Experienced HF analyst resume format

Hey Team WSO-anyone have a sample resume or resume template for an experienced analyst? I want to make sure I keep mine up to date, but I haven't really considered how to structure it.

I previously worked in a transaction-oriented Big 4 consulting group, so I structured my resume like a banking analyst with transaction details (size, industry, etc).

I was considering using a banker template but am curious if there's any other routes to take.

Has anyone gone through the lateral-hire process at a fairly junior hedge fund employee?

 

Curious to know as well. From what ive seen junior guys stay pretty high level and go into individual performance during interviews. The more senior guys dont pick out specific stocks, but usually bullet pt performance yearly

 
Best Response

I do... and when I was searching and not getting much luck, I made that change to my resume and immediately got more hits, leading to my current job.

Your point about the boilerplate of HF resumes is spot on - there's very little that potential employers get from reading your resume. Hopefully you have a good academic background, but if you don't have experience at a known HF, it all looks the same.

As an example, on my resume I put a trade example that highlighted the proprietary research that I did (I forget the wording exactly...):

Uncovered bearish data on XYZ through calls to dealers while consensus remained bullish * Spoke regularly with a network of 20 dealers on current trends * Identified that in Q2 order trends began to deteriorate which provided risk to yearly estimates * Initiated short position which generated x% return over 6 months; exited as consensus estimates were more inline with actual trends

I think it helps demonstrate your capabilities and how you can generate alpha for the firm. Certainly much better than saying: "I monitor current and prospective investments".

I have two "Selected Investments" on my resume. My advice would be to include the most controversial trade where you did differentiated work to prove your thesis, and were proven right. I wouldn't say "Shorted XYZ in 2008, fundamentals got worse and made money".

Downside: it amplifies your style to some degree, which might prove to not be a good fit with a potential employer. Obviously if it wasn't going to be a fit, it wasn't going to be a fit, but you are more boxed in when you get to an interview and they say "we use a quant screen and focus solely on public filings for LT investments and don't do channel checks".

 
grosse:
I do... and when I was searching and not getting much luck, I made that change to my resume and immediately got more hits, leading to my current job.

Your point about the boilerplate of HF resumes is spot on - there's very little that potential employers get from reading your resume. Hopefully you have a good academic background, but if you don't have experience at a known HF, it all looks the same.

As an example, on my resume I put a trade example that highlighted the proprietary research that I did (I forget the wording exactly...):

Uncovered bearish data on XYZ through calls to dealers while consensus remained bullish * Spoke regularly with a network of 20 dealers on current trends * Identified that in Q2 order trends began to deteriorate which provided risk to yearly estimates * Initiated short position which generated x% return over 6 months; exited as consensus estimates were more inline with actual trends

I think it helps demonstrate your capabilities and how you can generate alpha for the firm. Certainly much better than saying: "I monitor current and prospective investments".

I have two "Selected Investments" on my resume. My advice would be to include the most controversial trade where you did differentiated work to prove your thesis, and were proven right. I wouldn't say "Shorted XYZ in 2008, fundamentals got worse and made money".

Downside: it amplifies your style to some degree, which might prove to not be a good fit with a potential employer. Obviously if it wasn't going to be a fit, it wasn't going to be a fit, but you are more boxed in when you get to an interview and they say "we use a quant screen and focus solely on public filings for LT investments and don't do channel checks".

Just curious, is it common for some funds to not use channel checks? I don't quite see the harm in it and the upside can be exponential...does the concern center around insider trading possibilities?

 

I don't think THAT many funds use channel checks.

1) They are difficult to develop 2) They can be time consuming 3) If you run a highly-diversified fund, the upside can't be "exponential"

Follow me on Twitter: https://twitter.com/_KarateBoy_
 
KarateBoy:
I don't think THAT many funds use channel checks.

1) They are difficult to develop 2) They can be time consuming 3) If you run a highly-diversified fund, the upside can't be "exponential"

4) When you spend a lot of time focused on an industry or company through time consuming channel checks, you feel like you NEED to be invested, long or short, even if what you are hearing isn't out of consensus. That's obviously the wrong way to go about investing.

To theworks9 question: I think proprietary research / channel checks has become a lot harder because of highly publicized insider trading cases and bad behavior from the expert network firms. It's a lot harder to get someone to share information if they've heard about these cases and then someone from a hedge fund calls and is trying to triangulate which way earnings are headed.

But back to the point of the thread - painting a picture on your resume as to how you can add value is the way to go.

 

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