9/1/08

I'm touching up my resume right now, but it's coming up a bit empty. I'm trying to decide what coursework I should list that would be appropriate for a banking internship. Problem is, I haven't taken any "real" finance courses yet, just general business stuff that's part of our core curriculum. Would appreciate feedback on which courses should go on the resume...

So far, I've taken:
Problem Solving using Computer Software (Word, Excel, & Powerpoint, basically)
Calculus
Statistics with Regression
Principles of Financial Accounting
Principles of Managerial Accounting
Principles of Management
Principles of Marketing
Supply Chain and Operations Management
Principles of Entrepreneurship
Macro/microeconomics

Maybe I have more courses relevant to consulting internships at the moment?

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Comments (77)

9/1/08

calc, stats, financial accounting, macro/micro

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9/1/08

I agree with the classes j-rad highlighted. Also, be prepared to talk about the classes you list in interviews.

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9/2/08

Just say "Financial Accounting", etc. They will get it (there aren't upper-level marketing courses just called "Marketing" because they are more specific).

9/2/08

The "principles" courses aren't worth mentioning because they are the same low-level, intro courses everyone in b-school takes. Calc and stats also are standard, but better to mention. You have taken just the standard stuff, so you don't have anything distinctive to mention. If you can, take a more advanced course in math or analysis or something that sets you apart from the tens of thousands of business majors.

9/2/08

this section should be as minimal as possible - try to give more substance to work experience and extra curriculars. they should have a good idea of the courses you've taken based on your major(s) and minor(s), listed in your education section

10/18/12

Hello...
Names Devin am in class right now well in careers and were doing a mock resume and what the resume says in one of the things, well in Education, is relevant courses and then the next is relevant projects what does that mean?? Oh am in grade 10 too.

10/18/12

If you do decide to include coursework on your resume I would advise you to tailor the relevant course work to what your employer is interested in. ie:lets say you apply at a prop shop, I don't think they would be as interested in knowing that you took Principles of Accounting versus Probability Theory.

10/18/12

Your listing is pretty redundant. Doesn't the fact that you've taken Calc 3 imply that you've taken 1 and 2? The same going for intermediate macro/micro and intro macro/micro. In fact, I'd just get rid of those macro and micro courses as they are really par for the course for any econ major.

And if you're looking to get into IB, you can easily get rid of some of the others (Industrial Organization and Performance for example).

10/18/12

Agree with trackstart2k2. If you're going into trading then not all of that is relevant. If you're going into IBD then most of it isn't necessary to list. And you don't need to list lower courses when higher courses are there. For example, you don't need to say calc 1 and calc 2 and calc 3 when calc 3 basically says that you've covered 1 and 2. Same for econ. You don't need to list intro micro and intro macro when you've also got intmdte micro and macro. That'll save you some space and redundancy and not make it feel like the recruiter is combing over your transcripts.
As for GPA, everyone knows that it's going to be more difficult to maintain a superb GPA in hard sciences like math as opposed to history or english lit. The real driver of your resume looks like it's going to be your work experience anyways

10/18/12

So would you guys advise me just take off all coursework on my resume or just shorten it up / make it more specific?

Also, if I had a major GPA of a 3.2 and cumulative of 3.1, you guys think there is any benefit in listing major GPA even though it's only slightly higher

10/18/12

Since the difference is marginal, I would say no. Makes it seem like your overall would be even more lacking.

10/18/12

After college, the results speak for themselves. You already have results, so let that speak over your college.

That said, include the difficult classes to help justify a lower resume.

Any update on where you ended up?

"Everyone has a plan until they get punched in the face."

10/18/12

for sure financial statement analysis. strategic management might show you understand the big picture though was most likely a class were you just bullshited.

dont you have any corporate finance, options & futures, fixed income, accounting 101 or the likes courses?

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10/18/12

Probably Financial Statement Analysis, but understand that the course you take don't really matter for interviews.

"Greed, in all of its forms; greed for life, for money, for love, for knowledge has marked the upward surge of mankind. And greed, you mark my words, will not only save Teldar Paper, but that other malfunctioning corporation called the USA."

10/18/12

Financial Statement Analysis no question

10/18/12

thanks for the help guys. to gbb, i am taking corporate finance next semester and i have taken both accounting courses. the other courses you mentioned have corporate finance as a prereq so i wont be able to take them until the spring.

10/18/12

Relevant coursework=wasted space=I have no experience. It's redundant, if you are in college studying a discipline, it's assumed you will have taken/need to taken those courses.

10/18/12

Of the courses you listed I would definitely say Financial Statement Analysis is the most relevant. That being said, because they're all "resume worthy," I would go with whatever combo is easiest, so that you can raise/maintain a high GPA. Check which professors are teaching next semester, ask friends, etc. to get the easy ones. GPA is a much greater factor than coursework.

In reply to BocaYankee
10/18/12
BocaYankee:

Relevant coursework=wasted space=I have no experience. It's redundant, if you are in college studying a discipline, it's assumed you will have taken/need to taken those courses.

he's a sophomore so his resume is only a year old. Keep the relevant coursework until you have at least 1-2 substantial internships/extracurriculars under your belt

10/18/12

Financial Statement Analysis
Decision Making Using Spreadsheet Models

Really the only two that might be relevant and I'm not sold on the second one.

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10/18/12

I've had an interviewer (who was brought in spontaneously to meet me after others had, so hadn't seen my resume) ask whether I'd taken some relevant classes - so maybe it's a check the box thing that some people like to see. Never had it brought up otherwise.

If you have better stuff to fill the space I'd say go with that - if not, listing some coursework won't hurt.

10/18/12

I have a totally unrelated major so I include it just so firms know that i've taken finance and accounting and other shit like that. But if You're major is finance then its probably not super necessary

10/18/12

From the people I've networked with, it seems to be much more important if you're non-finance major. If you're a finance major, I think it's assumed that you've taken a fair amount of relevant coursework, but it wouldn't hurt to add it unless you're really hard-pressed for room on your resume.

10/18/12

If you're a finance major...don't put it. It's redundant. Relevant coursework? ...You're in a relevant major.

If you're a non-finance major it will definitely help you to put in on there.

10/18/12

What would be your guys' opinions on neglecting to put it on there as an economics major?

In reply to GrandJury
10/18/12

Would any of these deserve to be listed?
* operations research
* project engineering
* statistical methods
* engineering economic analysis

10/18/12

I find it to be most effective to put a Relevant Coursework section if your GPA is on the bubble line at the underclassmen level. It shows you started taking core classes early. As an upperclassmen, that's not exactly a good strategy any longer and may not be necessary.

In reply to Trochaic Dimeter
10/18/12

I'm an economics major and I've been told that it's always a safe call, especially when related to accounting or Excel coursework.

In reply to anon100
10/18/12

anon100:

I'm an economics major and I've been told that it's always a safe call, especially when related to accounting or Excel coursework.


Heard the same thing. I'm also an econ major and did it when I applied for all my SA positions.
10/18/12

I think it's a good idea when you graduate and are looking for that first job. Especially if you're a non finance major. It helps interviews assess you and it also added fullness to your resume. Once you've started working I would cut that section first though.

10/18/12

How many other work experiences do you have listed? If this legal internship was freshman year, it can probably go.

One of those lights, slightly brighter than the rest, will be my wingtip passing over.

10/18/12

Try to keep both. Put relevant coursework in 2 rows with 3 columns each (find another fin-related class to make it 6 courses).

But work experience matters too, so def. keep it there. I'd say since you're not an econ major, relevant coursework might be important to show off your interest in finance, whereas work experience will show that you worked in a corporate environment.

10/18/12
10/18/12

even if you weren't it's not really necessary

no one seems to care about it, and people that have critiqued my resume always suggest cutting it if i need more space

10/18/12

I've you've got enough other stuff to fill up the page and you majored in finance I don't think you need the relevant coursework bullet.

If you've got space anyways, however, it might be worth including - particularly if you took a lot of accounting, finance and hard math classes (which always look good). Accounting is very important.

10/18/12

I second that, accounting is very very important.

10/18/12

Accounting is b!tch work.

I win here, I win there...

10/18/12

If youre looking for an internship i might include it, but its not necesary.
full time cut it

10/18/12

Normally I am personally against putting down 'relevant coursework' in my Resume. I feel like generally your major and year speaks enough and no need to take up the space. In your case I think it is good to have those two classes there, but no, Business Ethics would not fit as well under that section - the rest of your resume is to show that you are a hardworker and act ethically (perhaps Volunteer experience). I don't think it would turn anyone off a resume, but if someone asked you in an interview about it what would you say?

"I am not sure who this 'Anonymous' person is - one thing is for certain, they have been one hell of a prolific writer" - Anonymous

10/18/12

If you have space in your resume I would put it. But I personally don't have space for relevant coursework.

In reply to GoHuskies
10/18/12

GoHuskies:

Normally I am personally against putting down 'relevant coursework' in my Resume. I feel like generally your major and year speaks enough and no need to take up the space. In your case I think it is good to have those two classes there, but no, Business Ethics would not fit as well under that section - the rest of your resume is to show that you are a hardworker and act ethically (perhaps Volunteer experience). I don't think it would turn anyone off a resume, but if someone asked you in an interview about it what would you say?

This is not true at all. Most targets have certain courses that almost every recent alum on the street took, often with a specific professor, and its helpful to know whether you took that class as well and how you did. I would also throw in any functional finance courses you had (i.e. financial accounting, derivatives pricing) and then maybe a course that is interesting to talk about (game theory, behavioral economics, etc.)

10/18/12
10/18/12
10/18/12

edit: sorry, double submit.

In reply to HarvardOrBust
10/18/12
HarvardOrBust:

Take it out.

agreed.

patternfinder:

Of course, I would just buy in scales.

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10/18/12
10/18/12

IMO- no need

unless your resume is blank and need to make it fuller....

10/18/12

i think relev coursework is utterlya nnoying and a crap section on a resume so yes your idea sounds better :)

10/18/12

Include it if you have enough room, but if it causes an aesthetic problem by cramping things up, don't.

10/18/12

Only if you lack the experience or need more room.

In reply to romulusmars
10/18/12
10/18/12

I find it pointless to add relevant coursework if you're a finance/econ major. Especially econ and accounting classes. You're a finance major, obviously you took econ, accounting, and finance -- it's part of your degree. Unless you took intermediate microeconomic theory or stochastic calculus, leave it off. (I've taken both of these and don't have them listed).

If you're a non-business major then I'm all for the relevant coursework. Also if you're a freshman or sophomore then listing courses can show your interest in finance (but nothing is better than a finance internship).

But to answer your question, I would drop all the ones you've currently listed and add the first 3 you suggested (assuming you will take all these courses). And maybe list accounting.

10/18/12

In my experience, "relevant" can be loosely defined. If you want to have that section, you can put Microeconomics, Macroeconomics, Econometrics, and maybe a math class. If you were to omit the section, I don't think it would be a mortal sin.

One of those lights, slightly brighter than the rest, will be my wingtip passing over.

10/18/12

Your fine. The Relevant Courses bullet is one of the weaker bullet points and is used mostly as a segway into technical questions (ie Equity Valuation leads to "What are some ways you value a company,ect). Putting those economics courses are perfectly acceptable, and you can probably expect to be asked a question like "tell me about the economy". You can also put the calculus courses if you want to add a quantitative aspect to the resume (which can never hurt provided you can at least do multiplication problems in your head)

"Greed, in all of its forms; greed for life, for money, for love, for knowledge has marked the upward surge of mankind. And greed, you mark my words, will not only save Teldar Paper, but that other malfunctioning corporation called the USA."

10/18/12

I would absolutely list the first 4 and Financial Reporting. Econometric and calc are totally irrelevant.

10/18/12

if your Econ GPA is > 3.7 then list it
i've never seen someone list a minor GPA though, maybe you want to switch to finance major and say Finance GPA 4.0 and Cumulative 3.7?

10/18/12

I'd definitely list the relevant coursework especially since you're an Econ major in lib arts. I think it shows the technical side of your knowledge/abilities. however, just pick out a few (at most 4) that are the most applicable to the position youre applying to.

10/18/12

I personally think the best approach to a resume is being specific. It gives the reader a more concrete idea of what you are referring to and makes the experience seem more "real," (although all of your experiences should be real...) For example, I wouldn't list Algorithms. As a reader that doesn't really mean much to me. What did you do with algorithms? Learn the definition? Write a simple algorithm to multiply two numbers? Etc.

Going off the list you've got I'd say Financial Engineering, Statistical Modeling, Financial Modeling, Trading Strategies and Algorithms are pretty vague; the rest seems fine. To give you an example of what I personally might change: instead of saying statistical modeling maybe you could say Econometrics, Time Series Analysis, or whatever exactly it was. Just a thought, but I think that it is generally more helpful for the reader and doesn't make it seem quite like you're just throwing a bunch of buzzwords around.

10/18/12

I guess I didn't specifically answer your question, but a variety of quantitative courses is probably best--also anything CS related if you've taken it. I wouldn't list Calc I-III or Linear Algebra, it's kind of assumed you've taken those if you're taking Diff Eqs. and Stochastic

In reply to iwa1409
10/18/12

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10/18/12
10/18/12
In reply to Alpha_1
10/18/12

"The way to make money is to buy when blood is running in the streets."

-John D. Rockefeller

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