Comments (24)

Oct 25, 2015

Wow congrats. McKinsey is the clear choice. Strong exit ops to industry or PE, b-school, etc.

    • 2
Oct 25, 2015
Communist:

Wow congrats. McKinsey is the clear choice. Strong exit ops to industry or PE, b-school, etc.

Bain has much stronger exit ops into PE....

Honestly, based on my friends' MBA summer internship, McKinsey seems to have the worst culture of the three. I'd probably go with BCG, it's very office specific though.

Oct 25, 2015

Sike. Only reason you say that is because of Bain Capital. Also, I doubt that you will have the opportunity to decide between all three

Best Response
Oct 27, 2015

Caveating all of the below with a disclaimer, which is that I work at Bain, so I'm certainly biased. Chose to work there while turning down a McKinsey offer almost two years ago.

Bain Capital has nothing to do with why Bain is a better firm for those interested in PE. McKinsey actually sends as many people to Bain Cap as Bain does (although this is largely because McKinsey is way bigger).

If you really want to go work in private equity, there are a number of reasons why Bain is slightly more conducive to that. Bain is the clear market leader in private equity due diligence work, with McKinsey a distant second, and BCG well behind both. At Bain, you can do a PEG (private equity group) rotation where you spend 6 months doing nothing but private equity consulting, which goes a long way towards making you sound more intelligent during a buy-side interview. You can't do that at McKinsey/BCG because they don't sell enough private equity work. You also wouldn't want to because due diligence work is often a shit show at those firms because they don't have as much expertise in it. Doing a 3-week diligence without any prior experience doing one is pretty rough, and being able to leverage frameworks from previous deals goes a long way towards making a project with short turnaround times a lot more sustainable. Don't believe me? Ask anyone at McKinsey or BCG about doing a diligence project, and at best, you'll get something along the lines of "I'm glad I did it, but I never want to do it again", and at worst, you'll hear "it was the worst experience of my life". At Bain, people love doing PE work, and demand for those projects often exceeds supply from a staffing perspective.

Add all that up and throw in a little self-selection bias, and you end up with way more people from Bain going into private equity than from the other two firms on a %-wise basis. With that said, if you're committed to going to PE, you can certainly do so from McKinsey and BCG as well, so I wouldn't base my decision solely off that.

As far as exit options more broadly, everyone at McKinsey Bain and BCG gets emails every week from the same damn headhunter firms. I went to two recruiting events in the past week, one for a VC fund and one for BizOps with a large tech company, and all three firms were extremely well represented at both. You'll have great opportunities no matter where you go.

Ultimately, the largest driver in your decision process should be where you like the people the best. In the short term, you're going to be spending 5000+ hours over the next two years(conservatively) working with people from whatever firm you choose, so go work with the people that make you feel the most comfortable. Over the long term, your colleagues have the potential to be part of your social and professional network for years to come, so go work with people with whom you really feel excited about that prospect.

    • 2
Oct 26, 2015

Poor reply, anyone saying that there is a clear choice is still a college sophomore dreaming of MBB. All three excel at placement into just about any world. OP, go to the sell weekends and see who you like best from that.

Learn More

2,037 questions across 209 consulting firms. 11 Cases developed by a McKinsey Associate, 10+ hours of video. The WSO Consulting Interview Prep Course has everything you’ll ever need to ace your consulting case interviews. Learn more.

Oct 25, 2015

Which office(s) are the offers for?

Learn More

2,037 questions across 209 consulting firms. 11 Cases developed by a McKinsey Associate, 10+ hours of video. The WSO Consulting Interview Prep Course has everything you’ll ever need to ace your consulting case interviews. Learn more.

Oct 25, 2015

Offers are all for bay area locations.

Oct 25, 2015

Congratz dude! I would say pick the place that has the best gut feeling to you. Honestly stop worrying about prestige or exit options, you are clearly fine. Just pick the company where you can honestly see yourself being happy

Oct 25, 2015

Whoever says there is a clear, right answer has never worked for an MBB. I have and have multiple friends at each firm. Everyone enjoyed their experiences and learned a lot. They are all great.

Bain is a bit frattier and younger (though you are treated more as a true analyst because of the pyramid org structure). At BCG and McKinsey, you get more responsibility earlier and there is little distinction between you and post-mbas. You also travel more than at Bain.

Bain places best into PE, but they all place fine if you want to go that route. All are great for industry. Think about the office, people, industry work and culture. At this point, you should have sell weekends coming up fairly shortly so use that as a chance to get to know everyone and go with the best cultural fit. Can't go wrong. Congrats on the offers.

Oct 26, 2015

They are all going to lead the exact same places, especially for an undergrad. Go where you feel you will be the most successful; which is probably the place where you felt the strongest connection. Just go somewhere quiet, close your eyes, and see which way your minds pulls you.

Or maybe imagine yourself introducing yourself to someone new, and see which introduction makes you feel happiest/proudest/at ease.

    • 1
Oct 27, 2015

If coming from undergrad, realize that Bain has a different model than BCG/McK for undergrads

Other considerations...
- Same city for all 3?
- What region are you in? In some regions, some firms are better. Generally McK will have less weak spots internationally
- What industry/function do you want to serve? Some of the firms have less exposure here, too. I have a friend in an international market at Bain and he struggles to get the deep operations/manufacturing work that he wants there, because his office doesn't do much of that work. Could be just his experience

Oct 25, 2015

What do see the pros/cons of the two models as being?

Oct 27, 2015

In general, for post-undergrad, I think the BCG/McK model is better. Post-undergrad is treated similar to post-MBA. At Bain, I believe there is a bit of a difference between the two, with post-undergrad given a bit less responsibility and use more as "extra horsepower" for doing analysis/making slides/etc.

Hopefully someone will jump in if I am incorrect. :-)

    • 1
Oct 25, 2015
Comment