Females in finance punished more severely than their male counterparts

mcb21's picture
Rank: Baboon | 165

The topic of this article reminded me of a post on here a couple days ago (might have even been last week) where a monkey was seeking advice on how to treat a female coworker. In that post he mentioned it may be harder for the bank he works for to fire a woman. Doesn't seem that all banks see it that way according to this article.

"Men were more likely to have multiple problems on their records, with 41 percent showing two or more adverse disclosures. Only 22 percent of the women in the study had two or more disclosures...Misconduct complaints against men came from their employers only 28 percent of the time. That compares to 41 percent of the complaints against women."

Of course, there could be underlying circumstances not accounted for in the study referenced in the article that don't qualify as "misconduct" that assist in the decision to fire an employee after they participate in misconduct.

I'm sure some of you monkeys have some insightful opinions on this matter, so let's hear them!

[Link to article ](http://www.cnbc.com/2017/03/14/women-on-wall-st-pu...)

Comments (37)

Mar 15, 2017

Duh, spanking a man isn't as rewarding.

heister:

Look at all these wannabe richies hating on an expensive salad.

https://arthuxtable.com/

    • 5
Mar 11, 2019

damn whatup 2017 goldie you got this shit on lock already huh no need for 2019 goldie to step in huh good on you bro
youre still a fucking piece of shit in 2019 btw tho in case you were wondering

heister:

Look at all these wannabe richies hating on an expensive salad.

https://arthuxtable.com/

    • 3
Mar 15, 2017

I think people are hesitant to formally complain about a woman. For example, when I was an analyst I'd show up 15 minutes late in the morning. I knew my coworkers groaned about it but nothing happend. On the other hand, a male coworker did the same thing for a week or so. Our manager gave him a verbal warning within earshot of my desk.

My supervisor had no idea how to speak critically to a female subordinate. I understood if I managed to get a verbal warning I'd done more than cross a line. But the job kinda sucked so I made it a game. If I knew something didn't affect my work I didn't see it as unethical. Playing chicken with your boss can be fun.

    • 3
Best Response
Mar 15, 2017

As a man I think I can relate a little bit to what is going on here. Whenever a female friend fucks me or someone close to me over I feel like the guys generally won't come out guns blazing and confront them because we feel like they can't handle it rationally so we're more likely to just ignore it and then eventually dismiss them completely without ever really confronting them. On the contrary, if one of the guys does something shitty, we're all over them and a fight might break out in the moment, but after that we're all boys because we know the problem has been dealt with in terms of mutual blind testosterone and anger. Maybe this is how the predominantly male upper management of the finance world feels. They aren't going to get into it with their female employee for showing up 15 minutes late or having a bad attitude, but they'll never forget it and eventually they'll get pissed off and just let them go. Perhaps it can be boiled down to males having poor communication skills.

    • 16
Mar 16, 2017

Agree completely.

Let me hear you say, this shit is bananas, B-A-N-A-N-A-S!

Learn More

Side-by-side comparison of top modeling training courses + exclusive discount through WSO here.

Funniest
Mar 11, 2019

I mean what DO you do when a female subordinate is a smartass to you? I imagine you can't just call her a c*** at work; so it gets "remembered" and what do you do about it? What if it happens again? You fire her.

With men you can be like "Look dude if you're gonna be a d*** you can go home I dont care about you." Because what is he gonna do, put you on Twitter and it become a viral video?

    • 9
Mar 11, 2019

Hahaha second paragraph wins this thread.

Mar 11, 2019

I feel like this is somewhat accurate tbh. My MD basically asked me why I was being so insecure about my modeling and always deferring to my Associate/VP for comments. That was a fun 9am Monday. He was extremely to the point about things though and was basically saying "stop f***ing up" and it worked with me

Mar 12, 2019
LReed:

As a man I think I can relate a little bit to what is going on here. Whenever a female friend fucks me or someone close to me over I feel like the guys generally won't come out guns blazing and confront them because we feel like they can't handle it rationally so we're more likely to just ignore it and then eventually dismiss them completely without ever really confronting them. On the contrary, if one of the guys does something shitty, we're all over them and a fight might break out in the moment, but after that we're all boys because we know the problem has been dealt with in terms of mutual blind testosterone and anger. Maybe this is how the predominantly male upper management of the finance world feels. They aren't going to get into it with their female employee for showing up 15 minutes late or having a bad attitude, but they'll never forget it and eventually they'll get pissed off and just let them go. Perhaps it can be boiled down to males having poor communication skills.

Agree with this.
When a female that doesn't seem very well balanced / prone to emotional nonsense doesn't perform to the standard expected, men tend to just put a mental black cross next to her name and basically "check-out" mentally on her.
Everyone kind of understands that she is not really seen as "a potential to develop" and as long as she is not overtly detrimental to the business or complaining about lack of advancement nobody really bothers to flag anything.
But she will be paid less and let's say second in line for the random layoffs.

This is also a very subtle but pernicious side effect of all the metoo noise.
Males don't stick their neck and just leave females to their own demise.

    • 2
Mar 15, 2017

Depends on experience I guess. I have seen women move up faster than men who had more time at the desk and trained in the women. However, the guys were burned on the position and wrote off the job as a paycheck as they looked for the next job. That being said, I have also seen the same women come back from maternity leave and drop their notice and go to new firms/funds that they sought out while on maternity leave.

    • 1
Mar 16, 2017

Randy... I got $100 here for groceries, I got $1400 here for liquor, and I got $6000 for you to go and bail out a couple of shit puppets. We might need a couple of more shit puppets for our play, and they gotta be angry shit puppets, Randy. And you gotta make em angry shit puppets, and you say whatever it takes to make them angry, but they're not angry at us Randy. Shit puppets are supposed to be angry at other shit puppets... take the bus.

    • 4
    • 1
Mar 16, 2017

Sounds like the winds of shit are blowing again.

    • 2
Mar 16, 2017

Still yet to see any of my male counterparts throw a tantrum and cry in the office. That'll be the day.

    • 9
    • 1
Mar 16, 2017

For one, I'm sure an educated analyst with access to the source data could tear this "study" up. I'm almost certain the 3 "researchers" (this is social science, not real science) went in seeking data to support their pre-held beliefs and ignored or hid data that contradicted the conclusion they were seeking.

Nevertheless, I find it amazing how the political left is so obsessed with focusing on the lowest common denominator(s) of society. What are these social "scientists" actually saying? Are they saying that women are being unfairly punished or that men are not being punished enough? To me this is like liberals complaining that a black murderer gets the death sentence while a white murderer gets life in prison. If you're guilty of the crime (or misconduct, in this case) and you get fired then you deserved to be fired--if someone else is not fired for their misconduct and you are fired for your misconduct does that mean you were unfairly treated? To me it seems like you were fairly treated while someone else may have received un-due mercy.

I went to pick up a new suit a few weeks ago that I had ordered a week prior. On my way I was pulled over and ticketed for having an expired inspection ticket. When I picked up the suit from my sales associate I was grumbling about the ticket and she commented to me that the night before she was pulled over for DUI and let go by the police officer. For a while I boiled inside--"how could I get a ticket for an expired inspection ticket and this chick gets off on a DUI?!!" Later it struck me that how the officer handled her was of no importance to me--had I not failed to re-inspect my car I would have faced no penalty for my own misconduct.

Mar 16, 2017

1.) Your first paragraph is an allegation with no evidence. Hid data? Really? Because you don't agree with the outcome of the study you assume it's all a lie? Wow.
2.) If the "undue mercy" you speak of is simply based on race/ sex that's bullshit. If I can't get undue mercy because I'm black and you can because you're white that's a fundamentally racist system. Now apply that to this study. Also, minorities are more likely to be wrongfully convicted.
3.) Cool anecdote

I wish, for once, people would just look at data and be like damn that's fucked up, instead of, omg it doesn't support my belief so let me rush to question the data.

    • 3
    • 13
Mar 16, 2017

Anyone who has ever graced an economics class above 101 understands to always question the data. You realize how often statistics with confounding variables are quoted to make brash generalizations? You can't be serious with that last sentence.

    • 4
Mar 16, 2017
BobTheBaker:

1.) Your first paragraph is an allegation with no evidence. Hid data? Really? Because you don't agree with the outcome of the study you assume it's all a lie? Wow.

I obviously don't have any evidence because I don't have access to the source data. Social science has lost a lot of academic credibility because it has produced many studies with conclusions that don't stand up under the weight of empirical scrutiny. When social scientists are self-labeled as over 90% liberal, I have no doubt that this was the hypothesis to be tested--"women are discriminated against on Wall Street." And I have little doubt (some doubt, but little) that the "social scientists" cherry-picked data to prove their hypothesis true.

BobTheBaker:

2.) If the "undue mercy" you speak of is simply based on race/ sex that's bullshit. If I can't get undue mercy because I'm black and you can because you're white that's a fundamentally racist system.

I'm sorry, but I'm not going to lose sleep over a black murderer receiving the death sentence because a white guy didn't (and should have). Neither am I going to lose sleep over a woman getting fired for misconduct while a man (allegedly) didn't. If that's the focus of my social justice mission then I have a pretty morally bankrupt social justice mission.

BobTheBaker:

I wish, for once, people would just look at data and be like damn that's fucked up, instead of, omg it doesn't support my belief so let me rush to question the data.

It's not that simple. You have to critically examine the data. You know as well as anyone else that you can cherry-pick data to prove a hypothesis or you can manipulate real data to "prove" your position. Financial models are garbage-in, garbage out--I can make a stock, piece of real estate, bond, etc. price any way I want so long as I use inputs to justify that price. A good analyst critically analyzes the data and doesn't accept at face value the conclusion that is spoon-fed to the public.

Mar 16, 2017

i think that questioning the data, no matter where it comes from, is good. that's what we in the civilized world call 'critical thinking." it enables me to think for myself and make sure that I am not being sold a big steaming bag of diarrhea. plus if your data is legit then you should welcome the questions as an opportunity to reinforce your message, otherwise i am going to assume your data/study/products is shit.

Mar 12, 2019

Found the hyper-liberal SJW on WSO

Mar 11, 2019

The white maleness is strong with this one

    • 1
Mar 11, 2019

.

Mar 16, 2017

It's so obvious really , the straight white male is a demon and a blight on the world.
Now dropping the sarcasm, this is just more liberal bullshit, can people please just get on with work instead of feely outraged/discriminated/entitled etc. No one as a right to be happy and live in some utopia, just stfu and get on with life and just deal with it.

Btw, the best way to guarantee job security is just to be a one eyed gay black tranny, no one would dare fire you then.

    • 4
    • 2
Mar 11, 2019

My guess is it is probably the reverse. Male bosses probably feel much more comfortable treating male employees like crap while they will go softer on women - either due to biology or so they aren't sued

Mar 11, 2019

From my experience this is not true at all. Anecdotally, I've seen males get reamed for coming in late whereas females could come in at whatever time they pleased, and not have anything be said to them.

Mar 11, 2019

It's so much easier for women to get into banking these days.. live by the sword die by the sword

    • 2
Mar 11, 2019

I work in a boutique with just a single woman and she gets away with murder because of it. She f***** up a task and me and the senior associate were telling the md that because she didnt do it correctly we had to do it and so it would be delayed getting sent out to the PE firm and he just said (without seeing any of her work) "I doubt she did it wrong"

Mar 11, 2019
Comment
    • 2
Mar 11, 2019