What Is Arbitrage?

Patrick Curtis

Reviewed by

Patrick Curtis WSO Editorial Board

Expertise: Investment Banking | Private Equity

Arbitrage is the technique of investing in two assets (going long one and short the other) and assuming that the prices will converge over time. This is made possible as a result of market inefficiencies, although as technology advances more and more these inefficiencies are likely to be smaller and to be eliminated faster.

True arbitrage is meant to be risk free profit but in reality it very very rarely is. Due to the fact that any profit from arbitrage is likely to be small, traders and investors will put in vast amounts of money to magnify returns.

The most famous example of arbitrage is that of Long Term Capital Management, the quant-based hedge fund which started off selling new US government bonds and buying older ones, and taking the profits as the prices converged. Hedge funds which operate an event driven strategy will often work on the basis of merger arbitrage, i.e. that the stock prices of companies will converge if they complete a merger deal.

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Patrick Curtis

Patrick Curtis is a member of WSO Editorial Board which helps ensure the accuracy of content across top articles on Wall Street Oasis. He has experience in investment banking at Rothschild and private equity at Tailwind Capital along with an MBA from the Wharton School of Business. He is also the founder and current CEO of Wall Street Oasis. This content was originally created by member WallStreetOasis.com and has evolved with the help of our mentors.