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Do you hate poor people?

AllDay_028's picture
Rank: Almost Human | 6,656

As much as Donald Trump? In the last week we've seen proposed plans come out of the white house that:

Gut medicaid and limit access to low cost private insurance
Cut low income housing programs
Cut low income food programs
Cut after school and summer programs primarily attended by low income children
Cut training for public school teachers
Cut legal services for the poor

Where is that money going? Well to 50% more drones, a wall, and high income tax cuts.

As someone who is very involved in education programs/non profits around NYC, the thing that sticks out to me the most is that we are essentially taking away as much support as we can from children, which will only serve to decrease social mobility and take away the ability for us to truly be a meritocracy. Without funding for low income education programs, while providing poor children with adequate healthcare and housing, the likelihood of graduating HS/college and obtaining a career (whether through a trade or white collar) drops drastically.

No matter what your party affiliation is, we can all agree that reducing the talent pool and making America less meritocratic is a bad thing. And it's not like we can disguise this as fiscal responsibility, considering the entirety of the proposed spending programs and revenue cuts.

Comments (241)

Mar 16, 2017

This is why Republicans and Democrats both suck. The Republican way is to fuck over a bunch of people, lower taxes by 2% and then build a bunch of new toys for the military that we'll never use. The Democrat plan is to keep spending money ineffectively, create nonsense government programs that do nothing and raise taxes to 60%

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Best Response
Mar 16, 2017
LReed:

This is why Republicans and Democrats both suck. The Republican way is to fuck over a bunch of people, lower taxes by 2% and then build a bunch of new toys for the military that we'll never use. The Democrat plan is to keep spending money ineffectively and raise taxes to 60% instead of closing the nuanced tax loopholes that exist.

All I want is to find someone to allow me to live in a mostly free market economy with limited regulation in most industries (but more intervention in some, like healthcare), while allowing people to have their own choice in terms of sexuality and their bodies, provide a base level of education and Healthcare for all people, and to stop acting like we need to arm ourselves for seventeen world wars.

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Mar 16, 2017

Wish I could give you all the SBs I have. So on point and could not agree more.

    • 1
Mar 16, 2017

lamenting the lack of a utopian society is the biggest waste of time in the world.

I agree with everything you're saying, but a society cannot be perfect if the species that creates it is imperfect.

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Mar 16, 2017

Sounds like the American dream

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Mar 17, 2017

sounds reasonable to me +1

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Mar 17, 2017

sounds like Canada without the taxes ):

    • 1
Mar 22, 2017

You forgot legalize marijuana

    • 1
Oct 11, 2017

You sound young and silly. #moralhazard

    • 1
Nov 2, 2017

Go to Switzerland.

Mar 16, 2017

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Mar 16, 2017

Ever heard of the Crusades?

There is so much wrong with your post that (unlike most times) I am going to quit while i'm ahead.

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Mar 16, 2017

Enlighten me. I'm against all religion, but what some Christians did long ago doesn't matter. Islam is a problem today. Their ideology is incompatible with civilized society.

heister:

Look at all these wannabe richies hating on an expensive salad.

https://arthuxtable.com/

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Mar 16, 2017
BatemanBatemanBateman:

Ever heard of the Crusades?

There is so much wrong with your post that (unlike most times) I am going to quit while i'm ahead.

The Crusades? Seriously? The Crusades were a reaction to Islamists invading North Africa, the Middle East and Europe (not even talking about their invasion of Asia). It wasn't until the early 18th century that the Europeans were able to finally defeat the invading Ottoman Turks. The idea that peaceful Muslims were assaulted by invading hoards of European Christians is a Muslim myth. I've got news for you--Islam was founded in the 7th century AD by a warlord and spread solely through warfare.

Mar 16, 2017

Ever heard of a historical timeline?

Follow the shit your fellow monkeys say @shitWSOsays

Life is hard, it's even harder when you're stupid - John Wayne

    • 1
Mar 16, 2017

Not defending GoldenCinderBlock. But trying to justify modern day events with religious wars 1,000 years ago is ridiculous. I hope your professional analysis is more rigorous

    • 1
Mar 16, 2017
GoldenCinderblock:

I've always had a theory that the vast majority of poor people are just stupid and lazy. My wife is a teacher in the hood and I hear confirmation of this every day. These people reap what they sow for the most part. A large part of the blame rests on culture. I'm only mildly racist, but I'm extremely cultureist. Black ghetto culture is derived from white trash hillbilly culture, but nobody will say anything is wrong with it. But making fun of rednecks is OK. Black ghetto culture is a major problem nationally. Islam is a major problem globally. Pretending that a religion that never went through the Enlightenment and promotes throwing rocks at people until they die is inferior, a problem, and must be dealt with.

I really hope you guys don't remove this because these are my honest thoughts and I'd love to hear a convincing argument to the contrary based in reason and not emotion and the desire to be unquestioningly nice to everyone.

Devil's advocate but have you considered you only work hard because you have relatively defined benefits in exchange for working hard? What if, due to the low minimum wage, after growing up in a poor, uneducated household, taught at an underfunded public school, you were unable to go to college because of family obligations/drags and working hard just meant busting your ass as a janitor or french fry cook and MAYBE making assistant manager @ $12/hr?

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Mar 16, 2017

That sounds nice on paper. That's the exception, not the rule. These people have money for drugs, but no money to send their kids to school with unsoiled clothing. These people have children they can not afford. These people have the most absurd understandings of family structure that I can't begin to understand.

For example, one of my wife's helper people is currently trying to get pregnant with a dude she used to date and who cheated on her and who currently has a girlfriend because she wants a baby. She makes $15/hr. They order pizza and wings daily and weigh 300lbs. That's one of the better ones - one with a job. Rare. I could go on and on. It's a terrible culture. Why has every other ethnicity assimilated? And don't give me any white privilege lines.

heister:

Look at all these wannabe richies hating on an expensive salad.

https://arthuxtable.com/

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Mar 16, 2017

Corey and Trevor don't you know that stealing gas is highly illegal?

    • 2
Mar 16, 2017
GoldenCinderblock:

I've always had a theory that the vast majority of poor people are just stupid and lazy. My wife is a teacher in the hood and I hear confirmation of this every day. These people reap what they sow for the most part. A large part of the blame rests on culture. I'm only mildly racist, but I'm extremely cultureist. Black ghetto culture is derived from white trash hillbilly culture, but nobody will say anything is wrong with it. But making fun of rednecks is OK. Black ghetto culture is a major problem nationally. Islam is a major problem globally. Pretending that a religion that never went through the Enlightenment and promotes throwing rocks at people until they die is inferior, a problem, and must be dealt with.

I really hope you guys don't remove this because these are my honest thoughts and I'd love to hear a convincing argument to the contrary based in reason and not emotion and the desire to be unquestioningly nice to everyone.

I mean, this just tells me you don't have much experience outside of your bubble. But ignoring your racial undertones (which i'm fairly certain you included to try and troll) the real issue is the inability to "get out". This isn't true of just inner city poor people, it's true of people in appalachia too. I used to work with poor kids in the midwest and now work quite a bit with poor kids in NYC and they suffer from similar problems. And it's things that set them so far back at such a young age that they never really stand a chance. Some of the mindsets are different in terms of how they think about life, the economy, government, etc. But that's more of a regional difference than anything else. The main issues are:

1) Our base level of education is bad. The way it's set up with a little bit of federal funding, trickling down to state funding, and then ultimately being funded by local taxes means it's inherently going to create a huge gap between rich and poor societies. It's completely dependent on whether or not you can live in a rich community. On top of that, so much of learning is done outside of the classroom, that people who can afford after school/summer programs are getting an even further jump ahead. That's why funding for after school programs are so important and why cutting them is simply shameful.

This is a non-starter, but a federally mandated floor level education is what we need. But it requires a massive investment and for people to agree that science is real, which won't happen anytime soon.

2) Food insecurity, lack of access to healthy food, and lack of access to the same level of healthcare. Kids who suffer from food insecurity or are unable to get healthy food suffer from developmental issues. On top of that, their developmental issues are further exasperated by a much lower level (if any) healthcare than others. You combine bad nutrition, less ability to learn, and being sick more often and you have a child who, quite frankly, isn't at near high enough of a playing field to compete with those of us who came from more well off families. Studies show that this with lack of proper nutrition and healthcare are far more likely to fail in school, suffer developmental deficiencies, and have behavioral issues. We are talking by the age of 10-12 a kid has done so poorly in school and behaviorally that he's often in a hole that is almost already impossible to get out of.

This is why cutting feeding, housing, and healthcare for the poor is so important for these kids.

3) Lack of knowledge about options. Often cases these kids have single parents or parents that work multiple jobs and they don't know about college, or internships, or trade applications, etc. And in these schools that that are underfunded the resources to support kids to try and get them that knowledge is very small comparatively. So they don't even KNOW that they can take out federal grants for education. Or that they need to do specific things to get into college or a trade school.

4) Lack of legal resources. I'm probably not the only one on this site that got in trouble with the law as a juvenile over dumb stuff. What did I have? Good legal representation that made it go away without a problem. In most places kids are dealing with overworked and often very poor practitioners who push them into pleas that give them a record for life. Not too mention lack of income to post bail and they lose jobs while waiting for trial, and just how absurd the incentives are in the justice system that most people involved care more about getting A conviction than they do the right one.

The justice system incentives those that work in it to find the easiest target, who can't post bail, is the most uninformed, and bully them into plea deals. On top of that, mandatory minimums for non violent offenses in many cases are absolutely devoid of common sense.

We just simply don't do enough to help kids from a young age and in return it perpetuates a cyclical nature of poverty because, if you can't pay for any of the above things and you aren't developed enough from a young age to compete, you have to turn to low paying jobs just to live, or drugs to feel like you fit in, etc. These kids don't decide at a young age that this is what they want for their life, they are just doomed before they even realize it. Then they feel a sense of impending doom and hopelessness by the time they are in their teens. And soon enough are addicts, or lifetime minimum wage workers without understanding that things could have been different.

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Mar 16, 2017

"Outliers" by Malcolm Gladwell,
hits a lot of these topics.

Mar 16, 2017
AllDay_028:

GoldenCinderblock:I've always had a theory that the vast majority of poor people are just stupid and lazy. My wife is a teacher in the hood and I hear confirmation of this every day. These people reap what they sow for the most part. A large part of the blame rests on culture. I'm only mildly racist, but I'm extremely cultureist. Black ghetto culture is derived from white trash hillbilly culture, but nobody will say anything is wrong with it. But making fun of rednecks is OK. Black ghetto culture is a major problem nationally. Islam is a major problem globally. Pretending that a religion that never went through the Enlightenment and promotes throwing rocks at people until they die is inferior, a problem, and must be dealt with.I really hope you guys don't remove this because these are my honest thoughts and I'd love to hear a convincing argument to the contrary based in reason and not emotion and the desire to be unquestioningly nice to everyone.

I mean, this just tells me you don't have much experience outside of your bubble. But ignoring your racial undertones (which i'm fairly certain you included to try and troll) the real issue is the inability to "get out". This isn't true of just inner city poor people, it's true of people in appalachia too. I used to work with poor kids in the midwest and now work quite a bit with poor kids in NYC and they suffer from similar problems. And it's things that set them so far back at such a young age that they never really stand a chance. Some of the mindsets are different in terms of how they think about life, the economy, government, etc. But that's more of a regional difference than anything else. The main issues are:

1) Our base level of education is bad. The way it's set up with a little bit of federal funding, trickling down to state funding, and then ultimately being funded by local taxes means it's inherently going to create a huge gap between rich and poor societies. It's completely dependent on whether or not you can live in a rich community. On top of that, so much of learning is done outside of the classroom, that people who can afford after school/summer programs are getting an even further jump ahead. That's why funding for after school programs are so important and why cutting them is simply shameful.

This is a non-starter, but a federally mandated floor level education is what we need. But it requires a massive investment and for people to agree that science is real, which won't happen anytime soon.

2) Food insecurity, lack of access to healthy food, and lack of access to the same level of healthcare. Kids who suffer from food insecurity or are unable to get healthy food suffer from developmental issues. On top of that, their developmental issues are further exasperated by a much lower level (if any) healthcare than others. You combine bad nutrition, less ability to learn, and being sick more often and you have a child who, quite frankly, isn't at near high enough of a playing field to compete with those of us who came from more well off families. Studies show that this with lack of proper nutrition and healthcare are far more likely to fail in school, suffer developmental deficiencies, and have behavioral issues. We are talking by the age of 10-12 a kid has done so poorly in school and behaviorally that he's often in a hole that is almost already impossible to get out of.

This is why cutting feeding, housing, and healthcare for the poor is so important for these kids.

3) Lack of knowledge about options. Often cases these kids have single parents or parents that work multiple jobs and they don't know about college, or internships, or trade applications, etc. And in these schools that that are underfunded the resources to support kids to try and get them that knowledge is very small comparatively. So they don't even KNOW that they can take out federal grants for education. Or that they need to do specific things to get into college or a trade school.

4) Lack of legal resources. I'm probably not the only one on this site that got in trouble with the law as a juvenile over dumb stuff. What did I have? Good legal representation that made it go away without a problem. In most places kids are dealing with overworked and often very poor practitioners who push them into pleas that give them a record for life. Not too mention lack of income to post bail and they lose jobs while waiting for trial, and just how absurd the incentives are in the justice system that most people involved care more about getting A conviction than they do the right one.

The justice system incentives those that work in it to find the easiest target, who can't post bail, is the most uninformed, and bully them into plea deals. On top of that, mandatory minimums for non violent offenses in many cases are absolutely devoid of common sense.

We just simply don't do enough to help kids from a young age and in return it perpetuates a cyclical nature of poverty because, if you can't pay for any of the above things and you aren't developed enough from a young age to compete, you have to turn to low paying jobs just to live, or drugs to feel like you fit in, etc. These kids don't decide at a young age that this is what they want for their life, they are just doomed before they even realize it. Then they feel a sense of impending doom and hopelessness by the time they are in their teens. And soon enough are addicts, or lifetime minimum wage workers without understanding that things could have been different.

Beautifully articulated. I applaud your insight.

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Mar 16, 2017
  1. I'm a fatherless immigrant and convicted felon who's managed to be an employed, married homeowner, real estate investor, broker, and business owner. Fuck your white privilege shit. I didn't even speak English until I was 8.
  2. Yes, public education is absurdly poor. There are several classrooms in my wife's school where the teacher has quit mid-year and there's no budget to hire another one, so the kids literally watch movies all day supervised by an aid. CPS is falling apart and will likely collapse in the next few years. They're talking about ending the school year in May this year. They have 2 weeks of operating budget reserve. Charter schools outperform public schools and should be embraced. But, there are test-in public schools that any child can go to if they test in.
  3. The food argument is some Don Lemon shit and food deserts don't exist. My wife works in North Lawndale, one of the worst neighborhoods in Chicago. It's a 15 minute drive from my house, where I live very comfortably and get $1,500 rent for a 2-BR from my downstairs tenant. Chicago has one of the best public transit systems in the country. It is not hard to get to healthy food. Furthermore, my wife and I eat very healthy and our grocery bill is consequently very low. These people spend on takeout many times more than what I spend on actual groceries. Obesity rates are huge.
  4. Lack of knowledge is a major problem. I can say that every kid at my wife's school is very aware of college as they're making a big push to try to get kids in. But knowledge deficiency is a problem for everyone. We don't know what we don't know. It takes time and effort to learn about exercise, nutrition, mental health, and how to make money in this world. I don't know how to just give this knowledge to people. You have to want it and seek it out and doing so has never been easier.
  5. I agree. Having a good lawyer helped me immensely in my handful of legal encounters. When I was in jail the last time, which was the most serious time, I called my sister and told her to get the best lawyer, I don't give a fuck what it costs, and I will pay you back. She did it and I paid her back. I got 4 felonies dropped to one less serious one and after 6 months, I will be off probation and can have this removed from my record.

I spent 3 days in jail waiting to see the judge and not a single person in there was concerned with losing their jobs. I overheard a lot of conversations, but not a single one involved gainful employment.

I've also built a pretty good rapport with my probation officer. Guess what she told me. She told me I'm the first one of her clients (I guess) to not violate a 2-year probation in a long time. She says the MAJORITY of people violate at every check-in. I started out having to see her monthly and now I'm down to every 3 months because I'm in the low-risk category now. That's not because I'm white. That's because I maintain employment, a stable home environment, and don't fail drug tests. And by the way, I still smoke weed. I just stop 2 weeks before probation and drug test myself before coming. Because I'm not fucking retarded and I give a shit.

heister:

Look at all these wannabe richies hating on an expensive salad.

https://arthuxtable.com/

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Mar 16, 2017

Allday - Your fourth point is extremely relevant. I've personally never been arrested but growing up in a middle class white community and going into college, it's unreal to see the mistakes kids get away with from having a "good lawyer". Worst part is the sense of entitlement this creates.

Whether everyone wants to acknowledge it or not, even us conservatives, under-privileged kids in inner city's just don't get by that mistake, it tranquilizes them and completely alters the trajectory of their life.

    • 1
Mar 16, 2017

Want to know an interesting fact. To get into the middle class the CBO has determined that Americans have to do 3 things. 1) Graduate from high school 2) Be in a mutually benefical relationship (marriage) 3) Not have kids before you get married. Of the people who do these things something like 92%+ of them make it from poverty to the middle class. If anyone thinks that those things are too fucking hard they need to be fed to the alligators.

Follow the shit your fellow monkeys say @shitWSOsays

Life is hard, it's even harder when you're stupid - John Wayne

    • 11
Mar 19, 2017
AllDay_028:

GoldenCinderblock:I've always had a theory that the vast majority of poor people are just stupid and lazy. My wife is a teacher in the hood and I hear confirmation of this every day. These people reap what they sow for the most part. A large part of the blame rests on culture. I'm only mildly racist, but I'm extremely cultureist. Black ghetto culture is derived from white trash hillbilly culture, but nobody will say anything is wrong with it. But making fun of rednecks is OK. Black ghetto culture is a major problem nationally. Islam is a major problem globally. Pretending that a religion that never went through the Enlightenment and promotes throwing rocks at people until they die is inferior, a problem, and must be dealt with.I really hope you guys don't remove this because these are my honest thoughts and I'd love to hear a convincing argument to the contrary based in reason and not emotion and the desire to be unquestioningly nice to everyone.

I mean, this just tells me you don't have much experience outside of your bubble. But ignoring your racial undertones (which i'm fairly certain you included to try and troll) the real issue is the inability to "get out". This isn't true of just inner city poor people, it's true of people in appalachia too. I used to work with poor kids in the midwest and now work quite a bit with poor kids in NYC and they suffer from similar problems. And it's things that set them so far back at such a young age that they never really stand a chance. Some of the mindsets are different in terms of how they think about life, the economy, government, etc. But that's more of a regional difference than anything else. The main issues are:

1) Our base level of education is bad. The way it's set up with a little bit of federal funding, trickling down to state funding, and then ultimately being funded by local taxes means it's inherently going to create a huge gap between rich and poor societies. It's completely dependent on whether or not you can live in a rich community. On top of that, so much of learning is done outside of the classroom, that people who can afford after school/summer programs are getting an even further jump ahead. That's why funding for after school programs are so important and why cutting them is simply shameful.

This is a non-starter, but a federally mandated floor level education is what we need. But it requires a massive investment and for people to agree that science is real, which won't happen anytime soon.

2) Food insecurity, lack of access to healthy food, and lack of access to the same level of healthcare. Kids who suffer from food insecurity or are unable to get healthy food suffer from developmental issues. On top of that, their developmental issues are further exasperated by a much lower level (if any) healthcare than others. You combine bad nutrition, less ability to learn, and being sick more often and you have a child who, quite frankly, isn't at near high enough of a playing field to compete with those of us who came from more well off families. Studies show that this with lack of proper nutrition and healthcare are far more likely to fail in school, suffer developmental deficiencies, and have behavioral issues. We are talking by the age of 10-12 a kid has done so poorly in school and behaviorally that he's often in a hole that is almost already impossible to get out of.

This is why cutting feeding, housing, and healthcare for the poor is so important for these kids.

3) Lack of knowledge about options. Often cases these kids have single parents or parents that work multiple jobs and they don't know about college, or internships, or trade applications, etc. And in these schools that that are underfunded the resources to support kids to try and get them that knowledge is very small comparatively. So they don't even KNOW that they can take out federal grants for education. Or that they need to do specific things to get into college or a trade school.

4) Lack of legal resources. I'm probably not the only one on this site that got in trouble with the law as a juvenile over dumb stuff. What did I have? Good legal representation that made it go away without a problem. In most places kids are dealing with overworked and often very poor practitioners who push them into pleas that give them a record for life. Not too mention lack of income to post bail and they lose jobs while waiting for trial, and just how absurd the incentives are in the justice system that most people involved care more about getting A conviction than they do the right one.

The justice system incentives those that work in it to find the easiest target, who can't post bail, is the most uninformed, and bully them into plea deals. On top of that, mandatory minimums for non violent offenses in many cases are absolutely devoid of common sense.

We just simply don't do enough to help kids from a young age and in return it perpetuates a cyclical nature of poverty because, if you can't pay for any of the above things and you aren't developed enough from a young age to compete, you have to turn to low paying jobs just to live, or drugs to feel like you fit in, etc. These kids don't decide at a young age that this is what they want for their life, they are just doomed before they even realize it. Then they feel a sense of impending doom and hopelessness by the time they are in their teens. And soon enough are addicts, or lifetime minimum wage workers without understanding that things could have been different.

Thank you for taking the time to write this up. Even though I don't think it will change anyone's preexisting views of the poor

    • 1
Apr 5, 2017

I went to a school in Oakland and you will be surprised at how little these people realize they have options. In all honesty, it's really a mix of laziness and lack of opportunity.

The sad reality is that if you come from a ghetto, you have to work way harder than everyone else. I thank god every day that at least my parents taught me about work ethic and ambition because with out that it's impossible to get anywhere.

Truthfully it's sad, but also motivating.

    • 1
Mar 16, 2017

You are racist due to the fact that you connect black and ghetto as synonymous. While the rest of your post is purely based on your own world view of which is yours and yours alone, it doesn't mean that it applies to other places of the country or world.

The answer to your question is 1) network 2) get involved 3) beef up your resume 4) repeat -happypantsmcgee

WSO is not your personal search function.

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Mar 16, 2017

No, I'm racist because I believe that different ethnicities are genetically different, which is the definition of racism. And the vast majority of residents of ghettos are black. It's just a fact.

heister:

Look at all these wannabe richies hating on an expensive salad.

https://arthuxtable.com/

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    • 4
Mar 16, 2017
GoldenCinderblock:

I've always had a theory that the vast majority of poor people are just stupid and lazy. My wife is a teacher in the hood and I hear confirmation of this every day. These people reap what they sow for the most part. A large part of the blame rests on culture. I'm only mildly racist, but I'm extremely cultureist. Black ghetto culture is derived from white trash hillbilly culture, but nobody will say anything is wrong with it. But making fun of rednecks is OK. Black ghetto culture is a major problem nationally. Islam is a major problem globally. A religion that never went through the Enlightenment and promotes throwing rocks at people until they die is inferior, a problem, and must be dealt with.

I really hope you guys don't remove this because these are my honest thoughts and I'd love to hear a convincing argument to the contrary based in reason and not emotion and the desire to be unquestioningly nice to everyone.

I'm with you 100%. I'm not a racist at all but I am a cultural-ist. I thank God for black Africans (they were the first humans and we Europeans used to look exactly like them!) and Africa and Africans have an AMAZING cultural heritage, but African Americans (who are really largely African and white European) have a horribly destructive culture. It's politically incorrect to say this, but some cultures--not races or ethnicities--are superior.

Mar 16, 2017

Bottom line is you cannot find me ONE SINGLE place in the world that is 90% black and doesn't suck, whether we're talking about Ghana, East Side Detroit or your local Waffle House at 2am, they are all places that no one wants to be. On the contrary, anywhere in the world that is 90% Anglo-saxon is sought after territory. I'm Italian so I don't even really have skin in this game, I'm just sayin.

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Mar 16, 2017
Virginia Tech 4ever:

GoldenCinderblock:I've always had a theory that the vast majority of poor people are just stupid and lazy. My wife is a teacher in the hood and I hear confirmation of this every day. These people reap what they sow for the most part. A large part of the blame rests on culture. I'm only mildly racist, but I'm extremely cultureist. Black ghetto culture is derived from white trash hillbilly culture, but nobody will say anything is wrong with it. But making fun of rednecks is OK. Black ghetto culture is a major problem nationally. Islam is a major problem globally. A religion that never went through the Enlightenment and promotes throwing rocks at people until they die is inferior, a problem, and must be dealt with.I really hope you guys don't remove this because these are my honest thoughts and I'd love to hear a convincing argument to the contrary based in reason and not emotion and the desire to be unquestioningly nice to everyone.

I'm with you 100%. I'm not a racist at all but I am a cultural-ist. I thank God for black Africans (they were the first humans and we Europeans used to look exactly like them!) and Africa and Africans have an AMAZING cultural heritage, but African Americans (who are really largely African and white European) have a horribly destructive culture. It's politically incorrect to say this, but some cultures--not races or ethnicities--are superior.

If you are going go full David Duke, just embrace it. Why the mental gymnastics that would only fool a child? We get it, you're racist, and proud of it. Calling it "cultural-ist because I just really hate those damn black peoples culture" doesn't make you morally superior to the guy who just says "fuck those n*". That's who you are, just embrace it.

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Mar 17, 2017
GoldenCinderblock:

<

p>I've always had a theory that the vast majority of poor people are just stupid and lazy. My wife is a teacher in the hood and I hear confirmation of this every day. These people reap what they sow for the most part. A large part of the blame rests on culture.

I disagree that most poor people "reap what they sow". Sure, you hear those "rags to riches" stories every now and then, but that is bullshit. If you are born in the hood, with no chance of a decent education, absolutely no wealth to fall back on, no hope at all, then there is absolutely no incentive to work hard.

I'm not saying I believe in 'equality'. But I do firmly believe this country should always strive try to achieve 'equal opportunity'. There's a huge difference.

If you view life like a racetrack, you have some people starting the race a mile behind the starting line, and others (many people on this forum) who have started a mile ahead of the starting line. The poor people starting a mile behind could be the fastest racers out there, but given their starting point in life, they will never catch up. And society will never benefit from those people.

    • 2
Mar 20, 2017

That is a terrible analogy. It works on the assumption that there is only one finish line, which again is a completely bullshit idea. The "American Dream" isn't a two story house in a nice suburb with 4 cars and 2.3 kids. The American Dream is giving you kids a better life than you had. If that means moving out of a cheap motel into and apartment then you have achieved the American Dream. I find the idea that cultural relativism is some no no subject to talk about yet wealth relativism is wide open for discussion. The idea of the American Dream has been put in the overton window and drifted from what it once was to a place now where equality of outcome is the only thing that matters.

Follow the shit your fellow monkeys say @shitWSOsays

Life is hard, it's even harder when you're stupid - John Wayne

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Mar 17, 2017
GoldenCinderblock:

I'm only mildly racist, but I'm extremely cultureist. .

How is being mildly racist a good thing?

Mar 18, 2017

It's more of a joke because according to the modern definition of what racism means everyone is at least mildly racist.

Follow the shit your fellow monkeys say @shitWSOsays

Life is hard, it's even harder when you're stupid - John Wayne

Mar 20, 2017
GoldenCinderblock:

I've always had a theory that the vast majority of poor people are just stupid and lazy. My wife is a teacher in the hood and I hear confirmation of this every day. These people reap what they sow for the most part. A large part of the blame rests on culture. I'm only mildly racist, but I'm extremely cultureist. Black ghetto culture is derived from white trash hillbilly culture, but nobody will say anything is wrong with it. But making fun of rednecks is OK. Black ghetto culture is a major problem nationally. Islam is a major problem globally. A religion that never went through the Enlightenment and promotes throwing rocks at people until they die is inferior, a problem, and must be dealt with.

I really hope you guys don't remove this because these are my honest thoughts and I'd love to hear a convincing argument to the contrary based in reason and not emotion and the desire to be unquestioningly nice to everyone.

It's people like you that makes it hard for me to love this country. You're so willing to ignore the vast historical injustices that have led to that "black ghetto culture" you seem to know so much about

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Mar 19, 2017

Again, my argument was that it exists and it's terrible. Nothing about whose fault it is.

heister:

Look at all these wannabe richies hating on an expensive salad.

https://arthuxtable.com/

Mar 20, 2017

If you hate it so much, why don't you leave? I always find statements like this to be comical.

Follow the shit your fellow monkeys say @shitWSOsays

Life is hard, it's even harder when you're stupid - John Wayne

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Mar 20, 2017

If your wife is a teacher in the hood she's probably not rich and would likely benefit from some of the social programs in some way if not for what I'm sure is "substantial" financial support from your impressive self.

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Mar 16, 2017

When poor people get hungry they revolt and revolutions are started. America is headed down this path.

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Mar 16, 2017
REPE8:

When poor people get hungry they revolt and revolutions are started. America is headed down this path.

America's poor are the richest poor people in human history.

Mar 16, 2017

I don't disagree.

It's not necessarily how poor they are but how they perceive the gap between what they have and what the wealthy have.

This goes to the point that a middle-class is not likely to exist in 50 years. You're either wealthy or your poor.

Mar 20, 2017
Virginia Tech 4ever:

REPE8:When poor people get hungry they revolt and revolutions are started. America is headed down this path.

America's poor are the richest poor people in human history.

Lol What's your basis for this statement? Have you lived in several different improvised communities in America? How do you define wealth? Back up your claim. what data could you possibly be looking at? Truth is we have some of the poorest lower/working class people in the 'developed' world. So your statement is empirically false

Mar 16, 2017

Successful revolutions also require serious amounts of organization and planning.

Mar 16, 2017

This makes me think: Have poor people (for lack of a better term) ever successfully overthrown a prosperous and organized government?

heister:

Look at all these wannabe richies hating on an expensive salad.

https://arthuxtable.com/

Mar 16, 2017

Well I'm glad all of the History minors got a chance to exercise their passion in this thread. SB's all around.

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Mar 16, 2017

Well, it is the more calm side of the thread!

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Mar 16, 2017

There is plenty of opportunity in this country if you are willing to go at it:

-- Selling cars to selling medical devices, seen it.

-- Drive, grey hound, hitch hike to the nearest oil town during boom times and make 80k+ your first year. You can arrive in midland with no shoes, no shirt, no GED and one arm and have a job by sundown. Seen it.

-- Work 50 hours a week while in college while studying engineering coming from a small Louisiana town. Seen it.

-- Go into tech sales from selling cell phones/other dumb shit with no college degree via performance. Actually quite common.

-- Venezuelan roommate comes from Venezuela and works at a gas station while finishing college. Starts a business and has to support his mom because her pension in Venezuela was gone b/c of gov't while finishing his last year of college. Happened.

Plus plenty more I've seen...

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Mar 16, 2017

So from what you have provided, it is almost as if you put in effort and try to abide by the law, that you might actually have some success in life. Odd that this could work.

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Mar 16, 2017

I've seen some pretty ingenious illegal ways too. Those often in end in bodily harm or legal issues however so I left them out.

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Mar 16, 2017

One of the problems with being poor in USA is that you have poor freedom to move upwards, or to follow your dreams. Since healthcare is often bound to work (for far too many), you NEED to be employed to survive, in the literal sense. One serious illness or ailment could bankrupt you for life.

This creates an environment where poor Americans will take any job they can, and employers know they can abuse their disposable employees. People ask "Why do poor people stay at those minimum wage jobs? They're meant for students and teens!", well, maybe those minimum wage jobs offer some kind of coverage. If you're a parent, your main goal is to ensure that your family is safe.

Imagine if there was some universal healthcare, so that people could actually do the things they wanted, without being shackled to their employers because of healthcare coverage.
Somehow the conservatives moan about "socialist" healthcare being un-American, but I'd say that keeping people from pursuing happiness is pretty fucking un-American.

But that's just one part of the equation. Other things I'd like to see:
Decriminalization of AT LEAST weed. (The amount of poor people being incarcerated because of bullshit reefer madness-era policies is staggering.)

Serious research on Universal Basic Income. Like it or not, many jobs are never, ever coming back. And they are not getting replaced with other jobs. The next industrial revolution will hit the poor very, very hard.

Mar 16, 2017

There are emergency rooms and they do service the uninsured and yes you and I do pay for it. However, I think that a charity should be started to cover unmet medical expenses for people of all ages. It removes the socialist stigma and allows people/entities to donate how they wish with tax benefits. So let's say somebody goes in for a procedure it would cover the expenses should the recipient qualify - i.e. unemployed with no coverage. The fact that this has not happened amazes me.

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Mar 17, 2017

What incentives would someone have to donate to such charity?

Mar 17, 2017

Poor Americans have had free medical. It is called Medicaid.

The people who are fucked with insurance are the lower middle class. Not poor enough for Medicaid. Not rich enough to not care.

And you cannot have basic income without limitations on reproduction. We need less humans, not more, especially from very poor countries.

Mar 17, 2017

Get rid of social security, Medicaid, food stamps, disability, unemployment, and every other entitlement program and give everyone a basic income.

You don't want to work? Well you can go live in a $250 studio in middle of nowhere Kansas with your basic income money and buy your food at the cheap grocery store.

Not sure if it is possible but it would be interesting to see if it was actually possible.

Mar 19, 2017

I can't think of a minimum wage job that offers health care benefits.

Mar 18, 2017

People on welfare with 2007+ Beamers, Audis or Acuras. And,the ones with unlimited data plans on their Iphone 7s.
That arn't right. But then again so isn't tax evasion, and (insert other stuff here). But who am I to judge how other citizens in my society act.

How is my grammar? Drop me a note with any errors you see!

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Mar 19, 2017

Who are you referinng to? Thats not even close to the reality of the average welfare recipient. Stop listening to the lie that American people on welfare are living comfortable luxurious lives. It's often a racially charge lie and a ploy so that the most wealthy pay less taxes (and the middle class votes for that)

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Mar 23, 2017

Relax.
Of course its not the average, but its not as uncommon as it should be. Just like the monetarily endowed using their resources to protect their wealth and avoid paying taxes while simultaneously attempting to reduce their effective tax rate. Maybe it is racially charged, seeing as how you brought it up, but it doesn't have to be. No matter your race you will do the things listed above.

The 'real' issues at hand:
1.) Could it be prevented, and would the costs of doing so outweigh the benefits?
2.) Why is the middle class, in your view of what makes up the middle class, voting for this?

It is what it is.

How is my grammar? Drop me a note with any errors you see!

Mar 20, 2017

Many encouraging and discouraging things about this thread. I won't get into the race conversation, all_day has pretty much covered the bases. You can sum up the plight of the poor in this country (and around the world) in one sentence: less margin for error. It is that simple. Any moron stating that poor stay poor simply because they are "lazy" is willfully ignoring reality. They have less margin for error in every way. Let's use high school as a simple example. The shitty public school you go to may not have a single person get an ivy league education, even the valedictorian, while the rich public school has multiple kids get into ivies. Once you get in college the middle class/ rich kid/ you the poor kid may all have shitty grades their first year, the middle class kid may have to go back home and go to community college for a bit on his parent's dime, the rich kid has his parents paying and can afford the fuck up, the poor kid gets his financial aid taken away and can't afford to pay for his community college so he goes to work at some minimum wage job, he may never go to college again. Even if he does his road back is much tougher. Look at having a kid in HS, rich kid will be just fine, middle class kid probably has parents to support him till he can support the kid, poor dude is probably fucked. Our entire justice system is set up so rich people face less of a punishment for the same crime than poor people. Of course, people often do overcome being poor, hard work and intelligence can get you far especially if they're in tandem. But let's work in averages since most people are average. The average rich kid will stay rich, the average middle class kid will stay middle class, the average poor person will stay poor. If "laziness" was the determining factor in economic outcomes then there should be way more movement by average people down the economic ladder, but there isn't. As long as this is the case we need to examine every reasonable path to making sure the poor don't suffer more than they need to.

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Mar 20, 2017

I think you're spot on about margin of error, but you finished by saying that we shouldn't make those are poor suffer more than they need to. While I agree with that as well, what do you propose be done about that? It sounds like you'res saying that those who have less should have lower standards (lower GPA requirement for college, more runway for bad grades, etc).

It's really great that everyone in this thread has a stable job and we all started out (or will start out) making, at a minimum, $60k base with rapid growth and likely large bonuses, but we can't just sit here in our ivory towers and point out problems without at least offering up solutions.

Mar 20, 2017

1.) Reform the justice system to go back to focus on rehabilitation of criminals (for example getting a technical degree/ going to community college online while in prison) rather than punishment. I would also end the bullshit war on drugs that keeps nonviolent offenders in prison and turns them into hardened criminals. I would also end the "3 strikes" system, repeat offenses can be taken into account but we shouldn't force a prison sentence based on repeat offenses. In this system though, we have to be careful to monitor judges so they do not abuse their discretionary power.

2.) I would focus on improving public education by making it easier to fire shitty teachers and also centralizing the property tax system so public school budgets are more equitable. Increasing the pay for teachers across the board to attract better talent might also be necessary. I would build in technical components into high schools where a kid can take a class in (for example) construction and get a certificate so upon leaving HS they can get a job in that industry without needing college. More funding for after-school programs focused on learning would also be welcome.

3.) Free healthcare and college for all American citizens is something that I think we also need to work towards. Also, extra funding for technical community colleges is something I would seriously look into implementing.

4.) I would expand public housing (or some kind of housing voucher system) and making it lease-to-OWN in order to incentivize the poor to maintain their homes rather than letting it go to ruin. One is much more likely to not let their homes go to shit (like much of public housing) if they have "skin in the game".

With these four components I think we can improve the lives of the poor, and their prospects for economic improvement, dramatically.

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Aug 6, 2019

Good post. This illustrates how America at a cultural level has shifted away from being primarily concerned with what portion of the population can achieve entrance (and stay in) the middle class to how large a slice of the total pie a shrinking amount of elite upper class winners can take.

Families like the Koch's and Walton's should pay/treat their employees better BECAUSE THEY CAN NOT BECAUSE THEY ARE REQUIRED TO. THEY SHOULD REALIZE A BETTER OUTCOME FOR THE AVERAGE AMERICAN IS IN THEIR BEST INTEREST IN THE LONG RUN AS THEIR BUSINESSES RELY ON MIDDLE CLASS CONSUMPTION.

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Mar 20, 2017

I think it all boils down to a lack of guidance and proper role models. In a poor community, chances are your parents work long hours and aren't around much.
Then you listen to a person like Future that raps about molly and percs and became rich from doing so. Why grind for years in school when you can be like your favorite rapper? Too many people become role models to people in poor communities for the wrong reasons. I am not saying that all people look to rappers as role models, but if you were to ask the average 13 year old in these schools who they look up to, chances are its a pop culture star. Whereas in a middle class family if you have two successful parents that serve as role models and are involved in your life, your aspirations in life may be different.

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Mar 20, 2017
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