Need Help: MIT MFIN or work then MBA?

Hi, I am about to graduate from my university.

Recently got MIT MFIN and fixed income strategy intern at an IB.

I do not know whether I should go to MFIN first or try to get full time offer after the intern, and then go for MBA? I do not mind spending time doing both, but they are just too expensive....

I know MFIN or MBA really depends on your career choice. Right now I am quite interested in research/strategy and portfolio mgt. But I do not know whether things will change over the years,and I do see a lot of ppl working in AM have MBA.

Thanks for help!

 
Best Response

Here's what you do. You take the MFIN offer and you take the internship. You work over the summer, and try to get a full time offer. If you like what you're doing in your internship, and they make you a full-time offer to start immediately, do it. Otherwise, go to MIT. It's a great program, and this way, you'll have some work experience on your CV.

Even if you do get a full-time offer to start immediately, you should try to defer your MIT admission for a year or two. There is no assurance that you'll ever get in again. And this way, if things are going badly in a year, or you don't like what you're doing, or you need a master's degree to advance in your field (which is pretty much required in fixed income strategy), you have an easy out to a great program.

If you want to be a portfolio manager, an MFIN from MIT trumps an MBA from anywhere. MBA programs do not teach half as much finance theory as MIT's MFIN program.

 
brotherbear:
Here's what you do. You take the MFIN offer and you take the internship. You work over the summer, and try to get a full time offer. If you like what you're doing in your internship, and they make you a full-time offer to start immediately, do it. Otherwise, go to MIT. It's a great program, and this way, you'll have some work experience on your CV.

Even if you do get a full-time offer to start immediately, you should try to defer your MIT admission for a year or two. There is no assurance that you'll ever get in again. And this way, if things are going badly in a year, or you don't like what you're doing, or you need a master's degree to advance in your field (which is pretty much required in fixed income strategy), you have an easy out to a great program.

If you want to be a portfolio manager, an MFIN from MIT trumps an MBA from anywhere. MBA programs do not teach half as much finance theory as MIT's MFIN program.

I disagree with your last paragraph. Master's programs in finance tend to be heavily geared towards those who want to do trading, quant strategies, algorithmic trading, etc. For investment management, fundamental research, etc., an MBA from a top school (HBS/Wharton/Booth/Stanford/Columbia) goes further in terms of allowing one to break into the field. For example, at a place like wharton or booth, you will have access to most of the elite buyside firms through on-campus recruiting and company presentations.

 
Brady4MVP:
brotherbear:
Here's what you do. You take the MFIN offer and you take the internship. You work over the summer, and try to get a full time offer. If you like what you're doing in your internship, and they make you a full-time offer to start immediately, do it. Otherwise, go to MIT. It's a great program, and this way, you'll have some work experience on your CV.

Even if you do get a full-time offer to start immediately, you should try to defer your MIT admission for a year or two. There is no assurance that you'll ever get in again. And this way, if things are going badly in a year, or you don't like what you're doing, or you need a master's degree to advance in your field (which is pretty much required in fixed income strategy), you have an easy out to a great program.

If you want to be a portfolio manager, an MFIN from MIT trumps an MBA from anywhere. MBA programs do not teach half as much finance theory as MIT's MFIN program.

I disagree with your last paragraph. Master's programs in finance tend to be heavily geared towards those who want to do trading, quant strategies, algorithmic trading, etc. For investment management, fundamental research, etc., an MBA from a top school (HBS/Wharton/Booth/Stanford/Columbia) goes further in terms of allowing one to break into the field. For example, at a place like wharton or booth, you will have access to most of the elite buyside firms through on-campus recruiting and company presentations.

You can learn fundamentals at MIT MFIN... Don't know much about Princeton MFIN though.

 

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