Bad Co-Worker (How to handle)

Hi everyone! So i have an issue at work that is officially grinding my gears. That is the new hiring of an analyst at my work. How am I supposed to handle an employee who is obnoxiously loud, asks a million questions at her job. It doesnt seem like she tries to figure anything out.

The problem is that we are the same title although I have seniority, and find it unfair that she as an analyst gets in late leaves early, and talks all the time mostly to herself and her dog at the office. Lastly she takes personal calls in the office on her lunch break and we are in a WeWork space where it is not very large. This is not a big office setting, and do not want to be passive aggressive or start anything at the office.

Comments (10)

Sep 13, 2019

tell mgmt, cold shoulder, wait for her to get fired. Unproductive people won't last long unless family

Most Helpful
Sep 13, 2019

1) Obnoxiously loud - I suggest having a quiet word with her and just mentioning that sometimes her volume is inappropriate for an indoor workspace. Providing you're polite and civil about it, I'm sure she'll take it as the friendly advice it's intended as rather than any sort of belittlement / bullying.

2) Asks a million questions - I don't know with what level of experience she's coming in as, however I can sympathise with asking a lot of questions off the bat: she's likely unfamiliar with your company's systems, and so needs help navigating your in-house platforms, and is also trying to get a feel for how exactly management likes work to be presented, etc. I'd give this a little more time and hopefully it should die down eventually.

3) Same title - annoying, but little you can do about this in the short term. Keep working hard and, as the "senior", I'm sure you'll get promoted above your colleague soon.

4) Gets in late / leaves early - if it's really annoying you, again, have a quiet word. That said, if she's able to perform at the requisite level with her current hours work, this shouldn't really be a problem. If you don't want to mention it to her and she's not pulling her weight, I'm sure management will notice soon enough.

5) Talks mostly to herself / her office dog - quiet word...

I'm sure you're getting the theme here. Now, you may deem a quiet, friendly word as "passive aggressive," but I do not: if you want to see changes in your colleague, you need to make the change. Initially, I'd suggest doing this directly and in good faith - she may well come to appreciate it down the line and an extra ally is always worthwhile (generally no matter who they are). If this fails, mention it to your supervisor: if you have the same supervisor, then happy days; failing that, likely your supervisor will have a word with hers, etc.

    • 4
Sep 13, 2019

"Gets in late and leaves early" is very vague..
Can you provide a specific arrival and departure time on a typical day?

Sep 13, 2019

I think YoungDumbFullofRum's comments above are spot on, and I do not disagree with them. However, I personally wouldn't have a "quiet word" with a peer in this type of situation so I'll offer a different persepctive:

I would put my head down and work until I have title seniority and am certain that I am the favored analyst. You very well may be certain of that now, I don't know because it hasn't been mentioned, but navigating a company politically can be complicated. Some may disagree with me on this, but I wouldn't want to provide a peer with any sort of edge whatsoever until I am positive I am to be given formal seniority. Based on what you've outlined, you basically want this individual to completely change how she presents herself in the office, which has a real possibility of being taken personally. Again, I don't think there's anything wrong with offering constructive criticism, but I am usually cautious about doing so with peers in case this person doesn't welcome your comments and presents an embellished version of events to HR villainizing you. Since you're at a WeWork facility you may be with a smaller firm, again not sure, but this sort of situation backfires all the time in corporate America.

You're obviously annoyed and I get that, but personally I'd throw in some headphones and keep grinding. This person is direct competition. If you've been there longer and they don't work as hard, you'll be promoted in no time and will likely be able to have conversations with her direct report and provide feedback that can be reiterated back down.

Additionally, most of what you mentioned will likely be noticed by management if/when they're around. It may even be brought to their attention by others who share the space

    • 2
Sep 13, 2019

I would fire you on the spot if you complained about something as menial as a fucking title. Do NOT waste anyone's time complaining about that.

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Sep 14, 2019

CaSh Me OuTsIDe HoWbOw DaH!
Fight her.

Or you could just directly approach her and tell her what you really feel. Communication is a very important part of a company. Think about a company like Bridgewater associates this issue would have never occurred because of their "radical transparency culture".

Sep 16, 2019

Good advice here from other posters, but if you really want to put a spoke in her wheel with minimal risk, write a tactful note to management explaining you are allergic to her dog and it needs to go.

    • 1
Sep 16, 2019

Dude you work in a WeWork office space..........how serious of a job can you possibly have?

thots and prayers

Sep 16, 2019
CompliConsultant:

Hi everyone! So i have an issue at work that is officially grinding my gears. That is the new hiring of an analyst at my work. How am I supposed to handle an employee who is obnoxiously loud, asks a million questions at her job. It doesnt seem like she tries to figure anything out.

The problem is that we are the same title although I have seniority, and find it unfair that she as an analyst gets in late leaves early, and talks all the time mostly to herself and her dog at the office. Lastly she takes personal calls in the office on her lunch break and we are in a WeWork space where it is not very large. This is not a big office setting, and do not want to be passive aggressive or start anything at the office.

None of this actually seems like a problem. She's new and asks questions which is to be expected - you were probably the same way.

As for the rest of it, it's only an issue if she's not pulling her weight. Maybe she's just a better/more efficient worker than you? Having a life outside the office is totally fine if you get your shit done.

As with so many people looking to stroke their own egos by posting about "bad co-workers" on an online forum, you seem to be looking for validation of your own mediocrity by putting down someone else.

    • 1
Sep 16, 2019
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