2/11/13

Hi Everyone,

I am a CFA Level 3 candidate and have been a finance professional for the last 4.5 years, though most of the work I've done is in a Financial Back office.My future aspirations include working in Investment Management, but I'm more intrigued by the world of Fixed Income and Structured Products.

I had the following questions,
1. How would an MBA help me in an Asset Management role?
2. Which are the B Schools that are considered good for getting into an Investment Management type of role?
3. What kind of roles in Investment Management (or Fixed Income Management) can one look at after an MBA+CFA?

I know that prior experience counts, but thats the reason I want to use an MBA to make a transition in my financial career.

Hope to find some helpful suggestions :)

Comments (10)

2/11/13

You are joined by the hordes of back office guys with a CFA (or close to it) looking to make the leap to front office. An MBA is your gateway to a recruiting pool so choose the school wisely. Tuck, Sloan, CBS, Wharton, Booth. These are the best schools if you want buy side research. Toss in Stern for sell side. HBS and Stanford guys and gals always have a shot but they are not finance focused schoos. Go outside of these schools at your own peril. You basically need to get a firm to give you a shot via on campus recruiting or get lucky with alumni.

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2/11/13

Thanks for the advice. I am not someone who can get into any of the above mentioned schools. So I might have to take a shot outside those at my own peril :) Is there any alternative way or career path which might lead to Fixed Income Management after CFA?

2/11/13

If you want to work in structured products/FI I would suggest getting a job at one of the ratings agencies to get some FO experience. I know the ratings agencies get a bad rep but at least its FO and it does provide a good spring board onto the buy side. The pay isn't great but the hours are good and you might be able to get the job you want without the cost of an MBA. Obviously, if you get into an M7 MBA disregard my advice.

2/11/13

@Ovechkin08.. Thanks for the reply. I like the way you're looking at it. Guess I'll have to try my luck after CFA to see if I can get a foot inside the door.

2/11/13

CFA + doing my MBA top15 in the North East. Still very difficult to get into the buyside, the CFA will get you some interviews. In the end, they want to see if you live and breathe stocks. Sometimes the technical's are very simple, but have never been covered in CFA. Some of the questions asked are what you would naturally know from doing lots and lots of research on equities.

2/11/13

Sylverlee:
CFA + doing my MBA top15 in the North East. Still very difficult to get into the buyside, the CFA will get you some interviews. In the end, they want to see if you live and breathe stocks. Sometimes the technical's are very simple, but have never been covered in CFA. Some of the questions asked are what you would naturally know from doing lots and lots of research on equities.

Doesn't get a lot of talk on these boards but the CMT (chartered market technician) would be helpful for this. Doesn't get the recognition of the CFA, but knowledge wise you should be able to talk about the technicals of any security and sound like you've traded before. Also find the things learned very applicable if you trade anything, even you PA. Know others in fixed income with a CFA and honestly 95% of it doesn't apply at all, where I use things learned in the CMT on a daily basis.

2/11/13

DChedge:
Doesn't get a lot of talk on these boards but the CMT (chartered market technician) would be helpful for this. Doesn't get the recognition of the CFA, but knowledge wise you should be able to talk about the technicals of any security and sound like you've traded before. Also find the things learned very applicable if you trade anything, even you PA. Know others in fixed income with a CFA and honestly 95% of it doesn't apply at all, where I use things learned in the CMT on a daily basis.

I'm a big fan of technicals myself but wouldn't bringing up technicals have just as good of a chance of getting you laughed out of the interview? I obviously don't have any first-hand experience but from what I've read, there is still an enormous stigma surrounding TA. Aren't these skills used at only niche firms?

2/11/13

Brouhaha:
DChedge:
Doesn't get a lot of talk on these boards but the CMT (chartered market technician) would be helpful for this. Doesn't get the recognition of the CFA, but knowledge wise you should be able to talk about the technicals of any security and sound like you've traded before. Also find the things learned very applicable if you trade anything, even you PA. Know others in fixed income with a CFA and honestly 95% of it doesn't apply at all, where I use things learned in the CMT on a daily basis.

I'm a big fan of technicals myself but wouldn't bringing up technicals have just as good of a chance of getting you laughed out of the interview? I obviously don't have any first-hand experience but from what I've read, there is still an enormous stigma surrounding TA. Aren't these skills used at only niche firms?

I guess I misread the question. Wouldn't recommend bringing up TA in an interview unless asked, but to people looking for FO roles in trading, I think it is extremely practical to know TA. Even places that don't use them for trading strategies should still be familiar with them if they don't want to be at a disadvantage. Just saying that for FO trading roles, I personally think that something like the CMT is more useful than the CFA.

3/25/13

Depends on what kind of shop you're applying to. I could see how the CMT could help someone recruiting for S&T. The CMT wouldn't have helped me for any of the equity shops I applied at. For the most part, they're all bottoms up fundamental.

2/11/13
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