MSc Finance 2023

Hello everyone,
I have received admits for Masters in Finance from multiple schools (SMU, NUS, Frankfurt School, McGill, ESSEC, HEC, LBS)
I do not have a specific geographic preference, hence I’m all over the place. I would like to know which school and which country would be a better option to go to considering job opportunities and standard of living
I understand, LBS is the biggest brand of all, but does it make sense to study in London as a foreigner in these tough economic times?
Also, many people have told me to just go to the US since it has the best of everything. If I consider US, I’ll be applying to UIUC and USC. 
Any sort of comparison between the schools mentioned would be a great help!
I’m from India btw.

 

If I were you I would go to LBS. French schools are worthless in your case if you are not fluent in French. Plus, you will have a bunch of Indians so it will be easier for you to integrate ;) Hope it helps

 

Thanks for replying!

What is your opinion on the US schools I mentioned?

Also, I’m slightly leaning towards Singapore since it’s closer to home and I have family settled there.  

 

I would advise against doing a degree where geographically you want to get a job. Obviously, this goes against common sense, but the reason why I say that is because you lose the opportunity to see and experience +1 country in your lifetime, and life experiences should come above your career if you want to minimze regrets down the road.

Therefore, in my opinion, McGill would be a good option because you get to experience Canada and the US (including its people and culture), and once you finish it, you could still have a good shot at European (especially UK) and Asian offices (close to your family).

Also, this advice applies only because you have no geographical preferences. Others out there use graduate degrees to move their lives permanently somewhere else, thus chosing where to do their university becomes more important.

 

Hey thanks for replying. 
I think your line of reasoning makes more sense for a 3/4 year undergrad course where you have so much more time on your hands. 
MFin at most schools is a 1 year intensive course. 

 

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