What are some interview questions that you usually ask the company?

Obviously it depends on the company and what they do within real estate but was curious as to what questions all of you ask in the final round?

Comments (33)

May 20, 2018

PM me I may be able to help

May 20, 2018

Apparently I've sent out too many PMS today.

As of now here is what I'm thinking

  1. Specific market they are looking at right beyond the 14 core markets they focus on
    2.What has been reoccuring challenges they have faced on the job?
    3.Day to day?
    4.Things you like and things you dislike about the company and your role?
    5.Most memorable project?
    6.They have two branded types of apartments, so what was the decision behind creating two brands as opposed to branding each building differently, and how has it helped the company?
    7.How are their developments financed and what is the debt/equity split?
    8.Whats the typical amount of type they will hold for, and whats the lowest IRR that they will do a development project for?
    9.What are their plans as we approach the last part/end of the cycle in the next couple of years? Acquisitions/asset management?

Would appreciate any questions you can think of or any input on the questions I have that I should or should not ask.

Thanks

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Most Helpful
May 20, 2018

The goal of asking questions is building rapport with the other person so they make the decision to hire you. I find that the best way to do this is showing genuine interest in their background and current role, and trying to display your own competence whenever you can (without being too obvious). Try to stay away from the immaterial (things you can find on the company website, random data points, etc.) and instead focus on questions that dig into their motivation for coming into work each day and the interesting projects the company is engaged in. Some of my favorite questions include:

1.) What was your path to company X?
2.) Why do you enjoy working at company X/your current position?
3.) What has been your favorite project so far and why?
4.) What in your opinion makes a great analyst versus a mediocre analyst?
5.) Tell me about X project/development/investment, etc.
6.) If you don't already know the answer to this already What is the day to day like?

Don't be a question asking robot but hopefully this suffices as a solid outline. Good luck.

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May 21, 2018

Thank you for the questions, appreciate it.

    • 1
May 21, 2018

I'll share some of my favorites:

  • What is your favorite and least favorite part of the company?
  • What are your favorite ways to spend your free time?
  • If you had to get three things right with this hire, what would they be?
  • If we look back years from now and are celebrating how great a job I did, what would be the accomplishments we would be discussing?
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May 21, 2018

I think it's important to get an understanding of where the company's funds are at in their life-cycle at the current moment. Are they in the process of deploying a lot of capital and sourcing new deals? Doing cap-raises? Holding their assets and sitting on cash?

It's an interesting way to seguay into talking about some current deals the person you're talking to has been working on but it also gives you some implicit info about what your role for the company is going to entail for the time being.

I also like to ask people if there was ever a deal they worked on that they fell in love with but didn't get to execute. A lot of people have a good story about that.

    • 1
Jun 1, 2018

Not specific to real estate, but try to ask some questions that puts the interviewer in the position of trying to sell you on why you should come work there, without being overt about it. One person already hit on one or two of these.....

What were the factors that led you to choose this firm?

If you were starting at my level, what would be the most important decision points about a firm when deciding where to go?

By your being at this firm for [10] years, I can only assume that you choose to stay here because you enjoy it and find continued opportunities here....what are the reasons you continue to enjoy working here?

What do you think are the most important things for someone to learn in their first 5 years in this career and how would you think about that from my perspective?

These sound a little more overt than I expected when reading them, but you'll soften them verbally.

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Jun 25, 2018

Probably the best list of questions that I've found +1, Dick and a toast of Bombay Sapphire to you

    • 1
Jun 25, 2018

Michiavelli, have you checked out these or run a search:

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  • More suggestions...

Who will rescue this thread? @DeepLearning @Badash16 @Summertime2018

Hope that helps.

Jun 25, 2018

you ask them how many ping pong balls it takes to fill a passenger aircraft

Jun 25, 2018
jsmort11:

you ask them how many ping pong balls it takes to fill a passenger aircraft

ha ha niice

Jun 25, 2018

This is the easiest part of the interview. Use your imagination.

Jun 25, 2018

What are your career goals?

Jun 25, 2018

i think it helps to ask questions about themselves .. try to build on something they mentioned in their own story (typically) told at the beginning of the interview. seems that people love talking about themselves haha. I had trouble with this one too but it gets better.

Jun 25, 2018

Although it's highly recommended by professionals, I never asked the cliche questions that are expected, such as "Could you tell me some of the daily duties if I get this position?" or "What do you like most about the company?" Be different and stand out. Like Joesmoe said, use your imagination.

Jun 25, 2018

Ask them about things you can't find on a website. What is the culture like? Are you "friends" with your co-workers? What kind of training did you receive? What is the typical career progression? What is your background and how did you end up at X firm? Do you see yourself staying here for a long time or transferring elsewhere?

Lots of advice on this in some of the WSO guides as well I believe.

Jun 25, 2018

Do your research on their website, I'm talking complete research and as you go through, try to think of questions that they haven't answered on there for YOU. I think those ones turn out to be most helpful and will be looked at as genuine and honest. Also, as someone above mentioned, try to weave in something they said and then turn it around into a question; for example: "You mentioned you've been with X firm for 5 years, what was it like starting out, how was the training program like, did you stay friends/colleagues with those in your training class? etc" Also I think if you ask about the career progression for places where it's not exactly clear how and what you have to do to make it somewhere, that will show that you have high ambitions for the position and are looking to stay with them for the longer haul, not just jump ship after two years. Best of luck

Jun 25, 2018

how did they get into the business

what attracted them to the business

what's the amount of $$$ they would have to have to quit

what is their favorite color

Jun 25, 2018

pointing at picture frame on desk

"Is that your daughter?"

Regards

Jun 25, 2018

^hahahahahah. such a troll

Jun 25, 2018

^hahahahahah. such a troll

Jun 25, 2018

Get an offer first, then ask for a casual meeting over coffee before you accept. Use that an opportunity to ask the questions. Not in the interview.

Jun 25, 2018

Thanks, I appreciate your advice

Jun 25, 2018

To be risk averse, don't ask the question. You can always pose this as an "out of curiosity" question but I think a better way to approach would be about how you noticed that they were acquired by a PE fund and wanted to know how they viewed the transition (what are the challenges, opportunities etc.)--don't mention the negatives or numbers unless they do. You still show your knowledge of the company anyways. In an interview setting, you may want to minimize those risky questions since it could go either way.

For the lead! Sipag, tiyaga, at lakas ng loob!

Jun 25, 2018

Seems like a risky bet with limited chance for pay off. I agree with stepback mention the PE connection but not how the company was doing financially.

Jun 25, 2018
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Jun 25, 2018