Good questions to Ask in Coffee Chats for Investment Banking

zentiger's picture
Rank: Baboon | 136

I'm starting to reach out to ppl and have secured a few coffee chats with BBs, IBD.

What are good things to ask in a coffee chat or networking session, with someone (say an analyst/associate) that you have no connection to? Aka not a warm connection.

I know a lot of these conversations just involve people skills, i.e appearing engaged in the conversation, etc, and it's definitely an art. But question wise, this is something I can easily prepare. Any tips or good questions that you've found lead to more meaningful conversations? Also anything in general to put on a good impression at a coffee chat?

Mod Note (Andy): #TBT Throwback Thursday - this was originally posted on 10/08/14. To see all of our top content from the past, click here.

What to Ask in Phone Chat Informational Interview?

When going through an informational interview, whether in person or on the phone, it is important to spend time getting to know the firm your coffee date works for and their experience in the industry. However, you also want to make sure that you learn a bit about them personally in order to connect on a more human level.

Below you can find a list of boiler plate, standard questions you can ask during an informational interview:

  • Why did you choose to work for Morgan Stanley?
  • What led you to a career in investment banking?
  • What has been your favorite experience in investment banking thus far? / Favorite deal?
  • What surprised you the most about starting full time when compared to your intern experience (note: question to be asked to a junior employee)
  • What do you think makes Morgan Stanley unique?
  • Why did you choose to work in industrials at MS?
  • What advice do you have for someone going through the networking / interview process during college?

Note: Make sure that you do not ask technical questions or ask a question that seems out of place simply for the purposes of sounding smart. It will come across as aggressive and showy and that will not be looked upon favorably.

Connecting with Professionals During an Informational Coffee Chat?

Once you have spent some time working through the above questions (or similar topics) you will want to steer the conversation into a more personal area. Try and find a way to connect with the professional on a personal level so that you will seem more human and you'll be more memorable to the professional (and therefore they will be more willing to help you.)

You should do some pre-reading on the professional to see if they have any well-established hobbies or interests that can be found through some social media / LinkedIn stalking. You can then steer the conversation in that direction especially if they have any unique hobbies or interests that you can relate to. Do not fabricate an interest in something just because you know the professional has that interest.

You can learn more about coffee chats and networking with the below video.

Read More About Networking on WSO

Preparing for Investment Banking Interviews?

The WSO investment banking interview course is designed by countless professionals with real world experience, tailored to people aspiring to break into the industry. This guide will help you learn how to answer these questions and many, many more.

Investment Banking Interview Course Here

Comments (107)

Oct 7, 2014

To put on a good impression, chat a little about the work, their background, general tips etc (the regular stuff as you mention) and then try to turn the conversation to something they're interested in outside of work, espeically if you share a common interest. Much more fun to get away from work for a little while and talk with someone about NFL or art or comedy or books or whatever I love/we share an interest in, versus just droning on about what my favourite deal may have been or other things that I spend all day thinking about anyway.

    • 5
Best Response
Oct 7, 2014

Agreed, you could also offer them a line of coke or invite a prostitute along to loosen up the tension.

    • 29
Sep 20, 2016

lol

Oct 7, 2014

It's definitely great to get away from conversation about work, but I would make sure to chat about that first since that is the reason you set up the chat in the first place. I usually make sure I understand the general gist of what they do before trying to turn the conversation toward other things.

Oct 7, 2014

Doing the above will not only make it a more fun conversation for you (pretty easy to relax and let it turn into a natural conversation if someone is chatting about stuff they/you enjoy rather than forcing work questions) but will also make them remember you more fondly than they will remember someone else who just asked about work and clearly was talking only with an interest in recruiting help - while the person will also know that's likely what you're after as well, at least they enjoy chatting with you more and may like you are more than a potential intern.

    • 1
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Jul 10, 2017

A question that borders between both work and casual, that I like to use for many types of interviews is: "Describe the company/yourself in one word?" Many times interviewers may ask difficult questions to test you or poke tricky subjects to see how you react to pressure and your ability to hustle under unexpected circumstances. Asking this question, I believe, shows them that not only you can work under pressure, but also put on the pressure. I would ask this question only afterwards they finish their initial "Why would you like to work for us?" type of questions though.

Oct 7, 2014

Tell me about yourself.

Oct 7, 2014

Ask them questions and get them talking about their favorite topic- themselves. People want to talk about themselves and have someone genuinely interested in listening to them talk about themselves. Think about a time you have talked to a person that has actively listened and acted interested in everything you were saying. Chances are, you walked away really liking that person and having a warm feeling about them. So ask the individual you invited to coffee about their role, business as it pertains to them individually, and then their interests outside of the office (books, travel, vacation, spots, hobbies, culture). If the conversation is going well and it feels right, ask about their family- this is especially good if they have children, people love to talk about their kids. The best conversation you can have is one that you control with questions that lead to more questions and where you spend most of your time actively listening.

    • 11
Oct 8, 2014

Somebody is a Dale Carnegie fan

    • 5
Jul 16, 2017

This makes a lot of sense. Thanks, for Sharing.

Oct 7, 2014

Remember, you are talking to a human being. The last thing the individual is going to want to do is listen to you put on a show about how smart you are and how much you know about stocks or anything else. Your peers who do this and get shutdown are shutdown because they are boring and showing that they do not care at all about the person sitting across from them.

Oct 7, 2014

All of @"notthehospitalER"'s advice is spot on. To add, I research the hell out of someone new I'm meeting with, and I'm not trying to network for jobs. For deals, raising capital, whatever. Obviously I'm not doing this when someone's trying to sell us new office equipment but when it's something important I will scour the internet to find out something about this person that's not readily available on the normal channels like LinkedIn. I don't care if I see that they're the President of their local spelunking club, that they sit on the board of their kids preschool, that they spent time in New Delhi during Diwali, or whatever it is. I have more life experience than someone in college so there's a chance that I'll actually find something in common (I've been in India for Diwali and I sit on my son's preschool board for example) but if I don't I then research something that I found and learn enough about it to talk about it. I steer the conversation towards that: "so do you have any free time and what do you like to do with it?...Spelunking? I've thought about trying it out. When I was younger I used to like to get in tight, dark, wet places and was looking into it. How would I go about it, where, equipment, etc?" Of course don't say something that you wouldn't actually do: you could end up working with this guy and actually have to go spelunking so don't say you'd like to get into bisexual latex S&M if you're allergic to latex and don't want a pickle tickling your lower colon.

People like to talk about what they like to do, especially if it's something off the beaten path (golfing is just overdone unless you were on the varsity college team at Stanford) or interesting experiences they've had and they'll remember and subconsciously like you if you genuinely have that in common or simply talked about it. That doesn't mean you shouldn't have something business related to talk about intelligently of course.

    • 12
Oct 8, 2014

My sides.. They're killing me! But really, this is solid advice, thanks for sharing!

Oct 8, 2014

when you sit down first, ask they "hey hows it going? how was your week/day" they'll respond, you make some slight mark oh, sorry to hear or haha thats good. they'll ask you how yours was

say "its been great" and give a good reason why even if it wasn't a good week. makes everything a bit more comfy.

    • 1
Oct 8, 2014

1. School
2. What you study
3. Career Aspirations
4. Will you get me an Interview?

I'm bi-winning. I win here, and I win there.

    • 2
Oct 8, 2014

Can you tell me about a time when you have explained something complex in a simple way?
Can you tell me about a time when you showed integrity?

Sep 13, 2017

Those are crap questions for a coffee chat. Honestly, if someone asked me that over coffee I would be dying to get out of there as soon as possible.

    • 1
Oct 8, 2014

I've found that, more often than not, the other side (a.k.a. the coffee invitee) will direct the discussion on the job itself. I've even been in a "ok, so you're after a job at our place? Let me tell you what you need to do" type of situation.

If you're a cool guy, being yourself never hurts.

Oct 8, 2014

I prefer something a little more memorable...

What's your net worth? Are you liquid?

How many girls in the office have you banged?

(pull flask out from coat) Would you like a little gin in your coffee?

Can you scratch my back?

Are you packing a whole hog or a Tic Tac?

Can I borrow $20?

Do you want to see my Furbee blog?

Who would win in a fight, Batman or Spider-Man?

Seriously, just have a normal conversation and make sure it's not an interrogation.

    • 13
Oct 8, 2014
DickFuld:

I prefer something a little more memorable...

What's your net worth? Are you liquid?

How many girls in the office have you banged?

(pull flask out from coat) Would you like a little gin in your coffee?

Can you scratch my back?

Are you packing a whole hog or a Tic Tac?

Can I borrow $20?

Do you want to see my Furbee blog?

Who would win in a fight, Batman or Spider-Man?

Seriously, just have a normal conversation and make sure it's not an interrogation.

I always ask a super hero question but Spiderman v Batman is pretty controversial. We're talking DC v Marvel. If you're a big enough geek that's like Sunni v Shiite, Israeli v Arab, or Coke v Pepsi. Just like I never recommend talking about religion I never delve into DC v Marvel. Superman v Batman is controversial enough.

Great point I forgot to mention. Just be normal. I know I was guilty of this when I was younger, and especially college aged, but just be normal and have a conversation. The person you're talking to may be an exalted IB associate or even an MD or CEO but they still wipe their asses after they shit. Once I got into the realm of regularly talking to serious players, then actually socializing with them, I realized they weren't that big of a deal.

    • 1
Dec 26, 2014

So I've been trying this out when I speak to other bankers over the phone (I'm networking). Conversation starts off great where I get to know them. But when I start asking them questions about the job, the conversation goes bad. I admit, some of the questions such as deal flow and office culture I ask are dull and all over the internet. I was wondering if you guys could tell me some job related topics I could focus on when I network.

Dec 26, 2014

Basically when you first want to "break the ice" you should avoid most work related questions in the beginning and act cool. You would first want to try to strike a conversation about one of his/her interest and if your lucky you might know some information about the persons interest, then you would talk about that get the person to like you a bit then you give the person the "Let's discuss this more on a drink." Once you grab a drink with the person that's when I feel like its appropriate to start talking about his work and even start asking for advice.
This most of the times works for me, I hope it will come in handy for you as well.

Mordi Lati
Finance Major at Baruch College

Funniest
Dec 26, 2014

you'll want to research the person who will be interviewing you. You'll want to figure out what deals he worked on, and then hammer hAMMER HAMMER HIM on those deals. Memorize stats and question his judgement. This will prove to him that you mean BUSINESS.

    • 6
Dec 26, 2014
Epictetus:

you'll want to research the person who will be interviewing you. You'll want to figure out what deals he worked on, and then hammer hAMMER HAMMER HIM on those deals. Memorize stats and question his judgement. This will prove to him that you mean BUSINESS.

This is why we need voting on posts...

OP: I'm sure you know this, but for anyone else reading, do NOT do this.

Dec 26, 2014
Epictetus:

you'll want to research the person who will be interviewing you. You'll want to figure out what deals he worked on, and then hammer hAMMER HAMMER HIM on those deals. Memorize stats and question his judgement. This will prove to him that you mean BUSINESS.

this is vERY VERY FUNNY

    • 2
Dec 26, 2014

Having conducted coffee chats myself, this is what I'd do

  1. Ask smart questions - what is work like?, what keeps it engaging/interesting?, walk me through a project?
  2. Be likable - VERY IMPORTANT - do not be a pest, do not look bored, be smart and friendly
  3. Sell yourself a little but be subtle. For example don't say "I like creating an impact and I know I can"; instead if the interviewer tells you about a case wherein he/she had a lot of impact say "that must have been very fulfilling, I think thats what appeals to me"
  4. Be sincere, if you can't say these things honestly, then you probably won't like the job
Dec 26, 2014

There is no "right" answer to any of these questions, with exception to maybe the first.

If you expect them to be dressed in formal attire, I think a suit with no tie is entirely appropriate. This type of meeting is one of few exceptions where it's okay for you to be dressed less formal. You're not stepping out from work and you're not going to a formal interview -- I would never expect a candidate to be wearing a tie if he is still in school and I am just assuming he is going out to meet me for coffee.

Coffee chats should not include technicals. It's a chance for you and someone from the firm to learn more about each other and the firm and potential opportunities in a less formal environment. As cliche as it sounds, bankers tend to enjoy talking about their own background and what brought them to their current position. As a tangential point, I think it is because they view it as an opportunity to reinforce their confidence in making good career choices. That being said, try to learn as much as you can about them, why they joined the firm, what they think distinguishes it from other places, etc. You can easily use some of these responses as opportunities to voice your interest in the firm. Be prepared to come up with some solid answers on why their firm specifically -- I think this is probably the most important thing you can do in a coffee chat besides proving to them you're not some socially awkward guy they wouldn't want in their group (that should be accomplished through introducing yourself and talking a bit about your own background).

There isn't a staple expected duration for this kind of meeting; however, I would go in expecting it to last 15-30 minutes. If you think it goes well but it doesn't last long, don't worry. Sometimes these things are better if they are shorter. The last thing you want is for the meeting reach a point where the other person starts itching to get back to work and is waiting for an opportunity to cut you off and end the conversation. Ask the questions you want to ask then actually create some small conversation based on the responses -- do your best to avoid the meeting turning into some formulaic timed Q&A session. If you're done early, don't feel pressured to ask more to extend the length.

Bottom-line - be normal and view this as a great opportunity to learn more about the firm and the banker in a less formal environment. It's not an interview or an info session, it's a conversation over coffee. Don't let the subtle undertone of this being platform to set yourself up for an interview result in you treating this as anything more than a conversation. All you need is for the conversation to go well so the banker can leave thinking "good guy, qualified for the job, demonstrated interest in our group, we should bring him in." Just like the analysis we do, it isn't rocket science.

    • 4
Dec 26, 2014

Sorry to bring up old threads, but I have a question or two regarding this. I met an MD through my summer job at a country club. He works at a BB. Contacted him every month or so for questions and he referred some books to me to read up about IB, i.e. Monkey Business and The Accidental Investment Banker. I will be in NYC next week and asked if he could meet up for coffee. I feel confident in my ability to handle a professional conversation. Just curious on how forward I would appear giving him my resume at the end or asking him to pass it along to the necessary people. Also, if I should expect anything to come of this or any conversation/topic i should avoid bringing up. I graduate this spring from a non target school, no finance related work experience, and CFA Level 1 candidate this June.

Dec 26, 2014

Don't overthink it...

    • 1
Dec 26, 2014

When you want something from someone else, your main goal should always be to be likable - it makes it much easier for someone to give you something when they like you. That being said, different people like different things, so play it by ear - sometimes they just want to talk and reminisce, other times they're genuinely interested in answering your questions. Hopefully your past coffee chats will help with this - your most productive ones were probably more like a conversation between two friends than a straight up Q&A session (but sometimes that's just how these things go).

In SA recruiting, did you interview with this bank? If so, maybe at the end, you can emphasize how you're still very interested - "Thanks so much for the time blah blah blah, I also just wanted to take this opportunity to emphasize once again how interested I am in the role" (figure out whatever sort of phrasing works best for you).

Dec 26, 2014

any help would be great!

Dec 26, 2014
  1. Don't beat around the bush. This guy knows why you want to meet with him and it's insulting to his intelligence to pretend otherwise. Don't lead with it, but don't be afraid to talk internships.
  2. Dress the part. Wear a conservative suit, shirt, and tie. No business casual. No skinny pants or GQ style suits.
  3. Ask him questions. After you give your background and say why you're interested, every other thing out of your mouth should be asking him intelligent questions about his background and what he does on a daily basis.
  4. Do your research. Look up what his company, or better if you can, his group has been up to. Find a way to work this in that isn't obnoxious.
  5. Follow up. Write him a hand written letter or send him a thoughtful email thanking him for meeting with you. Be genuine and reference something you discussed.
    • 8
Dec 26, 2014

thanks for all your helpful comments lately :-)

WSO's COO (Chief Operating Orangutan) | My Linkedin

Dec 26, 2014

CRE is on the money, would SB if I could.

Dec 26, 2014

If they played sports, interests they have.. Just get them talking about themselves and try to make it as normal as possible.

Dec 26, 2014

i wouldn't panic so much. if you already did an informational with them on the phone, they should understand that you might be running out of formal/business-related questions and they should be willing to "work with you" and not put you on the spot. if they're cool.

but if you need more material, there are definitely threads on here etc. ... there are probably more questions out there you haven't asked.

Dec 26, 2014

Ask them if they like scary movies.

Dec 26, 2014

URGENT: how do I talk to people!?

Dec 26, 2014
compinvbanker:

URGENT: how do I talk to people!?

Haha. Astute observation.

Dec 26, 2014

Hah!

Dec 26, 2014

Half the questions on WSO are aspergy as fuck

Dec 26, 2014
kidflash:

Half the questions on WSO are aspergy as fuck

Man I totally agree. I've only starting hanging out here a lot recently and it no longer amazes me that I got a decent banking job...

Dec 26, 2014

Here's some advice. BE A NORMAL PERSON. You'll be fine

Dec 26, 2014

Generally, I'd ask about their interaction with clients in their coverage universe, what was their most insightful research report and why. After you've shown some genuine interest, I might guide the conversation to something more along the lines of "what characteristics have you seen in people who successfully transfer from ops" etc.

I'd write a sample equity research report and have that in your back pocket. Makes for good fodder. I'd have any friendly industry people you know review it first. Depending on how things go, I would consider asking if I could shoot it over to them for feedback. Good excuse to keep in touch after the initial coffee.

Dec 26, 2014

Calling shenanigans on this one...

You need to understand that a good firm, a profitable firm, and an attractive stock investment can be 3 unrelated things. -Epicurean Dealmaker

Dec 26, 2014

I don't get it. It sounds like you guys already know each other, so what's the problem?

Dec 26, 2014

Have a conversation with the guy.

Dec 26, 2014
lasampdoria:

Have a conversation with the guy.

I know but this is my first time doing this and I'd appreciate some kind of framework. Also, networking is REALLY unconventional in my country, so I want to make the best impression possible. I'm hoping some guys who work in ER or have experience with this could make some suggestions as to how to impress him. Investing and researching equities is such a huge passion of mine and I just hope that shows in our meeting. I really just want to make the best out of this opportunity as possible, so as to foster a good relationship for the future.

Dec 26, 2014

There's something else I would like advice on, in regards to my story.

I actually never graduated from high school. I left early to pursue a bachelor of science degree, in order to apply to med school. I was always good at science, but I soon realised that being a doctor wasn't a true passion of mine but rather something I was doing out of the expectations of my parents. All the while, during high school and during my science degree, I was always focused on researching the financial markets and investing on a demo account. After some time, I realised that science and medicine was not what I truly wanted to do in life, and decided to switch to a business degree, so I could pursue my passion.

I'm not sure if I should mention this, since the fact I never graduated from high school might be an automatic ding. What do you guys think?

Dec 26, 2014

Bump. I'd really appreciate some advice from the more experienced guys or people who already work in ER.

Dec 26, 2014

This is not (but it kind of is) an interview... A better way to think of it is, it's the VP's coffee break..

1, he wants a good, relaxed easy conversation. Relax, smile, and make the time as easy as possible. There is nothing bad that will happen unless you freakout and pour hot coffee on him..

2, know you story well. (Dont mention the high school thing) but mention why you like ER, the work, the process, & his firm etc. [If you don't get a position at his firm, he might help you find one].

3, have something interesting to say. Talk about something in the markets, most people like sports, maybe cars or some new tech product. Just try to steer the conversation to whatever topic the VP likes, not what you like, and expand on that.

4, if things get slow start talking about your researching skills, what he likes to see in an analyst etc..

But as simply as @"lasampdoria" has said, just have a conversation with him.

Dec 26, 2014

I'm not in ER (lower-MM PE so the firms have I've been with for a while are not large bureaucratic organizations where you have to tick the boxes and only hire certain types so this may not be applicable to those firms) and I hired one kid who didn't graduate from high school and went to college early. That's a plus in my book. Smart enough and hard working enough to get accepted to college at 16? The most successful guy from my high school left for college at 16 and he sold his third tech company for 9 figures in his early 30's and has been a VC for almost 10 years now.

Dec 26, 2014

Thanks guys. I really appreciate your assistance.

Dec 26, 2014

Don't focus on what you're going to tell him, focus on what he can tell you. Asking follow up questions is an art and something you'll get better at. Don't worry - by having coffee with him you've already made a stronger impression than 90% of the kids out there.

I find that the hardest part is steering the conversation away from professional life and talking about similar interests etc. That leaves a much stronger impression than whatever you can tell him about your research process or ask him about his. Who knows, maybe he needs a new racketball partner? It's stuff like that that forges relationships.

Dec 26, 2014
TheSanchize:

Don't focus on what you're going to tell him, focus on what he can tell you. Asking follow up questions is an art and something you'll get better at. Don't worry - by having coffee with him you've already made a stronger impression than 90% of the kids out there.

I find that the hardest part is steering the conversation away from professional life and talking about similar interests etc. That leaves a much stronger impression than whatever you can tell him about your research process or ask him about his. Who knows, maybe he needs a new racketball partner? It's stuff like that that forges relationships.

Thanks for the response.

Steering the conversation from professional to something more social is definitely an aspect that I'm unsure about. Also, I really don't want to screw this up, since networking is something that students rarely (if ever) do in my country.

Dec 26, 2014

Be ready to comment on the market, his fund, your professional experience, your education, the normal stuff etc.. But most importantly have a normal conversation with him, ask about his experiences in and out of work. Coffee is more about making a connection with him, less boring him with the same old stuff he hears every day.

    • 1
Dec 26, 2014

Right, got it. Guess I shouldn't expect anything too funky.

I don't know how likely it is that he's just taking the meeting out of courtesy but I guess I should be prepared to be thrown out after 10 minutes.

Dec 26, 2014

To echo the first comment: it is incredibly unlikely you will be able to say something more insightful about the markets than he hears every day, considering who he works with. Focus on: 1) connecting with him and getting him to like you, and 2) not sounding like a fool when it comes to markets. Don't try and get too fancy and talk about anything too esoteric.

    • 1
Dec 26, 2014

Cool, will do.

Dec 26, 2014

Make him feel special(more than what he already is) and you're in the big leagues, kid.

Best

Dec 26, 2014

One of my good friends will be drafted in the first round of the upcoming NFL draft. BTW I attended 'Bama, where football players are viewed as celebrities. This friend once told me that most of us [football players] are just normal people, and that there is no reason for anyone to view or treat us any differently because of our status.

That notion carries over quite well when it comes to the networking process. Just remember that fund managers or anyone important for that matter, like you and I, are people. I've worked with a dozen hedge fund managers, and to my surprise, none of them are the pricks commonly portrayed in the media. In fact, most are very nice people so there is no reason to be nervous! I think the first objective of your meeting should be oriented around developing a friendship.

So make absolute sure the two of you are waiting in line together for coffee as this is an opportunity for you and him to engage in small talk. When you sit down at your table, ease the conversation into markets or whatever the topic concerning your meeting is.

Here are a few of my tips. As always, suck up but do it in a subtle manner. In other words, don't pull a Bud Fox and immediately start telling the PM how much of a genius he is and how much you respect his work. Instead, tell him how brilliant one of his/his company's investment ideas is and give supporting reasons why. By incorporating some of his fund's ideas into your own ideas, you kill two birds with one stone by 1) flattering him and 2) demonstrating a potential fit. Keep in mind, a fund manager, like any normal human, would be more comfortable hiring an individual they can drink a beer on the weekends with.

    • 2
Dec 26, 2014

Guys, thanks for all the great tips! As an update, I can say that I have met with TWO HF managers today, one of which I saw as more important due to its great fit with my ambitions. Both were very positive and helpful, so we'll see how it goes from here.

My approach was just to let the conversation flow naturally, listen carefully and ask as intelligent questions as possible. All in all, a great experience and I feel smarter and more determined to break in as a result of the chats.

Dec 26, 2014

Congrats good to hear!

Dec 26, 2014

i dont know about "trying to become his friend"...not sure how that will work out. Just start by asking him about his career, how he got where he is, etc and move on from there. I would be prepared with market stuff to say but also as noted above be cognizant that u likely arent going to blow him away...that is OK, you can still talk but make sure u communicate in some way that you get it and you dont think you are a boy genius. I think you want to show in this type of situation that you are smart and thoughtful, but arent arrogant enuff to think that you know it all. Lastly if the conversation gets around at all to talk of an actual job, make sure you are clear that you will work your ass off and do anything to get ur foot in the door.

    • 1
Dec 26, 2014

good luck, let us know how it goes.. id be interested in hearing some of his best ideas in the past and how he worked them out... the thought process.. if you could come back to us with that, that would be incredible and a good opportunity to connect with him and his thought process.

Dec 26, 2014

I would be very interested in knowing how it went.

Dec 26, 2014
UnclePanda:

good luck, let us know how it goes.. id be interested in hearing some of his best ideas in the past and how he worked them out... the thought process.. if you could come back to us with that, that would be incredible and a good opportunity to connect with him and his thought process.

I recommend reading all the Market Wizards books for this. I think that's a better way of learning than me retelling stories etc.

As for how it went, guys - really well. I'll let you know what happens next. Still waiting to hear back from in particular one of the guys, who was very encouraging. Cheers

Dec 26, 2014

It sounds like a great opportunity...and lots of good advice already. One pice of advice would be to find something that you two have in common...other than the hedge fund thing. If he played football in college and you did too...there you go. I'd find something like that and mention it if the conversation is going well...it helps to keep the positive momentum going and shows that you have a connection. It's just one small thing you can do to keep yourself from being forgotten the moment you two walk away. I'd also say it's important to be relaxed. Nobody wants to meet or talk with someone who is nervous and fidgety...relax, be yourself, and have a few things ready to chat about. Allow him to talk about himself...as mentioned above, ask him how he got to where he is today...maybe ask something like the most important decision he made that may have seemed trivial at the time.

Jun 30, 2016

"have secured a few coffee chats with BBs, IBD"

omg I love this I love this I swear

Jun 30, 2016

this all comes off as very scripted. get to know the person.

Jun 30, 2016

be a human and have a normal, interested conversation. shouldn't be that hard if you actually have an interest in breaking into their career field.

Sep 20, 2016

Find out what the big project or deal is currently going on
"how's that going"
Listen for 30 min, occasionally throw in short insightful questions

Hasn't failed yet

Jul 10, 2017

The most important question is probably to ask them if they liked the whiskey you put in their coffee.

"If you always put limits on everything you do, physical or anything else, it will spread into your work and into your life. There are no limits. There are only plateaus, and you must not stay there, you must go beyond them." - Bruce Lee

Sep 13, 2017

Oh hes a MD at a top firm

"I always knew I was going to be rich. I don't think I ever doubted it for a minute."

Sep 13, 2017

I'd remove firm name if I were you

Sep 13, 2017

he's a person, you're a person have a conversation.

Sep 13, 2017

Kneepads.

You're welcome.

Sep 13, 2017
manbearpig:

Kneepads.

You're welcome.

Lmao

"I always knew I was going to be rich. I don't think I ever doubted it for a minute."

Sep 13, 2017

All jokes aside, make sure you are current. Read at least the front page of the WSJ. Just relax bud.

Patrick Bateman would eat Eddie Morra's lunch (and probably his brains).

Sep 13, 2017

crabcakes and football

"I'm short your house"

Sep 13, 2017

have a normal convo. ask him about himself and act interested. i would have questions prepared.

Sep 13, 2017

wall street protests, steve jobs, and the nba lockout

Sep 13, 2017
FlySoHigh:

wall street protests, steve jobs, and the nba lockout

good, except nobody cares about the nba lockout

Sep 13, 2017

nobody cares about a nba lockout. it's all about steve jobs and innovation. don't ask stupid questions.

Sep 13, 2017

I think it's okay to talk about sports and stuffs with analysts and associates. But MDs are busy and way past the age of meaningless chat. You should quickly identify his personality and then talk appropriately after that. No matter how cool he is, the time he spends with you could be spent making shit loads of money else where. You better bring something interesting to the table.

Sep 13, 2017

Thank you all for the great advice.

I was thinking about mentioning the Wall Street protest but didn't know in what manner

"I always knew I was going to be rich. I don't think I ever doubted it for a minute."

Sep 13, 2017
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Sep 13, 2017
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no way kimosabe, this is my house now --Brennan Huff

Sep 13, 2017
Sep 13, 2017
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If I had asked people what they wanted, they would have said faster horses - Henry Ford

Sep 13, 2017
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