Thoughts on 'quiet quitting'

https://www.gallup.com/workplace/398306/quiet-qui…

"Quiet quitters" make up at least 50% of the U.S. workforce -- probably more, Gallup finds.

The trend toward quiet quitting -- the idea spreading virally on social media that millions of people are not going above and beyond at work and just meeting their job description -- could get worse. This is a problem because most jobs today require some level of extra effort to collaborate with coworkers and meet customer needs.

Comments (10)

4mo 
PrivateTechquity 🚀GME+BBBY🚀, what's your opinion? Comment below:

Seems like a silly title for them to make up. "Quitters" implies quitting and they're still meeting the job requirements work-wise, just not doing "extra". If I were working a retail/foodservice job and I didn't get any kind of bonus or other performance-based incentive why the hell would I want to do extra? Not everyone is looking to to climb a career ladder and if anything people in general should be thankful for that. 

Array

4mo 
UCSDThrowaway, what's your opinion? Comment below:
PrivateTechquity 🚀GME+BBBY🚀

Seems like a silly title for them to make up. "Quitters" implies quitting and they're still meeting the job requirements work-wise, just not doing "extra". If I were working a retail/foodservice job and I didn't get any kind of bonus or other performance-based incentive why the hell would I want to do extra? Not everyone is looking to to climb a career ladder and if anything people in general should be thankful for that. 

Yeah this is literally just coasting 

Some fuckhead came up with the term "quiet quitting" and the media ran with it because they knew it'd get clicks 

People should not be shamed for literally doing their job, instead of being a kiss ass yes man 

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4mo 
GeorgeSorosFinanceMaster, what's your opinion? Comment below:

It's basic statistics.  If you hire a bunch of people chances are it will end up looking like a bell curve.  One end has workers that don't do their jobs properly and are at risk of getting fired, the other end has workers who go above and beyond at work, and in the middle there are the ones who just do the basic requirements of their jobs, aka the 'quiet quitters'. 

This whole trend reeks of HR delusion, they think everyone they hire will be on the good side of the bell curve because they answered some questions about "leadership principles", then reality hits them in the face.

  • 2
4mo 
MonkeyNoise, what's your opinion? Comment below:

Biggest piece of media nonsense since the dad bod 

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4mo 
AnonymousGoon, what's your opinion? Comment below:

I agree with the other commenters that I dislike the term since it literally isn't quitting at all, nor is it quiet since it's not like you're ignoring your boss or something

In terms of the actual practice of not going the extra mile, I think it raises a big concern. If we assume that more people are coasting now vs before that indicates that there's something really bad happening in our workplaces. My perspective is that far fewer people are as invested in their career ambitions & relationships with coworkers in a remote environment. We know that e-learning isn't very good for student passion, I'm not surprised that e-working isn't very good for worker passion

4mo 
MonkeyNoise, what's your opinion? Comment below:

Dude this has been an issue long before working remote lmao 

the whole "soul sucking corporate job" rate race schtick has been a thing for decades with white collar office jobs. Forcing people back in the office won't help with that. Work that you tangibly see the impact will.

Unfortunately that work is less and less common these days. 

4mo 
misterfriedchicken2022, what's your opinion? Comment below:

I've had discussions about this with a few people at work. Misc thoughts below in no particular order:

  • I think "quietly re-balancing" would have been a better term. More and more people are tired of the rat race and they are simply redirecting their energy towards more crucial parts of life (eg family).
  • As with anything in life, there needs to be an optimal balance. Without overachievers and people going above and beyond, the US would not have become the world leader in innovation. In a more extreme example, lives have been saved because people have gone beyond the job description (think of soldiers who went beyond the call of duty, Medal of Honor winners, etc.).
  • As it relates to finance specifically, a work-life rebalancing is long overdue. I did my analyst years before the introduction of things like protected weekends and I'm in full support of the industry moving away from its 1990s/2000s mentality (eg it's somehow glorious that you are eating out of styrofoam boxes and sleeping under your desk).
  • Finance is a high achiever, Type A industry. You cannot escape doing "more than normal work hours" once in a while and I think people get it heading into the industry. That being said, there are certainly tons of excess fat that can be trimmed. For example, consistently getting comments at 9pm just so you can rearrange logos in PowerPoint is just dumb and disrespecting people's time. Also, creating work "for the sake of work" (eg thicker decks = better look to clients) is just dumb (I'm on the buyside now and I don't read 85% of slides I get).
  • 2
4mo 
MonkeyNoise, what's your opinion? Comment below:

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