Ebola virus ends the bull market?

sanjose04's picture
Rank: Orangutan | 351

I don't want to sound like a fear-mongerer or anything, but there are some signs that the Ebola virus can lead to a pandemic. If this causes an outbreak, it can greatly reduce the global trade volumes across the world and can impact the psyche of the mass population. If materialized, the mild contraction the U.S. experienced in the first quarter due to an unusually cold winter could greatly pale in comparison.

I want to hear from the WSOers : What's your guys thoughts on the Ebola virus? Will this claim further lives, potentially millions? Will this rock the stock market?

Comments (19)

Aug 3, 2014

If the Ebola virus does increase to levels which could be classed as a pandemic, the last thing on my mind would be the stock market.

Aug 3, 2014

A tsunami wiping out Japan's coast didn't end the bull market. Might want to start studying the Boom & Bust cycle and see how accurate that has been in predicting the major turns in the market. Getting toward the end of the Boom cycle which has zero to do with Ebola or winter storms.

Aug 3, 2014

If you're worried, invest every last penny you own into TKMR. Worldwide Ebola pandemic would surely make you millions.

Aug 4, 2014

Okay, I would suggest you look up the definitions of the words you are using. For a pandemic to occur, only a handful of people actually have to die. So the ebola outbreak is currently a pandemic. Recently the WHO had to really ratchet down the death toll required for a pandemic to be reached due to serious funding issues they were having. Every time a "pandemic" happens they are rewarded money from western governments.

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Aug 4, 2014

There is no way the US should have let those 2 people back into the country. I would have made them go to some US base or something for treatment.

Aug 4, 2014

The media has blown up bird flus, swine flus, and flus with lots of letters and numbers in their names that were supposedly going to be global epidemics/pandemics in the recent past. Ebola seems nastier but one of the worst epidemics since the Plague was the Spanish flu in 1917. I wouldn't worry, there are outbreaks of nasty shit in Africa regularly. Of course I hope I'm right.

But I agree with @"adapt or die", it seems like a pretty big risk bringing two infected people to ATL. I'm sure, or at least I hope, that the CDC knows what they're doing but at some point someone has to weigh the good of the few against the good of the many. No offense to the infected people and I feel bad for them but the other 310 million of us didn't decide to go into an ebola hot zone.

And like PSIBPS, if there's truly an ebola epidemic like in a movie like "Outbreak" or a tv show like "The Last Ship" (good show if anyone's caught it as a side note), the last thing anyone will care about is their stock portfolio.

Aug 4, 2014
Dingdong08:

@adapt or die, it seems like a pretty big risk bringing two infected people to ATL. I'm sure, or at least I hope, that the CDC knows what they're doing but at some point someone has to weigh the good of the few against the good of the many. No offense to the infected people and I feel bad for them but the other 310 million of us didn't decide to go into an ebola hot zone.

Shipping them right to ATL makes absolutely no sense to me. There is no reason they could not be treated at some remote island base.

On a side note, I just flipped over to CNN and it looks like we've cured them with an "experimental serum". Sorta reminds me of how we cured Magic Johnson of AIDS like 30 years ago and still acted like it was an untreatable death sentence to the rest of the infected population (Africa). These West Africans better hope this serum isn't super expensive.

Aug 4, 2014

This is one of those times where I hoped that there'd be a super secret base in the wilderness of Alaska where they could have taken them. I know the CDC is in Atlanta and Emory has one of four of these super contained biohazard hospital units, but maybe they should build one of those in the middle of nowhere rather than in the city that contains the world's busiest airports. Of course I have a PhD in infectious disease from Hollywood & Paperback Fiction University. Great target school by the way. Everyone recruits from there and you get right into GS TMT.

Aug 4, 2014

It's a non-issue.

Aug 4, 2014

I'm genuinely worried. This seems like a much more severe threat since is spreads so easily, and there is no treatment available in the near term. The government letting in infected patients back to U.S. soil is utterly retarded, but what do you expect from the dumbasses who run our government.

Aug 4, 2014

@"sanjose04" I don't think you understand Ebola very well, it's an extremely lethal disease but it needs bodily fluid contact to transmit. There is an outbreak in west Africa right now because many people live in abject poverty and resort to eating dead and rotting animals off the ground (lots of infected primates and marsupials, like fruit bats, which are known carriers). Notions of sanitation are lost on people who literally don't wash their hands because they don't have enough water to drink.

In a western environment, this is just not a virus to be worried about unless you're into sharing needles with people who just got back from safari in Sierra Leone.

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Aug 4, 2014

anybody remember SARS?

H1N1?

bird flu?

smallpox?

yeah, unless we're talking something like the bubonic plague on a mass scale wiping out massive amounts of people, it won't materially affect stocks

Aug 4, 2014

I'm in favor of bringing the two infected Americans home. This is after all the humane thing to do, as they put their own lives on the line by going over there to help those people in need.
Also from a medical and logistical perspective, it makes sense having them at a state of art research center that is Emory medical center so that any new experimental drugs can be immediately administered to them and have effects assessed right on the spot. Furthermore, once a patient recovers from Ebola he develops life long immunity to it. The good doctor is already getting better and actually walked into the facility all by himself. Once he recovers Emory can immediately work on extracting a vaccine from him. That makes him an ideal specimen. Having him under treatment and observations is ideal for adcancing Ebola research.

Aug 4, 2014

The virus can only be transferred by body fluid contact, so them taking them to an isolated area of the hospital is a no big deal.

Aug 4, 2014

From my understanding it's an airborne virus. If it can only be transferred via fluid contact, they wouldn't bother to do a full quarantine.

Aug 4, 2014
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