I may have spoken too much in my 1st interview. ,,,

Hello,
I had a first interview meeting today with a hedge fund and I just cannot say if it went well or not.

Here's the setup:
Phone interview, first contact, 1 vs. 3 (HR, Associate, Director of the fund). The fund is $1.2 billion. Specialty distressed debt, from New York. I am interviewed about their energy practice. The interview was supposed to be 30min
We started with the classical questions:
Elevator pitch, explained more or less what I am doing
Some back and forth on the motivations, what I know about the company, how i see the energy sector, what's my interest in it and so on.

And then asked me if I had any questions. I then jumped right in, and asked a ton of questions, their size, their specialty, some questions about if they do any equity investments, their scope, their geography and so on and so forth. ...

More over, the associate spoke more to me than the director, he only asked 2 or 3 questions, and answered my direct questions.

I don't know what to think of it. I am concerned i spoke too much. What do you think?

Comments (18)

Feb 21, 2020

Any one willing to help me with this ?

Array

  • Analyst 3+ in HF - Event
Feb 21, 2020

What do you need help with? If it went poorly you can't do anything about it now. Learn and move on to the next one.

Feb 21, 2020

Of course i'll move on if it didn't go well.
It's my first interview with a HE (and my first in the Finance industry at all).
I read a lot about it, but I don't know if it didn't overdo it.
What I am asking somewhere, is did I in your opinion overdo it.

Array

Most Helpful
Feb 21, 2020

Yeah, you overdid it. Two things:

1) as the applicant being interviewed, you don't determine if 30 min is enough (or measly), the interviewers do. In the real world if someone holds me over my allotted time in the meeting, I'm angry (within reason, depends on how important what I'm missing is, always exceptions - but in this case you had 30 min and that's it)

2) they asked if you had questions, which gives you an opportunity to ask 1 or 2 thoughtful questions and listen intently while they respond. They didn't invite you to pitch your own thesis on what they should invest in. It shows a lack of awareness.

Who knows, maybe you knocked it out of the park, but that's my read on the situation.

    • 5
Feb 21, 2020

One thing I learned from my mistakes, don't ask too many questions about the company. That's not what gets you through door. You're there for them to interview yo. Yes, I know it goes both way but they have the upper advantage because you need them, it's not the other way around. You asking questions non-stop will only annoy them. So what you should have done was talk more about yourself and depending on the job description, keep your experience revolving around that and how it can benefit them. Then they will start asking questions because they like what the hear and if they like what they hear, then you all can start having intellectual conversation on stuff that actually matters and turn that into building rapport THEN towards the end, you can go off topic and ask question... My mistake? I talked about my stuff not relating to the job and they didn't know which direction to go to. For example, I was interviewing for Goldman Sachs for their MBS MO position a long time ago after I got laid off and I was desperate... Anyway I kept talking about trading because that is where I came from. After leaving the interview, I was told I was "too front office"... I was appalled and thought it was the dumbest thing I've ever heard. But I guess the stuff I was talking about, it confused the MBS MO managers and they didn't know how to converse with me and probably confused them with my talk.

I've had interviews that was only supposed to last an hour but went hour an half... but thats because the interview went super well and we talked about everything after having our interview. If you get cut short, typically not a good sign but it can be 50-50 because they could have been extremely busy. Ask yourself, did they look bored? Was it awkward towards the end

    • 2
Feb 21, 2020

Never heard of anyone that went into an interview with the deliberate plan to make it last twice as long as scheduled. What makes you think anyone would want to hire a guy that doesnt shut up?

    • 1
Feb 21, 2020

I didn't go with a "deliberate plan". It's just that usually when an interview goes well, the interviewer lets is take a little more time, and I (rightfully or not) take it a positive sign when an interview goes a little later than planned.

Array

Funniest
Feb 21, 2020

Sounds like it didn't go well. Nobody likes someone with verbal diarrhea.

    • 8
Feb 21, 2020
hominem:

Sounds like it didn't go well. Nobody likes someone with verbal diarrhea.

Exactly. Two ears, one mouth theorem.

Feb 21, 2020

"He who speaks does not know, he who knows does not speak"
-- Lao Tzu

    • 1
Feb 21, 2020

To echo what some of the others said here: during an interview, you want to be the one answering the questions.

Feb 21, 2020
Softhimore:

And then asked me if I had any questions. I then jumped right in, and asked a ton of questions, their size, their specialty, some questions about if they do any equity investments, their scope, their geography and so on and so forth. ..

Yuck - you should have known all of these answers before your interview.

Next time if you don't have any meaningful questions end with something like this -

INTERVIEWER: So do you have any other questions for us?
YOU: I think we covered all of my big questions during our conversation. I appreciate your time and want to respect our allotted time-frame. What's the best method of follow up?

Anything like that. Don't ask questions for the sake of asking them. RESPEK THEY TIME FOO!!!

"Out the garage is how you end up in charge
It's how you end up in penthouses, end up in cars, it's how you
Start off a curb servin', end up a boss"

    • 1
Feb 22, 2020

Exactly this. When people say do you have any questions they don't rly mean it. But you have to say something to not be rude. So the best way is just to say some gibberish like this to pass it back. No one actually cares about your questions.

Array

Feb 22, 2020

OP - you may have spoken too much. You may not have. There is some good advice on this thread. Since you are new to this stuff, it may be a good idea to incorporate some things into your strategy for subsequent interviews. As you progress and speak to more people you will see what works and get better at it. Like in most things in life. The more you do, the more you learn from mistakes and what works for you.

Take it from someone a bit older, try not to fret or second guess yourself (I am someone who does this as well and am trying to get better at it). The past is the past and it can't be changed. Live, Learn and Move on.

Good Luck

    • 2
Feb 22, 2020

The questions are so specific and so many surprised you were able to draft so many. Definitely pick 3 max next time. Then its ok to say, "I think you answered the big things on my mind. Thanks!"

Array

Mar 13, 2020

General rule of thumb, don't sound too desperate. Usually the first thing you think of what went wrong is a good instinct and trust that. 'Optimise on the fly' as self-awareness is actually a core skill. Be concise with answers. Pause few seconds and think about what they are asking you and why they are asking you that. Come back in bullet points structures. The more senior the person is, the more they are used to an envrioment when things are summarised down to the barebones and they can make a decision rather quickly.

Mar 20, 2020

in the future, when asked "do you have any questions for me?" i would suggest you asking for their opinion on an investment / trade....ie...i'm looking at xyz trade for abc reasons....this what i'm thinking...what do you think?

    • 1
Mar 21, 2020
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