018

The property management income is very stable. Plus or minus when we have vacancies or an eviction or shit like that. My personal rental income is very stable too. My broker income is always there but it's very inconsistent in that I could have a very different amount coming in from that every month. My rehab project manager income is pretty stable. We have three jobs shut down right now, for instance, so there's like 30% less work to do. We'll be back up Monday on one of those and a few weeks for the rest.

heister:

Look at all these wannabe richies hating on an expensive salad.

Oct 13, 2018

Dude not everyone lives where a house costs like 50k.

Where I am you're at a median 800k and usually $1m plus for something quality.

So yea if I lived in your shit ass town I could also buy like 8 houses

Oct 14, 2018

I live in Chicago and buy multiunits. My first house cost $270K and I refi'd at $$320K this year. Buying a 7-unit in Bridgeport with a partner soon.

heister:

Look at all these wannabe richies hating on an expensive salad.

Oct 10, 2018

Quit trying so hard man.

Oct 8, 2018

Exult! I wholeheartedly agree with your statement.

Oct 13, 2018

What type of business is are your side ventures if I may ask?

Oct 13, 2018

is this @me?
Old WSO was easier to track

heister:

Look at all these wannabe richies hating on an expensive salad.

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Oct 5, 2018

I remember my first part time job....

Oct 6, 2018

Also, nothing worse than people having a dick-measuring contest over who's spending the most time at work.

"Man, had to stay 10 hours at work, all week, finally a day off!"

"That's nothing bro, I'm putting in 90 hours a week, like real men should"

"You pussy, I literally haven't been home for six days now, I just sleep under the desk and shower at the gym"

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Oct 6, 2018

Unless you're 50+ or are completely financially independent, don't work 40. The minimum you should be working is 50, and anywhere up to 60 is sustainable in the long run

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Oct 6, 2018

yeah man, spend your youth in a cube!

heister:

Look at all these wannabe richies hating on an expensive salad.

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Oct 6, 2018

Spoken by a true RE professional who'll probably never break the 6 figure ceiling

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Oct 6, 2018

Ignore the RE guy. He's just bitter cause no real buyside shops (AM/HF/PE) actually gave him a look

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Oct 6, 2018

6 figure as in annual salary? I already have, but not in salary. And I do it half naked from home.

heister:

Look at all these wannabe richies hating on an expensive salad.

Oct 11, 2018
GoldenCinderblock:

6 figure as in annual salary? I already have, but not in salary. And I do it half naked from home.

You're a cam-girl?

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Oct 12, 2018

investor, property manager, multifamily rehabber, broker
I have to put on pants sometimes, but I try to avoid it.

heister:

Look at all these wannabe richies hating on an expensive salad.

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Oct 6, 2018

Taking shots at a guy for being in RE is a bad way to cover your bad take.

Do you often need to work hard to succeed? Yes
Does that often translate into 50-60+ hour weeks? Yes

However, if you're lucky enough to be successful without the stress and the hours that is just a bonus. It's pretty sad if you cant find something to do with yourself other than work.

Obviously a family changes the game, but I routinely work ~45 hours a week and find that I dont have enough time. Right now I have a pretty good balance of family time and hitting the gym when the kids go to bed, but I'm debating getting my pilot's license and don't really have enough time.

I speak from experience, a job with a lower time requirement is pretty sweet.

twitter: @CorpFin_Guy

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Oct 9, 2018

I worked towards my private pilot's license in Highschool moving into college. Never finished it out completely (probably have like 100 hours left to put in). I gotta say though being up there in your cozy prop plane flying high above everything else on a cloudless day has to be a top 5 feeling ever. Pursue it, you won't regret it. I regret not finishing my license.

Oct 9, 2018

I did the introductory flight a few years ago, it was pretty awesome cruising up there.

If you still have your materials you can self study the written portion. You're only required 40 hours of flight time for private pilot. They say most people need 50-60 hours before they're ready, but if you've put in some time you might be close to ready.

We recently relocated so I pitched it to my wife as a pilots license + airplane and we can use it to fly home, vacations, etc... Unfortunately, with 3 kids the cost of a plane jumps significantly when you need a 6 seater and my wife shot that idea down. I hate the idea of spending $8k on a license and then never using it (because in reality, I'm not going to go rent a plane to fly in a circle for an hour and then come back), but that might be the route I go.

twitter: @CorpFin_Guy

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Oct 9, 2018

You're right. I honestly just threw the 100 hours out there. I looked at my log book and I have about 35 (very sporadic) in-flight hours, mainly practicing touch-and-go's and cruising around a bit. My dad has a single engine prop plane with a few partners (one's an ex mechanic, one is another enthusiast, and another is the ex weapons chief for the air force's F16's. It is a 8 seater (3 back row, 3 front row, pilot / co-pilot). I think they spent like 25k total which isn't bad considering any one of the partners can get the plane if the schedule it ahead of time (they rotate 1 week of the month each is "theirs" and if it isn't in use they'll ask whomever's week it is if they can take it out, works pretty well). My mother refuses to fly with him because "If we crash we're not both dying and leaving the kids orphaned" lol.

Also you never know, you and the wife could definitely rent a plane for the weekend, fly up north for the weekend. My dad and I have even flown out for brunch on Sunday along the east coast.

Oct 9, 2018

Dude....you have access to a plane, that's 50% of the cost of getting the license. There's a good chance that one of the guys is a certified instructor. Even if you dont use them as your primary instructor, get 5-10 hours out of them for free/cheap and you're well on your way.

Sounds like an awesome arrangement, everyone around my current area has partnerships or flights clubs with Cessna 172s, which only seat 4. That doesnt work for any purpose for me other than a hobby (which is still cool).

What kind of plane do they have? I'm generally only familiar with single engine props in my price range. 8 seater would have to be a decent amount larger and a little more complex to fly.

twitter: @CorpFin_Guy

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Oct 10, 2018

Yeah I know, and I was super into it throughout the end of High School. But I went to college about 3 hours away so it wasn't at all possible to continue lessons during college, and I either traveled or worked / interned most summers. Plus putting in 30-40 hours over the course of months to years is way different than flying 40 hours in 2 months and getting the green light from an instructor (the ex weapons chief is an instructor, taught my father, and who I took lessons with. He also has super low rates for an instructor since he still gets paid by the gov. he just teaches as a hobby and enjoys flying with students). Reading that back sounds like a lot of excuses but once my early career grind slows down I'll definitely go back and get it done. (I'm also doing a lot in terms of CFA prep / work / etc, prepping for written portion of VFR license would just be a bit too much to add on right now).

They have a piper Cherokee (don't know the exact model, only seen it once, they just recently bought it last year). And my bad it is a 6 seater (but spacious 6 seater, their old one was a 4 seater but it was tough to get 4 full grown adults into there). Luggage space is always the drawback for single engine props. Dad's currently working on his IFR certification, they'll probably upgrade again after that. (He says he wants to get certified for multi-engine but IIRC for those you have to get certified for a specific plane (there is no multi engine, all encompassing certification the way there is for single engine)).

Oct 10, 2018

That's cool. Life certainly gets in the way, that's my issue too. Also, they're not excuses, they are priorities. If you valued being a pilot as a top priority then you'd do it, if you value being a CFA over being a pilot that's fine (and probably smart).

You certainly don't HAVE to be a pilot, but if you choose to you have an awesome setup. Access to a plane and a good, cheap instructor don't come along every day. A Cherokee is a good plane, it's actually the 6 seater that I'd most likely buy, but at $100k++ plug hangar, maintenance, instruction, repairs, etc..... it gets pretty pricey as a sole owner (hence my envy of your position).

twitter: @CorpFin_Guy

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Oct 10, 2018

Yeah it isn't cheap, especially for a hobby / entertainment / etc (though I guess you could justify it as a tradeoff to a nice sports car later on in your life, my dad was 40 when he got his license, 43 when they bought the plane).

Yeah the argument for getting the license in HS was that having a private pilots license puts you in a very niche subset of individuals (and for college admissions you could spin it as an experience that teaches you critical thinking / making split second decisions / etc). Having the license at 18 / 19 puts you in a pool of MAYBE 300 other kids that age.

You're best bet if you're serious about it would definitely be to find partners for it.

Funniest
Oct 7, 2018

Shut the fuck up about your job in AM already man, good god, no one gives a fuck that you work at PIMCO or Prudential or wherever the fuck you work. Every post you make on this website wreaks of desperation for someone to come by and validate your bad decision to quit IB because you couldn't handle the hours. You may be the most insecure person on this website, and that's saying a lot. Literally your entire existence on this website is solely for the purpose of informing everyone on every thread that you work in Asset Management because you have less hours and you can make over 1MM dollars a year when you're a senior PM one day!!!!! We get it, you're insecure about where you work and want someone to validate your career choices. You even made another account so you can compliment yourself @AFJ9 If I pay you a compliment will you fuck off already?

Sincerely,

A RE professional at a Mega Fund, who makes more money than you and is way less gay.

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Oct 12, 2018

Bro I wish I could give you more bananas this shit is hilarious.

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Oct 10, 2018
therealgekko:

Spoken by a true RE professional who'll probably never break the 6 figure ceiling

Spoken like a classic case of Short-Man Syndrome.

Oct 6, 2018
therealgekko:

Unless you're 50+ or are completely financially independent, don't work 40. The minimum you should be working is 50, and anywhere up to 60 is sustainable in the long run

Meh. People here make it sound like you either make it or you don't. You either bank top figures, or you end up as a pauper.

Truth is that the vast majority of bankers will never make it to the top - or even remotely close to the top - and probably change industries underway. It's easy to be 21 and say "yeah bro, aim for 60 hours 'til you're 50, it'll be worth it in the end"

Then life happens, you get a S.O and children, you start seeing the reality of mid-to-late career trajectories, and get other priorities.

I won't look down on people that value their spare time over work, after all, you only have this life. There's no second tries. There are enough 50 year old twice or thrice-divorced bitter fucks out there to prove that being married to work also comes at a price.

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Oct 6, 2018

Lmao really? Working 50-60 hours a week isn't "married to work." That's 9am-7pm on weekdays and then a couple additional hours on a Sunday. Very sustainable to go out every night (if that's your preference), have time to have dinner with wife/gf/kids, go on dates, have a hobby, hang with friends, etc.

And it's not seven figures or pauper, but there is the ceiling of those who never crack 200k+. It's either banished to that bottom tier or really make it. And yes, I said bottom tier; 200k is nice when you're 25, but not very impressive when you're 40.

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Most Helpful
Oct 6, 2018

If you're 40 and haven't found greater pleasures/meaning in life than work and comparing paychecks, you're a loser.

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Oct 7, 2018

Sure, but when you're 40, working 55 hours a week and pulling 1.5mm vs. making 175k (who may only be working 35-40 hours), yeah, net-net the first guy is way better off

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Oct 7, 2018

All things held equal yeah. Working 55 hours a week and pulling 1.5mm isn't exactly the default alternative for most people working 9-5's though.

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Oct 9, 2018

Wtf are you talking about?? People work their whole careers and don't even crack 6 figures. "Not very impressive when you're 40", do you even hear yourself? Jeez man, gain some perspective.

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Oct 9, 2018

ya lol apparently the US median income household is now $100k+

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Oct 10, 2018

Wealth >>>>>> Income

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Oct 13, 2018

Are you stupid? $200k/year isn't impressive when you're 40?

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Oct 13, 2018

It's really not. That's just basically, you did your MBA at Tuck and then worked for Amazon corporate 12 years ago, now you make 200k

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Oct 13, 2018

Congrats? Not sure what the point of your comment was.

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Oct 15, 2018

You'd be making a shit tonne more than $200k at Amazon corporate.. pretty terrible comparison/example to make.

Oct 6, 2018

This is funny. If you are losing sharpness or purpose coming to a lower working hour job, then it's either your fucking own problem for not taking initiatives and doing meaningful work, or you exited into a shitty job. There are plenty of opportunities with lower hours that don't require you to work countless hours.

Oct 6, 2018

Try not to jerk off more than twice a day.

Oct 6, 2018

If you're working a job where you work 40 hours a week, odds are you're not working on anything too intense or urgent and that's pretty damn boring. I did a 9-5 type internship at a slow-paced property management firm when I was a freshman and it was way shittier than working 50-60 hours a week but actually having stuff to work on. Half the day you're just staring at the clock.

Oct 6, 2018

That's a given. 40 hours of doing next to nothing is pretty terrible, and can feel slower than 50 busy hours.

While in college, I tried (for a very short time) being a bank receptionist. I basically had to sit behind a desk, greet clients - this was a corporate bank - and send them off to the correct people. On a good day, I'd probably meet 20 clients or so. On a shitty day, maybe a handful.

Other than that, the lobby was completely empty. You were not allowed to use your cellphone. Basically 8 hours of staring at the wall, and greeting the same people (bankers that worked there) four times a day. First when they arrived, second and third when they went for lunch, and last when they left.

It was hands down the most boring job I've ever had. And the worst part? The banks get tens to hundreds of applicants on those jobs - as they're usually promoted with some BS like "Are you interested in getting a food inside the world of banking and finance? Apply now!".

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Oct 8, 2018

When you guys are older and / or actually have real skills and talent, you'll realize that it's not about hours, but rather, results. If you could get the same results in half the time, why wouldn't you? If you can't figure out what to do with the free time, that's pretty scary. The ones who "get it" try to figure out how to earn more while working less, not more. Then you get to choose how to spend that extra time. Some choose to apply it back to work and make 2X or 3X. Others volunteer or start new businesses. Others develop deep hobbies, travel, etc. Regardless, why wouldn't you want the choice?

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Oct 8, 2018

35-50 and couldn't ask for anything better. Get home at a decent time then go out or cook dinner for the lady and wrap up the evening with a heavy lift.. I'm more than content. Curious where @thebrofessor falls on this one

Cultivating mass and wealth since '95

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Oct 9, 2018

this is something I rarely think about. I honestly have no idea what my average is. some weeks I'm logged in 7 days in a row, 11-12 hrs a day M-F plus half days Sat & Sun, some weeks I'm working 30 or less hours if I have a golf trip or the surf is pumping. most of the time it's somewhere in between I'd bet not counting off hours emails & client calls (I try to be available when they need me)

bottom line, get your shit done, have your priorities in line, and waste as little time as possible

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Oct 8, 2018

My father was a top executive of Kansas City Life Insurance in the 1970s. His philosophy was that if you can't do your work in 40 hours then you're not working hard enough. That's not true for all jobs, but for most jobs if you can't do your work in 40 it's because you're dicking around.

Right now, I'm working my f*cking ass off doing about 42-43 hours per week. I get a ton of work done.

Oct 10, 2018

That's what I love about the Midwest, that's a great mentality you find a lot out here. OTOH, I'm goofing off on Reddit and WSO at work, I should probably heed your dad's advice.

Oct 9, 2018

Currently at uni: 20 hours of lecture + 20 hours of personal work. Life is not boring, just find a passion on the side to do from 5 pm onward and before going to the office at 9am. For me, I am doing intensive triathlon training. All the free time allowed me gain a competitive level and to compete at the UK Championships.

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Oct 9, 2018

All else equal you should be trying to make more money in less time.

If you feel bored after working 40 hours a week, then you should find a side hustle/hobby/part time degree program or something.

Between friends, girlfriend, sleeping 8 hours a night, going to the gym every day, playing sports, and pursuing my other hobbies--40-50 hours a week is plenty of work.

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Oct 9, 2018

Right on! Here's the thing that many / most will never understand. Work is a thing you do, not a place you go. For those office warriors who claim to log 80+ hours, not doubting you are physically there, but what are you doing? There's no way you are being bottom or top line productive for 80 hours. I doubt you're having that impact for more than 20 hours per week (because most don't).

Here was my day yesterday. Client meeting from 11:30 to 1:30. 2 hours. Opened up a case that will produce 20k up front revenue and 5k trail. The rest of the day was BS. Did I check the markets, make a few calls, take care of some emails? Sure. That's BS too because you could delegate all of that (that's why nurses see you before the doc comes in) but including that crap, add another 1.5 hours. 3.5 hours, 20k with a nice trail. Do that 3 days a week.

Here's the other part. For those 2 hours with a client, you better be "on". That's where results come in.

If it's not contributing to revenue, you're really not working (unless you're in an ops job, but even still, your work should be providing systems that support revenue). Don't confuse time in the office with work. When you learn to break it down that way, you'll start asking, "Why am I wasting all this time in the office when I could be doing X?"

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Oct 9, 2018

It's quite amazing, actually. Plenty of time to workout 4x a week, cook dinner everyday, time for other hobbies etc.

Best part is because I only work 40 hours, the weeks fly by and I don't dread Monday morning like I used to in IB.

You couldn't pay me double to work double the hours. Just not worth it to me... working 60-80 hours on the regular is extremely unhealthy.

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Oct 9, 2018

Awesome. Actually work 1000-1600 on the days I'm at the office. When I'm on a business trip, I book an extra two days if it's a new location. I work non-stop on the days I'm there for work, so I have two days left to explore the city. I don't have a normal schedule, but it's something like this:

Mon, Tue, Wed: 10-4
Thurs, Fri: Work up to Friday night
Sat, Sun: Free/Fly back (leave Saturday night if I'm in EU)

Oct 9, 2018

You get to eat ass the 128 hours you aren't working

Oct 9, 2018

Pretty boring tbh. I work around 45 hours but I would love to be working much more because its typically more demanding roles that require this. Luckily though I am able to fit in a good gym session every day and study for professional qualifications whilst applying for other jobs and fit in martial arts training throughout the week.

Oct 9, 2018

I can't remember the last time I actually worked that much for my day/career job. I bet it'd get boring and I'd feel like a chump making other people money

Oct 9, 2018

Depends on what you do with your time. I personally think the proper equilibrium is a bit higher than 40 hours because I like working and might struggle to meaningfully fill that much free time, but I have friends who work at tech firms where they genuinely work 9-5, and they do awesome stuff outside of work. I also have friends who work 60 in consulting but waste away all of their time doing drugs and watching tv and complain that they have way too much free time. It's all individual and what you make of it.

Oct 9, 2018

In FP&A and do 40-45. It's so boring but I was fortunate enough to land a position on the board of a local nonprofit and spend the remainder of my free time reading about O&G.

Oct 9, 2018

How old are you and how much do you make?

Oct 9, 2018

24 and $55k at a top 20 F500

Oct 10, 2018

Is that 55k all in? Is there any bonus ?

Oct 10, 2018

Yeah and no bonus. Heard one of our Senior Analysts who's been here for about 15 years saying he makes $80k. The firm rarely promotes someone to manager until their late 30s/early 40s.

Oct 10, 2018

are you happy? I guess that's what matters in the end.

Oct 10, 2018

Not at all happy with work but enjoying life outside of it. Huge benefit of it being so slow is I've able to knock out a ton of informational interviews so I think I'll be in good shape to move to a sexier area of finance after a year here

Oct 9, 2018

I use to work in banking and now work in a corporate gig. The biggest thing I've found is that bankers coming to corporate can't stop chasing the carrot, everyone still wants to be a BSD and get validation. It's like everyone forgot that they only did banking so they could "chill" throughout the rest of their lives. I blame shows like Billions for making all these people think they can all be hot shot hedge fund managers.

Newsflash: Most people in banking will revert to the mean. I'm sorry, it's just life.

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Oct 9, 2018

For me, not so much about the amount of hours, but it's the flexibility. Within reason, I can come and go based on my schedule, have 25 days off, can work from home no problem if calendar permits, and have a significant amount of autonomy. The balance is really great, esp when you start to factor in expanding the family

Oct 10, 2018
Poff:

For me, not so much about the amount of hours, but it's the flexibility. Within reason, I can come and go based on my schedule, have 25 days off, can work from home no problem if calendar permits, and have a significant amount of autonomy. The balance is really great, esp when you start to factor in expanding the family

Great points... I thinking Working From Home is one of the most underrated benefits out there. Before I started working on this "special project" at my bank, I could WFH once a week. Man... the weeks went by SO MUCH quicker... counting down the days until I can do it again.

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Oct 10, 2018

Agreed...I'd rather work 50 hours and have lots of flexibility than work 40 hours with no flexibility. That's once of the nice things about (many areas of) consulting. If you don't need to be on client site, people tend not to care where you are as long as your work gets done.

Oct 10, 2018

probably feels pretty nice, but I'd never know

Oct 10, 2018

I just left a job where I was working 35-40 hours a week (35 w/summer Fridays, 40 rest of the year). Worst week I ever had was ~45 hours. I don't think you can judge a job based solely on the hours alone. Personally, I'd love to always work 35-40 hours a week. I have a very active social and personal life and always found ways to make use of the extra time, be it gym, reading, dates, dinners, TV, beers with friends, etc. From that perspective, it was fucking awesome. However, a lot of jobs that provide that kind of work week lack other things like challenge, upside, and intellectual stimulation. My perfect job would be one where I was mentally stimulated, was rewarded for high performance, and still got me out by 5/530 with no weekend work. Those are very hard to find, so I ended up moving to a new job with slightly longer hours (45-50 per week and more travel) because it compensates for that in other ways.

Oct 10, 2018
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Oct 11, 2018
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Oct 13, 2018

No pain no game.

Oct 15, 2018